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Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

The $5,000 Challenge, “You Bought a What?” Edition

Posted July 30, 2015 9:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: classic auto classifieds

The beauty of the collector car hobby is this: there's something with wheels to satisfy (almost) everyone's taste. Used fire engines, while not practical daily (or weekend) drivers, enjoy a respectable following, as do professional cars, like those used in the funerary services. While this edition of the $5,000 Challenge features a few ordinary automobiles, others break from convention to offer a glimpse of what the guy-down-the-street might collect.

How about a classic fire engine for less than $5K?

12 comments; last comment on 07/31/2015
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Prewar Motoring – Driving a 1935 La Salle Through D.C. Traffic

Posted July 29, 2015 9:00 AM by dstrohl

This past May, while driving up to New York City to visit my family, I made a detour to the Washington D.C. area to photograph this lovely 1935 La Salle Convertible Coupe for my forthcoming Cadillac book. Owned by Cadillac collector Randy Denchfield, it's one of two '35 La Salles in his collection, and without question one of the finest in the country.

After our photo shoot commenced, Randy took me for a nice drive in and around his pleasant Chevy Chase neighborhood. With the top down, we were enjoying the spring sunshine and reveling in the beauty of the La Salle's distinctive styling. Then Randy pulled over and told me to take the wheel and experience the La Salle motoring experience firsthand.

Does this ultimate classic get stuck in federal gridlock?

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Unsalted: Bonneville Speed Week Canceled for Second Year Straight

Posted July 28, 2015 10:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: Bonneville raceway racing salt flats

The day when we will no longer see sanctioned racing on the Bonneville Salt Flats may soon be at hand after the Southern California Timing Association decided on Monday to cancel the Bonneville Speed Week for the second year in a row.

The announcement came after weeks of speculation and multiple visits to the salt flats by SCTA and Bureau of Land Management officials to determine whether enough salt remained to comprise a reasonable racing surface for this year's Speed Week, which was scheduled to begin August 8. Instead, hundreds of racers from around the world will now have to wait to see if other events in the short land-speed racing season at Bonneville will follow the same fate.

Has the slick salt from this famous racetrack washed away?

6 comments; last comment on 07/30/2015
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The Softer Side of Bonneville: Why It’s Not Always a Good Idea to Drive on the Salt Flats

Posted July 27, 2015 12:30 PM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: Bonneville raceway racing salt flats

About four miles north of Interstate 80, not far from the Utah-Nevada border, the Bonneville Salt Flats stretch out from the end of a two-lane access road into 44,000 acres of pale white flatness. The only relief comes from the stark Silver Island Mountains rimming the basin. Standing at the edge of the salt flats, it's not hard to conjure up images of Craig Breedlove or Gary Gabelich blasting across at 600 miles an hour.

Every year, people come from all over the world to have a go at the salt flats - let's get the family Ford out there and see what she'll do on this piece of utter wasteland where there are no speed limits.

Take the family car to the middle of nowhere and push it to the limits.

2 comments; last comment on 07/28/2015
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What’s Your Automotive Obsession?

Posted July 23, 2015 9:00 AM by dstrohl

There are cars that are easy to love, at least under the right circumstances. On a sunny day, with the top down, few automobiles are as enjoyable as a light and nimble convertible; in knee-deep snow, a capable SUV can deliver peace of mind (and occasionally, too much confidence); and when one just has to punctuate a mood with parallel strips of melted rubber on asphalt, only a muscle car will do. Sometimes, however, attraction isn't easily explained - or easily dissuaded.

In the interest of full disclosure, I've always had a thing for late third-generation Corvettes, yet I suspect any stock example will leave me disappointed, wanting more power and better handling. As sports cars go, they're too heavy to be nimble, perhaps a forgivable sin if ample power was on tap. Thanks to the emission regulations of the day, it wasn't, and in 1980, the last year the third-gen Corvette was available with a manual transmission and the L82 V-8, output was 230 horsepower and 275 pound-feet of torque. Sure, the aftermarket provides plenty of parts to make this era of Corvette faster and better-handling, but later model Corvettes can provide a better starting point for less money and effort.

What floats your boats fuels your car?

8 comments; last comment on 07/28/2015
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The “King of the Hill,” the 1990 Corvette ZR-1, Marks its 25th Anniversary

Posted July 22, 2015 9:00 AM by dstrohl

In late 1987, rumors of an all-new, high performance Corvette built upon the fourth generation platform began circulating among the automotive press. Dubbed the "King of the Hill," the secretive supercar was said to be a world-beater, and in March of 1989, GM debuted its impressive Corvette ZR-1 at the Geneva Motor Show. This year marks the 25th anniversary of the ZR-1's market debut, and while a mere 6,939 were ever built, the car remains a memorable piece of Corvette history, as well as a bridge from performance Corvettes past to the present.

The 1990 Corvette finally gets classic treatment.

1 comments; last comment on 07/23/2015
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