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Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

Old School Can-Do: 1945 Speed and Custom

Posted August 27, 2014 8:30 AM by dstrohl

Two years ago, Jeremy Baye decided to pursue his longtime dream of making a living customizing cars. On July 27, 2012, he opened his very own shop, 1945 Speed and Custom, at 631 River Street in Troy, New York.

The building that Jeremy had set his sights on was a bit rundown. Its garage doors were missing many of their windowpanes, and its interior left a lot to be desired. Others might not have seen the potential in it, but Jeremy did. And Jeremy's family and friends had always seen the potential in him.

They all pitched in and were willing to get their hands dirty in hopes of bringing his vision to life. Jeremy's mom would show up on her lunch break from work with sandwiches and would return later to help him whenever she had a spare minute. When his fiancée, Amy Baughman, moved to Troy from Orlando, Florida, she too pitched in to help mop, scrub, and paint.

His longtime friend, Jim "Jimbo" Rooney-a kid who had grown up in Jeremy's neighborhood and who had since become a master mechanic-would stop by to help after he got out of work with anything Jeremy needed.

See the beginning of something beautiful on Hemmings Daily.

1 comments; last comment on 08/27/2014
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Has Our Taste in Cars Changed as We’ve Grown Older?

Posted August 26, 2014 9:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: classic auto favorite preferences

"I can't believe that show was so good last night," my wife, Linda, said from the kitchen amidst the clanging of the breakfast dishes. "It was on for years, and we never watched it once back then, but now we watch it every night. Maybe we were just too young then to appreciate it." At that moment, it hit me.

Something had been gnawing at me for the past few weeks, and I hadn't been able to put my finger on the reason, but that statement made me realize what the root cause actually was-I was a dumb kid, and that's why I didn't buy that '63 Le Mans in 1987 when I had the chance.

Read the rest of the article on Hemmings Daily.

11 comments; last comment on 08/27/2014
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What Automotive Terms are Facing Extinction?

Posted August 25, 2014 10:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: classic auto lexicon vocabulary

Editor's note: This Open Diff piece comes from Hemmings Motor News account executive Bradford Kosich, who perpetually has grease beneath his fingernails and some sort of injury from working on his latest project car.

One of the great things about working at Hemmings Motor News is that readers frequently share pictures of their restoration projects with staff members. Just the other day, a reader sent me photos of his 1974 Plymouth Satellite, documenting the entire restoration process. One of the shots featured an old-style horizontal speedometer, which brought me back to the days of my youth and the old Pontiac Bonneville that I learned to drive on. We affectionately called the car "Meatloaf" due to its brown color and large, homogenous shape, but the car's saving grace was the 455-cu.in. V-8 beneath its hood.

As I traveled down this nostalgic road, I remembered a term from my youth that has all but disappeared from today's lexicon…"pinning" the speedometer.

Discuss what terms are approaching obsolescense on Hemmings.

5 comments; last comment on 08/27/2014
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Jacksonville, Florida’s Ford Plant: A Wistful Monument of the Great Depression

Posted August 20, 2014 8:30 AM by dstrohl

Long gone are the nearly three-quarters of a mile of conveyor belts. A couple inches of water have pooled up in parts of the facility, the roof leaking in a way that the whole building feels more like a movie set than a once-thriving automobile factory. Today, the former Ford plant on the banks of Jacksonville, Florida's St. John's River sits largely abandoned, belying the fact that it was once a key component of Ford's early manufacturing empire, employing hundreds of local workers to build Model T automobiles.

Like much of the city's downtown, the Ford Motor Company's long-vacant 165,200-square-foot facility lays in dilapidated ruin. Over 80 years have passed since the last Model T rolled off the assembly line...

Read about this automotive legacy ruin on Hemmings.

7 comments; last comment on 08/24/2014
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On the Generational Shift in Car Collecting

Posted August 19, 2014 9:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: classic auto collection youth

What cars will younger enthusiasts want to collect? What cars won't they collect? What cars are they collecting right now? We can almost guarantee that the answers won't match up with the cars that dominate the current collector scene, but how far off will they differ?

To answer those questions, Hagerty gathered a panel of speakers - including Dave Kinney, Donald Osborne, Ezekiel Wheeler, Rob Sass, Rory Carroll, and our own Dan Stoner - to offer their opinions earlier today in Monterey. Tell us, are they spot on about younger people's predilections toward collector cars?

See what classic cars spark kids interest on Hemmings.

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Non-Profit Vocational Program Aims to Teach Youth How to Resurrect Classic Cars

Posted August 18, 2014 10:00 AM by dstrohl

High school auto shop classes have dwindled in numbers nationwide, thanks to funding cuts. Vocational colleges that teach young adults to work on old cars cost money that many youth don't have. But one California shop owner believes he's found a way to provide the same level of instruction to at-risk youth and to make such a program pay for itself.

Suede Beradino of Santa Rosa, California, said he never had the benefit of a formal vocational program or shop class growing up in Idaho; instead, he learned how to work on cars by fixing equipment around his grandparents' farm and by pestering the old timers around town to give up their skills and secrets. However, he saw the need for a program starting a couple of years ago when he began mentoring local youth through his shop, Rad Rods of Norcal.

Read about this worthy project on Hemmings.

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