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7 comments

Periodic Table Gets Updated

Posted January 17, 2011 7:59 AM

The Periodic Table is about to undergo an historic change, with the atomic weights of ten elements that make up the universe getting an update. Improved analytic techniques allow scientists to more accurately measure the atomic weights of these elements. Chart numbers, standard for over a century, will be altered, with important research implications in such areas as determining food purity, tracing environmental pollutants, and developing new pharmaceuticals. How will these changes affect your field of work?

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Guru
Hobbies - DIY Welding - New Member, but planning to be an Old Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United States - US - Statue of Liberty - 56 Year Member

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#1

Re: Periodic Table Gets Updated

01/17/2011 5:09 PM

An update to the Periodic Table, eh?

Unobtanium and Eludium will take their rightful places at long last. There will be many new possibilities with these elements.

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Anonymous Poster
#2
In reply to #1

Re: Periodic Table Gets Updated

01/17/2011 10:35 PM

And we can hope they finally got Administratium and Managerium corrected as well. And the trucking industry can rejoice that the properties of Gravitonium have been detailed. It makes a truck heavy going down hills, light going up hills, and always legal and balanced on the DOT Scales.

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Guru

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#3
In reply to #1

Re: Periodic Table Gets Updated

01/17/2011 10:37 PM

An Alloy of the two...

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Power-User

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#4
In reply to #3

Re: Periodic Table Gets Updated

01/18/2011 1:22 AM

These are the only 2, that when alloyed, becomes a new element ... noneum.

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Anonymous Poster
#5

Re: Periodic Table Gets Updated

01/18/2011 8:41 AM

"Oh-kiddle-ee-doh-kee, then..."

How long before we can see these updates reflected on the Wiki-Periodic-Table ...?

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Commentator
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#6

Re: Periodic Table Gets Updated

01/18/2011 5:07 PM

I would suggest Potterium and Weasleyium. Only we will have a problem with You-Know-Who : should it be Voldemortium or Riddleium?

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Guru
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#7

Re: Periodic Table Gets Updated

01/23/2011 12:28 PM

Wow what a non-story this is. I guess that one should expect this of reporters that have only a high school education in Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics. The only thing that they've done here is add the statistical spread in masses that one should expect because those ten elements have multiple stable elements. What does surprise me from the article that nobody here noticed is that the difference between natural and synthetic testosterone detection is based on the atomic mass of the testosterone. If this is the only measured difference attributed to a doping claim then I seriously question the validity of the test.

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