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Acoustics & Audio Technology

The Acoustics & Audio Technology Blog is the place for conversation and discussion about speakers and amplifiers, acoustic materials, signal measurement and processing and mobile & handheld devices as used in the audio industry. Here, you'll find everything from application ideas, to news and industry trends, to hot topics and cutting edge innovations.

LG's Bluetooth Speaker Plays Music, Floats in the Air

Posted January 17, 2017 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

The futuristic Levitating Portable Speaker from LG Electronics is catching stares at CES 2017. The 360 degree omnidirectional speaker employs a turbine blade-inspired design and generates deep bass, mid-range, and high tones.


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3 comments; last comment on 01/20/2017
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From the Man Who Invented Wireless In-ear Technology

Posted December 06, 2016 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

When you invent something truly revolutionary, you may find imperfections that make you take a second look. This article profiles Stephen Ambrose, whose wireless in-ear monitors made a huge hit with a host of A-list musicians, including Stevie Wonder, Simon and Garfunkel, Joan Baez, and many others. But when he discovered that the first version of his creation increased the wearer's risk of hearing loss by 77%, he invented new version.


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Boosting Light Intensity with Sound

Posted October 01, 2016 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

Light and sound represent different types of energy, right? Not so fast, say these researchers from Yale University, whose new waveguide system allows controlling the interactions between them without sacrificing amplification. Although not a new concept, until now chips lacked the technology to implement it. Applications include fiber-optic communications and signal processing.


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3 comments; last comment on 10/02/2016
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Fooling People with Simulated Sounds

Posted July 20, 2016 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

In a scene that contains sound and pictures, can you tell if they both come from the same source? Many movie sound effects originated as actual sounds (filmmakers still use one classic movie splash from a recording of real sounds made in the 1940s) or sounds that some human sound technician creates (think "A Prairie Home Companion"). This article examines work at MIT to get computers to listen to an actual sound, synthesize it, and adjust it to match particular visual cues. The simulated sounds fool many people. But much work remains. The system still can't mimic a fast drum roll or construct all sounds from a complicated environment.


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1 comments; last comment on 07/20/2016
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Sensing Water Leaks by Their Sound

Posted May 20, 2016 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

In a world suffering water shortages that promise only to get worse, simply detecting and correcting leaks in existing infrastructure can improve the situation considerably. Since leaks in valves or pipes sound different from freely flowing water, detecting those differences has become imperative. This article examines available sound-detection techniques. Some solutions place detectors on pipe exteriors. But ambient noise, pipe diameters, pipe materials, and other realities of physics and fluid mechanics compromise the effectiveness of such efforts. Instead, these companies search for leaks with tethered and untethered hydrophones (water-bound microphones) that travel with the water inside the pipes, finding leaks even far underground, such as under railroad tracks or rivers.


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5 comments; last comment on 05/25/2016
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