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Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

1925 Ford Snow Flyer

Posted September 16, 2014 9:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: Conversion Ford model t snowmobile

The Ford Model T Snow Flyer is guaranteed to sleigh you! This one appeared in the January 1978 issue of Hemmings Motor News and was described as being in "A1″ condition, with a rebuilt motor, new battery, Warford transmission, high compression head, distributor, ignition, fat man steering wheel, new tires, and extra tires and wheels for replacing the front runners. The asking price was $3,500, which is around $12,700 today. These will pop up from time-to-time at various prices, and a snow flyer coupe sold for over $30,000 at RM's Hershey auction back in 2012.

The term "snowmobile" was thought to be coined by Virgil D. White back in 1913. As a Ford garage owner, he perfected the conversion kit that would allow the Model T to track through the winter snow. The model T snow conversion, at the time, was a utilitarian need for those living in the middle of nowhere, as many road systems were still in their infancy.

See this early "snowmobile" on Hemmings.

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D.O.D.G.E. – Detroit’s Old Diehards Go Everywhere

Posted September 15, 2014 9:30 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: anniversary centenial dodge history

November's issue of Hemmings Classic Car (#122) celebrates the 100th anniversary of one of America's greatest auto manufacturers. For this commemorative issue, we asked for your Dodge stories, and you delivered (and then some). We received hundreds of emails, letters, flash drives, discs and newspaper clippings illustrating your love and allegiance to the Dodge brand. We, of course, couldn't feature everything in that issue, but we felt we should show some of those that missed the cut in our blog.

Our readers' Dodge war stories are on Hemmings.

1 comments; last comment on 09/16/2014
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From Ball Bearings to Big-Blocks: AACA Museum Celebrates 100 Years of Dodge

Posted September 11, 2014 8:30 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: anniversary centennial dodge history

Perhaps it was their passion for all things mechanical that led the Dodge brothers to begin producing assemblies for the fledgling automotive industry, or perhaps it was growing up in a machine shop that specialized in marine engines. Whatever the cause, business-minded John Francis Dodge and technically-oriented Horace Elgin Dodge proved their mettle in the early days of the auto industry, rising from obscurity to prominence in a span of just 15 years, eventually becoming one of the largest automakers in America. Opening at the AACA Museum in Hershey, Pennsylvania, on September 26, a new temporary exhibit will help to commemorate 100 Years of Dodge.

See the history of America's bluest-collar automaker on Hemmings.

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And That’s the Truth: Frank Gripp’s Twin-Engine Diamond T

Posted September 10, 2014 9:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: classic auto display Truck

Lloyd J. Wolf might have been peddling his auxiliary power units for over-the-road trucks by then, but in the mid-1960s not everybody felt it necessary to purchase a Dynassist to increase their load-carrying potential, as we can see from this one-off 1957 Diamond T 730C cabover featuring an unconventional power-adder and some owner-executed rhinoplasty.

The Geppetto to this Pinocchio, Frank Gripp Sr., ran Gripp Trucking out of Annawan, Illinois, from the 1940s through the 1990s, specializing in grain hauling among the rural communities that dotted Route 6 - and later, Interstate 80 - in the northwestern part of the state. By the mid-1960s, he'd hired his son, Frank Gripp Jr., as a driver, and the younger noted how the 450-cu.in. International Harvester Red Diamond six-cylinder gas engine in the tag-axle cabover couldn't quite keep up with traffic.

Learn the origins of this unique truck on Hemmings.

3 comments; last comment on 09/14/2014
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Canada’s Oldest Automobile to go on Display at Canada’s Newest Concours

Posted September 09, 2014 9:30 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: Canada classic auto display

The crowd roared with laughter and derision at the cloud of steam that grew from the middle of the Stanstead Fairgrounds. Rather, to be specific, they chided the machine at the center of the cloud, a malfunctioning horseless carriage that local watchmaker Henry Seth Taylor had promised them would revolutionize the way they traveled. Nearly 150 years later, however, crowds at the Cobble Beach Concours d'Elegance will likely be a little less critical of what would become known as Canada's first automobile.

By the mid-1860s, plenty of steam-powered horseless carriages had emerged from workshops across Europe and the United States. Canada, however, didn't get its first recorded glimpse of one until 1864, when an unidentified steam carriage - likely one built by Sylvester Hayward Roper of Massachusetts and exhibited by carnival man W.W. Austen - made a tour of country fairs across New England and eastern Canada.

Learn about the oldest snowplow (kidding) here, on Hemmings.

3 comments; last comment on 09/09/2014
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Why Do We Sometimes Lack the Motivation to Work on Our Cars?

Posted September 08, 2014 12:00 AM by dstrohl

As I write this, I'm supposed to be working on my 1967 Buick GS 400. It's well after work hours and I promised myself I would dedicate some time to it tonight. However, a freak storm rolled in 45 minutes ago and caused lots of flash flooding in my area. It also flooded my patio, which in turn started pouring water into my house via the back door, so my son and I had to quickly dig a small trench around the back of the house to let the water run-off. Now I don't feel like working on the Buick and the usual "I didn't work on the car today and I should have" guilt is setting in.

Over the last never-ending winter, all I could think about was getting the Buick back to a turnkey cruiser again and I worked toward it. Now it's literally a couple days of work away from that, yet things keep coming up and it keeps sitting.

This is my driver, the car that's finished-if that statement can be true of any car-and it was supposed to provide carefree cruising all summer long. So far, it hasn't happened and summer is quickly coming to a close. More time would always help, but at this moment, motivation is what's lacking.

Get back in the garage on Hemmings.

27 comments; last comment on 09/10/2014
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