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4 comments

Are Fixed-speed Motor Drives Obsolete?

Posted April 17, 2011 9:01 AM

Motor drive upgrades are an easy way to boost plant performance. Given the energy-saving, efficiency-first environment of today's production line, will advanced motor controls eventually displace most conventional fixed-speed motor drives? Put another way: If your ultimate goal is to bring product to market faster, cheaper, and more efficiently, why would you specify a fixed-speed motor drive?

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#1

Re: Are Fixed-speed Motor Drives Obsolete?

04/17/2011 12:10 PM

Economics, for one.

I have five screw compressors totaling 2050 hp. They are fixed speed with slide-valve capacity control. Reduced speed via VFD would be somewhat more efficient, but way costlier.

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Re: Are Fixed-speed Motor Drives Obsolete?

04/17/2011 11:43 PM

Would a "fixed speed motor drive" be called a "switch"?

Thousands of motors in fans, domestic appliances, small water pumps and so on where the complexity only adds risk of failure.

In answer to the topic question. No!

There are many facilities where I would specify a fixed speed motor drive. (There are some where I definately would not, based on the loading and the process needs.)

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#3

Re: Are Fixed-speed Motor Drives Obsolete?

04/19/2011 7:05 AM

Advance motor controls are designed to vary output depending on varying changes in work load or to change motor speed. If there is no varying load and no need to change speed of motor. There is no need to add the additional cost. It maybe to some advantage to use their soft start feature in some applications but not all.

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#4

Re: Are Fixed-speed Motor Drives Obsolete?

05/05/2011 1:32 AM

I agree with you

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