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Display Technologies

The Display Technologies Blog is the place for conversation and discussion about LCD Displays, OLEDs and LEDs, Mobile Electronics and Touchscreens & Imaging. Here, you'll find everything from application ideas, to news and industry trends, to hot topics and cutting edge innovations.

Sharp Eyes $7 Billion Plant Investment

Posted February 23, 2017 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

Sharp will take the lead in the joint construction of a liquid crystal display panel plant in the U.S. with Taiwan's Foxconn Technology Group, an executive at the Japanese electronics maker said. Japan is finalizing a package that it claims will create 700,000 jobs in the U.S. and help create a $450 billion market.


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Wearable Display Lets You Watch TV While You Work

Posted January 02, 2017 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

Vufine+ is a wearable display developed by a small, creative company dedicated to building simple and accessible wearable technology. The gadget's primary focus is on the display itself, so it offers a picture quality crisp enough to read text and watch videos.


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16 comments; last comment on 01/04/2017
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The Latest in Back-to-School Fashion?

Posted August 31, 2016 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

Smart kids (and adults, too!) may just be sporting "smart" clothes — if not this September, then soon. Researchers predict the smart clothing market, deemed the "next generation of wearables," will top 18 million clothing articles annually by 2021.
Some of the most practical? A jacket will incorporate sensor grids on the sleeve that allow wearers to control certain smartphone apps, and safety clothing will integrate LED lighting that looks like a runner or bicyclist. Technology on the horizon includes cost-efficient sensors printed directly on textiles. Transparent, flexible, and as thin as human hair, the sensors would permit more freedom in smart garment design.


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1 comments; last comment on 08/31/2016
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A Display in the Palm of Your Hand

Posted June 28, 2016 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

Did you ever write someone's phone number on your hand? The newest smart device interface could take you back to those simpler times. It uses the top of the user's hand as a touch screen interface and the palm as a display. SkinHaptics, developed in a University of Sussex-led study, creates tactile sensations on the palm with ultrasound sent through the hand without interrupting the display. It also serves as a touch-only interface when the user doesn't need to see the display. For instance, someone riding a bicycle could adjust the music volume on a smartwatch without looking with one touch to their hand.


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1 comments; last comment on 06/28/2016
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Pop-up Ads Can Now Follow You Into the Real World

Posted May 04, 2016 8:12 AM by HUSH

For someone who lives so close to large metropolitan areas, billboards are a common sight. So much so that even though I regularly see up to several dozen in a single day, I couldn't recall the advertisements or products on a single one. Yet, when I make my way past Albany (and CR4 HQ) and find myself in Vermont, I almost certainly notice the absence of billboards.

Vermont is one of four states, the others being Hawaii, Alaska and Maine, that outright ban such oversized advertisements. It's not a coincidence that all these states have a reputation for natural beauty. States with boring drives (looking at you Plains states) typically support billboards as they may prevent highway hypnosis.

Yet in the Hudson Valley, billboards are prominent near any city, route or highway. And when you go further south towards New York City, billboards stop being a decoration and become potentially intrusive as they monitor the behaviors of passersby.

Clear Channel is an advertising company with thousands of billboards across the nation. In its 11 largest markets, CC has already rolled out RADAR, a data monitoring and analytics tool. The billboard recognizes who walks or drives past a billboard, and then compares this to what a passerby did following exposure to the billboard.

CC does this with the help of AT&T, who obviously route nearby cell signals through the billboard, which collects user data. With the help of data aggregating software, such as PlaceIQ and Placed, CC can determine if the billboard might have inspired someone to watch a particular TV show or visit a store.

For a real world example: an AT&T customer walks past a billboard in Times Square, on his or her way to an off-Broadway show. In conjunction with the PlaceIQ or Placed, CC now has access to how long he or she were at show and where he/she went to eat afterwards, and if he or she walked past that billboard again on the way home.

This will enable CC billboard customers to better target demographics and quantify billboard influences--think of it as the everlasting CR4 pop-up, albeit in the real world. Eventually, digital billboards that can swap advertisements billboards might begin targeting specific people who walk by, especially those who might have thousands of social media friends.

CC promises that all data is kept anonymous and that users can opt-out, and truthfully there are plenty of user data aggregating techniques that are as provocative or worse. Clear Channel is planning on rolling RADAR out across the entire country and the fact that so many once passive advertisements are becoming active data collectors has brought the attention of some officials.

It's important to note that this isn't the first wave of billboards that began recording who looked at them, but the fact that AT&T customer movements are being tracked for advertising analytics by their cell phone feels very 1984.

4 comments; last comment on 05/06/2016
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