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Scientific Instruments

The Scientific Instruments Blog is the place for conversation and discussion about spectroscopy and chromatography, microscopy and imaging, industrial applications, and metrology and calibration. Here, you'll find everything from application ideas, to news and industry trends, to hot topics and cutting edge innovations.

Webb Telescope Passes Cryo Tests, Now "Optically Complete"

Posted August 18, 2016 1:19 PM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope has passed yet another barrage of tests, bringing it closer to its scheduled launch in October 2018. The latest round includes cryogenic testing on the telescope's science cameras and spectrographs as well as the installation of the final flight mirrors. Webb's scientific instruments will have to endure a bumpy ride out of Earth's atmosphere and a long trip to its final destination: an orbit a million miles away from home and at a frigid 40 K (- 87 F).


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High Voltage Power for Mass Spectrometry

Posted July 26, 2016 12:00 AM by SavvyExacta
Pathfinder Tags: mass spectrometry

In mass spectrometry, high-accuracy, high-resolution sample analysis correlates closely with high-performance high voltage. High voltage not only plays a critical role in the ion creation and acceleration phase, but all the way through separation, detection, measurement, and analysis. Performance failure at any phase could jeopardize the entire sample run.

Different tool architectures can be optimized with the right high voltage power supplies and amplifiers. High voltage power supply integration is important to all system elements.

Accuracy and resolution can be significantly improved by correctly matching a high voltage system with the task at hand.

Any thoughts about mass spectrometry and the critical relationship of high voltage? Leave your thoughts below or share them during the webinar. Questions asked during the webinar may be answered live!


If you're interested in learning more about this topic, please join James Morrison of Advanced Energy Industries, Inc. for a free webinar on high voltage power for mass spectrometry.

Webinar Details:

July 28 - Thursday (also available on-demand for 90 days after the live broadcast)

12:00 PM EDT - 1:00 PM EDT

View the Webinar

2 comments; last comment on 07/27/2016
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Interact with Your Smartwatch Using Sonar Technology

Posted April 25, 2016 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

Now, the same technology used to find fish and submerged treasure can help people interact with their mobile devices and smartwatches. Computer scientists and electrical engineers from the University of Washington have developed sonar technology, called FingerIO, that lets people interact with tiny-screen devices by writing or gesturing on any nearby surface, such as a tabletop, paper, or even in mid-air. Sounds like science fiction, but FingerIO actually uses sound science - it leverages a smart device's microphone and speakers to bounce signals off the moving finger, record the echoes, and then calculate the finger motions in space.


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Simple Solution Gives Standard Scopes Super Resolution

Posted November 19, 2015 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

Scientists will soon see single molecules as they never have before, thanks to a cost-effective new technology from The Wyss Institute of Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University. The Institute is launching a new startup, Ultivue, to commercialize the technology - target-specific imaging reagents that improve the imaging capabilities of standard single-molecule microscopes. The new reagents take advantage of the physical properties of carefully designed nucleotide sequences in complementary strands of DNA, one attached to the target and the other to a fluorescent dye.


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New Instruments Study Microscopic Magnetos

Posted October 08, 2015 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

Magnetotactic bacteria are found in both fresh and salt water, and feature unique organelles that contain nano-sized iron crystals, making the bacteria swim in the direction of the Earth's magnetic field. These little compass needles are valuable to scientists studying layers of sedimentary rock, but the elaborate electromagnetic systems used to observe them have proven problematic. Now, researchers have developed a simple but effective tool for monitoring the bacteria's movement by using a single permanent magnet positioned on top of a series of rotating gears. The beauty of this simple system is that it can be used with any light microscope and it doesn't require a hefty power supply to create the magnetic field.


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1 comments; last comment on 10/11/2015
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