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Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

Wish You Could Buy a Modern Dodge Power Wagon? Wish No More.

Posted November 20, 2014 8:30 AM by dstrohl

Few trucks highlighted in our daily Find of the Day piece receive the same amount of commentary as vintage Dodge Power Wagons, which appear in our classifieds on a somewhat regular basis. Perhaps it's the rugged good looks of the WM series, which carried on with World War II styling from 1945 until safety and emission regulations killed the truck for good in 1968. Now, thanks to Legacy Classic Trucks in Driggs, Idaho, the Power Wagon has been reborn for a new age, and is available in two-door, four-door or Carryall (SUV) variants.

To be clear, Legacy isn't building new Power Wagons from the ground up, although given how much work goes into producing one of its trucks, it would be hard to tell the difference. Beginning with a clean Carryall WC-53 or pickup donor, (which can be sourced by Legacy or provided by a customer), the firm performs a body-off-frame restoration and then begins reassembling the truck with modern mechanicals and interior appointments, many of which can be chosen by prospective buyers during the ordering process.

See current Power Wagons in their prime on Hemmings.

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Did You Ever Buy a Vintage Car Part Without Even Knowing What Car it Came From?

Posted November 19, 2014 8:30 AM by dstrohl

If you answered "yes" to this question, then you've got it bad, my friend. And as you may have guessed, I wouldn't have asked had I not done it myself-more times than I care to admit.

Some vintage parts are so imaginatively designed that I like to have them just for display, which is good because they don't have to work. Even if they are primarily used as paperweights on my desk (remember when we actually used paper?) or are placed on a shelf, I still get to look at them on a daily basis and appreciate their craftsmanship. I call them UFOCPs: Unidentified Fascinating Old Car Parts.

My favorites include factory gauges. As some of you know from reading my past articles in HMN I have an affinity for vacuum/economy gauges, regardless of the year or model in which they were factory installed. Tachs and clocks are also fun to have and stare at, but the former have grown especially expensive.

What parts instigate buyer's remorse?

1 comments; last comment on 11/19/2014
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Chevrolet and Dodge Highlight Pony Car Offerings at SEMA

Posted November 18, 2014 9:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: camaro Challenger chevrolet dodge

The current-generation Chevrolet Camaro and Dodge Challenger may be getting a bit long in the tooth, but that's no reason to avoid showing off the latest variants at SEMA. Dodge featured its recently announced Challenger Hellcat prominently, but also displayed a Challenger T/A concept that could conceivably be built with the Mopar parts catalog and some patience; Chevrolet, on the other hand, announced a trio of special edition Camaros that will hit dealer showrooms in early 2015.

See new pony car innovations on Hemmings.

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Birth of the Jeep: An Autobiography

Posted November 17, 2014 10:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: classic auto history jeep military

(Editor's note: This post originally appeared on Hemmings on November 11 in honor of Veteran's Day.)

"If this vehicle could talk, oh, what stories it could tell." We've heard that one more than a few times, too, but we're here to tell you: They CAN talk, and we have the video and soundtrack to prove it. So be cautious about what you do, say or shout during that next ill-timed automotive component failure, because your vehicle may just decide to share it with the entire world, embarrassing owner/driver moments and all. But if you've treated your vehicular buddy well, the story it tells can be a good-humored one.

See the wheels that won a war, on Hemmings Daily.

1 comments; last comment on 11/17/2014
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So How’d That Redneck Paint Booth Work Out For Ya?

Posted November 13, 2014 8:30 AM by dstrohl

Last year, reader Dale Osterman of Prattville, Alabama, shared with us the progress he was making on the restoration of his 1976 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am, his mid-life crisis car and daily driver for part of a decade. Specifically, he described to us his homegrown paint booth, not much more than a picnic shelter with flyscreens, and at the time, it seemed to be working out well.

Dale circled back around with us recently to let us know how the rest of the painting process went. "In May I sanded the entire car down with 1000 grit and put two more coats of clear on it. Then sanded with 2000 grit, and buffed it, then finally, put the decals on. I did hire out having the screaming chicken put on the hood."

So did the redneck paint booth pay dividends? Find out.

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Classic Jeep Collection Displayed at SEMA

Posted November 12, 2014 9:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: classic auto collection display jeep

Omix-ADA bills itself as the world's largest Jeep parts and accessories supplier, so it stands to reason that the company knows a thing or two about Jeeps in all their variations. To prove this point, the company's SEMA exhibit featured a display of historic Jeep vehicles that helped to highlight the evolution of the compact SUV from wartime hero to civilian recreational vehicle.

Most prominent in the display was a 1971 Hurst Jeepster Commando, one of approximately 100 built by Jeep to attract a younger buyer to the Jeepster model.

So did it work? Did Jeep find a young audience with its style evolution?

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