CR4 - The Engineer's Place for News and Discussion ®



Speaking of Precision

Speaking of Precision is a knowledge preservation and thought leadership blog covering the precision machining industry, its materials and services. With over 36 years of hands on experience in steelmaking, manufacturing, quality, and management, Miles Free (Milo) Director of Industry Research and Technology at PMPA helps answer "How?" "With what?" and occasionally "Really?"

PMPA Selected as National Partner to Grow Apprenticeships in Manufacturing

Posted December 21, 2016 10:00 AM by Milo

PMPA is proud to be partnering with NIMS, to help companies find new ways to help students and workers gain skills for success.

Apprenticeships to build a pipeline of skilled professionals for a great manufacturing career.

The National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) has been selected by the U.S.Department of Labor as an industry intermediary to support the expansion of registered apprenticeships within MANUFACTURING. The Precision Machined Products Association (PMPA) a founding stakeholder member of NIMS, will work with NIMS to increase access to apprenticeships and assist employers in developing new programs that reach diverse talent pools among our membership. As part of this initiative, $500,000 is available to support companies in establishing a registered apprenticeship program with the Department of Labor.

“For over two decades, NIMS has worked with companies, workforce development groups and community colleges to stand-up high-caliber apprenticeship programs across the country,” said Jim Wall, Executive Director, NIMS. “This contract gives us the unique opportunity to create more impact in our industry by expanding apprenticeships to underrepresented populations and to new companies looking to establish a sustainable talent pipeline.”

What’s in it for your company? NIMS will focus on providing companies with tools and resources to develop customized registered apprenticeship programs. These programs combine on-the-job training with job-related classroom instruction and meet national standards for registration with the Department of Labor or State Apprenticeship Agencies. PMPA is working with NIMS to help facilitate the creation of registered apprenticeships for our member companies.

If you are interested in enhancing your talent pipeline through apprenticeships, this program may be for you.

Companies that are interested in building an apprenticeship program or organizations that are interested in partnering with NIMS should contact Sterling Gill sgill@pmpa.org; for more information go to www.mfgapprenticeship.com or email the NIMS ApprenticeshipUSA team at apprenticeship@nims-skills.org.

1 comments; last comment on 12/21/2016
View comments

Thread Rolling Thin Walls--CJ Winters

Posted December 07, 2016 10:00 AM by Milo

Guest post by Lib Pietrantoni, CJWinter

Flaking threads and thread damage can be avoided when thread rolling thin walled parts.

Distortion during the thread rolling process can cause

  • Flaking,
  • Non-uniform thread geometry
  • Tearing
  • Collapse of threaded portion of part

These are particularly troublesome issues on thin walled parts.

These can be avoided if you assure that a minimum wall thickness is maintained for the process.

Minimum Wall Thickness is determined by Nominal Thread Diameter and Thread Pitch

Larger nominal thread diameters require thicker minimum wall thickness; so do coarser thread pitches.

The way that you roll the thread can also be a factor.

According to Lib Pietrantoni at CJWinter, specialized pneumatic radial-pinch-type thread rolling machine attachments can apply equalized rolling pressure across the workpiece, ensuring thread concentricity, eliminating side pressure on both the parts and the machine, and allowing precise control of the penetration rate — especially important for thin-walled parts.

You can download the Thread Rolling Reference Chart at CJWinter’s website: reference chart

As a steel mill Quality Metallurgist, I saw my share of complaints that “the steel was flaking- it must be the steel.”

But the lab results never found the flaking anywhere except where the thread had been rolled – it was never on the bars as shipped.

Pay attention to minimum wall thickness when thread rolling!

And don’t forget to pass this handy chart along to the engineer at your customer that is designing the parts that you make.

Thanks to Lib Pietrantoni at PMPA member CJWinter for providing this reference information.


Editor's note: CR4 would like to thank Milo for sharing his blog, which can also be read here.

1 comments; last comment on 12/09/2016
View comments

Ten Points Worth Sharing--Cleveland Area OSHA Director Howie Eberts

Posted October 15, 2016 1:00 PM by Milo
Pathfinder Tags: osha safety tips

We attended a presentation at WIRE-Net by Cleveland OSHA Area Director Howie Eberts. Howie did a great job of giving attendees a thoughtful, human view of how and why OSHA does what it does in his district.

Informative slides were the foundation of his talk, but the takeaways revealed some interesting insights into our joint (Companies and OSHA) efforts toward employee safety.

We all have shared responsibility for safety.

1) Safety is important- not just for ourselves, but also for our families that are counting on us.

2) On the job fatalities have declined substantially from 1974 to the present- but there are still too many.

3) Most OSHA inspections are conducted without notice.

4) In Cleveland region, 85% of inspections are a result of employee complaints.

5) Be very careful posting photos on your websites or literature- If someone is obviously in the shop without wearing their required PPE…

6) It‘s your company-

  • Why wouldn’t you want to have a prepared written plan for how your company will respond to a serious injury or fatality?
  • It’s not unreasonable to assert your rights
  • You DESERVE to be treated with respect
  • So do our Field Agents
  • How you treat our officers is on you

7) OSHA does have the right to interview your employees privately

8) To prove employee misconduct you need to prove all four:

  • You have a work rule
  • The rule is communicated to all employees
  • You monitor compliance
  • You issue discipline for noncompliance

9) If the agent tries to expand the scope and you don’t understand why, ask them to clarify why, if you still don’t understand, ask to speak with Howie

10) The facts show that the most dangerous thing that any of us do involves a motor vehicle; roadway incidents alone accounted for nearly one out of every four fatal work injuries.

We took a number of specific actionable tips and insights away from his presentation that we’ll be sharing exclusively with our PMPA members.

Photo credit: http://www.medinacountysafetycouncil.com/

Wire-Net: https://www.wire-net.org/


Editor's note: CR4 would like to thank Milo for sharing his blog, which can also be read here.

8 comments; last comment on 10/18/2016
View comments

OSHA’s Top Ten Most Frequently Cited Standards: FY 2015

Posted August 12, 2016 11:11 AM by Milo
Pathfinder Tags: osha penalty regulation

OSHA Penalties increased 78% August 1, 2016.

Think of your efforts here as an investment in “Penalty Prevention.”

The following is a list of the top 10 most frequently cited standards following inspections of worksites by federal OSHA for Fiscal Year 2015.

  1. 1926.501 – Fall Protection (C)
  2. 1910.1200 – Hazard Communication
  3. 1926.451 – Scaffolding (C)
  4. 1910.134 – Respiratory Protection
  5. 1910.147 – Lockout/Tagout
  6. 1910.178 – Powered Industrial Trucks
  7. 1926.1053 – Ladders (C)
  8. 1910.305 – Electrical, Wiring Methods
  9. 1910.212 – Machine Guarding
  10. 1910.303 – Electrical, General Requirements

Note, the standards that are numbered 1926.XXX – Numbers 1. Fall protection, 3. Scaffolding, and 7. Ladders, are Construction industry, rather than General Industry. Nevertheless, Fall Protection and Ladders are relevant in our manufacturing shops as well. Source: Top Ten Standards 2015

In our work with shops involved in OSHA inspections, we have learned that failure to have documented training and evidence is the more likely to be the root cause of the citation. You must train and you must be able to provide documentary evidence of the training.

A savvy management will take steps in their shops to find and fix recognized hazards addressed in these and other standards before OSHA shows up.

Action Steps:

  1. Electrical-On your next walk around the shop, look for outlets and power boxes that are not in good condition and schedule their repair ASAP. If you can see wiring or damage- that is likely a violation.
  2. Machine GuardingThis is a particular area of OSHA emphasis. Are all provided guards in place, or are they being removed or defeated? Each instance would be a violation.
  3. Lockout/TagoutThis too is an OSHA emphasis and on their regulatory agenda for review. Now would be a good time to review that all affected employees have been trained. That evidence exists of that training. And that you have audited to assure performance. (If I went into your shop and saw a machine undergoing a major changeover, would I find it locked out?)

Photocredit


Editor's Note: CR4 would like to thank Milo for sharing this blog entry, which you can also read here.

2 comments; last comment on 08/13/2016
View comments

Thinking Precision, Thinking Big: Keystone Threaded Products

Posted June 21, 2016 2:00 PM by Milo

The Team at Keystone Threaded Products shows us that “Precision” doesn’t necessarily mean “Tiny” as they thread the ends of some 20 foot long, 10 inch stainless steel bars for a Metalworking press. The thread is a 10-1/4″ : 4 UNJ RH applied to each end of the 3 and a half ton bar.

20 feet long, two ends to thread, 3 and a half tons of precision.

At Keystone, they roll the thread form onto the material which makes for a stronger thread. Alignment and following the process is critical to assure a good thread.

Thread rolls create the thread form on the work piece.

Multiple passes are needed to build the thread up to the proper dimensions.

Half a million pounds of pressure are imparted on the rolls to plastically move the steel of the bar into the thread form. Read the gage.

Obviously it takes knowledge, skills, and experience to apply half million pounds to produce precision work.

Rich says that he’s rolled larger bars, but skills and experience and a great team to work with create the can do spirit that makes precision manufacturing a great career.

Here’s another look at a finished bar. Precision does not necessarily mean tiny!

Just another point of view so you can see the size of the work.

Thanks to Betsy Minnick and the Team at PMPA member Keystone Threaded Products for showing us that “Precision” is not a synonym for “Tiny.”


Editor's Note: CR4 would like to thank Milo for sharing this blog entry, which you can also read here.

4 comments; last comment on 06/27/2016
View comments


Previous in Blog: Alternative Career Plans if College Doesn’t Come Through  
Show all Blog Entries in this Blog

Advertisement