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Coatings & Surface Engineering

The Coatings & Surface Engineering is the place for conversation and discussion about coatings; substrate modifications; cleaning and surface preparation; and friction, lubrication and wear. Here, you'll find everything from application ideas, to news and industry trends, to hot topics and cutting edge innovations.

Defects Actually Strengthen Roman-era Concrete

Posted January 23, 2017 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

Small defects known as screw dislocations help account for the superiority of the Roman Empire's concrete. These defects provide small-scale plasticity that allows hardened concrete to adjust to stress over time. Researchers say that this new knowledge paves the way for designing stronger concrete and other complex materials.


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7 comments; last comment on 01/25/2017
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Turning Jackets into Solar-powered Wearables

Posted December 14, 2016 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

Researchers have developed a technology that uses solar cells to turn clothing into a source for limitless energy. Researchers say one day this technology could improve how soldiers in the field operate or even how smartphones are charged — maybe by simply slipping it into your pocket.


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Coating Enables an Unobstructed View into the Human Body

Posted November 18, 2016 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

Camera-guided endoscopes help clinicians look inside the body to diagnose and treat many different conditions. Researchers have engineered a transparent surface coating based on the slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS) technology. SLIPS can create self-cleaning surfaces that resist almost any fouling. To develop the technology for endoscopic use, the team needed to adapt SLIPS specifically to endure the harsh environment of a living body's cavities.


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Hydrogel That Doesn't Dry Out Could Be Used for Artificial Skin

Posted September 16, 2016 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

Engineers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have created a way to keep hydrogels hydrated, using a technique that could lead to longer-lasting contact lenses, stretchy microfluidic devices, flexible bioelectronics, and even artificial skin. Inspired by the nature of human skin, the researchers devised a method to bind hydrogels to elastic polymers such as rubber and silicone that are stretchy like hydrogels, yet impervious to water. Coating the hydrogels with this thin elastomer layer provides a water-trapping barrier that keeps the hydrogel moist and flexible.


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Bioactive Film Improves How Implants Bond with Bone

Posted August 25, 2016 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

Researchers from several universities have developed a technique for coating polymer implants with a bioactive film that significantly increases bonding between the implant and surrounding bone. The polymer, polyether ether ketone, also known as PEEK, has properties that make it appealing for use in implants, but it doesn't bond well with bone. The research team tested several methods to coat the polymer, including using a thin film of yttria-stabilized zirconia followed by a coating of hydroxyapatite. The team then heated the coating with microwaves, which makes the crystalline hydroxyapatite structure more stable in the body and more capable of bonding with bone.


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1 comments; last comment on 08/29/2016
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