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11 comments

Everyone Pitching In

Posted December 15, 2011 8:06 AM

Whether it's in response to or despite consumer demands for a "Green" Olympics, Coca-Cola hopes to reclaim all the plastic soda and water bottle it sells at the 2012 games in London. That's 80 million clear PET bottles. Is this an achievable goal?

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Power-User

Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Thailand
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#1

Re: Everyone Pitching In

12/16/2011 12:14 AM

Topical topic!

"Northern Territory Chief Minister Paul Henderson has been on the receiving end of Coke's harassment due to his government's moves to introduce container deposit recycling. In a message to GetUp members he says: "In the lead up to our container deposit legislation, Coca Cola and its beverage industry allies, ran a well-funded public misinformation campaign against Cash for Containers.


We have seen political intimidation. We heard false claims that container labels would take 2 years to change, only to now find Coca Cola producing individually named cans and bottles. And now we face the threat of legal challenge."
More at getup.org.au and at : www.boomerangalliance.org.au/

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Guru

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#2

Re: Everyone Pitching In

12/16/2011 1:13 AM

Authorities should make sure that garbage/trash is sorted prior to sending for recycling or making biogas or landfill.

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#3

Re: Everyone Pitching In

12/16/2011 1:36 AM

This will only be an achievable goal if it is heavily subsidized by Coca-Cola. In the USA, even with an added charge to encourage recycling the program doesn't pay for itself. In California it is possible for a consumer to recover the entire CRV charge of $0.05 USD for containers under 24 fl. oz., $0.10 USD for larger containers, but most serious recyclers take their bottles and cans to a recycling center in bulk. Our church takes beverage containers to a local recycler, who paid $1.75 USD per pound for clean, dry aluminum cans and $0.93 USD for PTFE bottles in the same condition at the time of our last visit in July, 2011. A small truck filled with bags of crushed bottles and cans piled three feet over the sides of the bed and tied down represented a year's accumulation, and netted us slightly more than $150.00 USD.

Unless you are desperate for cash or very dedicated to the idea of sparing the landfills you won't bother. A successful recycling campaign needs to begin with an extensive and incessant program of re-education and should begin at an early age. It's much too late to sell most adults on the idea, and the paltry amounts that can be realized by selling recyclables to a redemption center are an entirely insufficient inducement to take the trouble.

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#4

Re: Everyone Pitching In

12/16/2011 1:41 AM

Whilst Coke has a potentially achievable goal - the key to this is educating people (locals and visitors) to recycle the bottles.

Additionally recycling bins MUST be made available throughout London, and emptied frequently to achieve even part of this goal.

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#5

Re: Everyone Pitching In

12/16/2011 6:50 AM

Its not difficult, we already do it here with huge success because for each bottle or can, whether metal, glass or plastic, you pay extra 25 cents or so for each container.

Any shop selling that product can take it back and refund that money AUTOMATICALLY!!!

How you may ask?

The machines identify the bottles, I believe using some form of Laser scanning (or similar, it works with or without the label too). In action, a bottle is placed in a hole in the machine and it is identified, or not, and either taken in and stored, or partially pushed out for customer removal.

The pet bottles and cans are shredded to cut down the volume and the re-usable glass bottles are placed into crates and pushed out the back of the machine.

A lower step takes partial or full crates.

The sum of the monetary values of all crates bottles and cans is printed out and given to the customer, who uses it as part payment or simple refund at the checkout......

The only human hands involved (forgetting for the moment the removal of full containers eventually) are the customer's hands....

At the Olympics, believe me, any bottles not returned by the customer and discarded are quickly found by bums, Tramps and Kids, who gladly return them themselves!!! A win-win situation.

I hope this helps.

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#6
In reply to #5

Re: Everyone Pitching In

12/16/2011 5:50 PM

Yep give me a 25 cent refund for every can or plastic bottle I can find and I guarantee they would not end up in the scrap pile or boiler here.

The big thing is that given the gross markup that vending machines have over the normal retail cost could more than carry the 25 cent return costs. Around here a 20 oz soda costs less than $1 at the store but sell for about $1.75 - $2.00 at public vending machines and $2.50 if its a big event location.

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#7
In reply to #6

Re: Everyone Pitching In

12/16/2011 5:57 PM

I doubt that Coca Cola will make a loss!!!

The prices will reflect the money they must pay to even BE there......I bet over $2.00 per bottle/can myself......

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#8
In reply to #5

Re: Everyone Pitching In

12/16/2011 11:32 PM

The recycle industry uses an inclined conveyor/s running at an optimum speed, along with magnets to separate out heavy and magnetic materials, glass, paper and plastic. Each, because of its mass, will fly off the conveyor in its own trajectory and be caught by a specific trough. For higher value recoverables (glass, plastic, metal, cardboard), the presorted waste is sent down a conveyor manned by workers who hand pick the unwanted "fluff". At a waste recovery plant near me, they then burn the residual waste in an on-site co-gen plant. Initially they had a problem with the odor coming from the stack but that has been rectified. This facility previously was the cement plant that produced essentially all the cement used to build the Panama Canal and much of it that was sent to Europe during World War II.

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#9
In reply to #8

Re: Everyone Pitching In

12/17/2011 4:37 AM

If you are mixing up such a waste system and what I wrote, you are making a big mistake.

The system I descibed is found in every supermarket here in Germany for bottle and can retun of the deposit taken at the point of sale, so that the customers get their deposit back....usually two machines sit side by side. Do you want photos?

The metal is eventually sent to somewhere like you mentioned, the huge bales of PET plastic are sent to the far east, where it is turned into fleece jackets etc., and comes back as cheap cold weather garments.

PET is a versatile material!!!

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#10
In reply to #9

Re: Everyone Pitching In

12/17/2011 6:21 PM

I understand the system you are describing. A few states here have that in place. I was referring to general trash pickup in communities that don't have residential recycling programs. I'm not familiar with New York City's' handling of trash but there are general trash receptacles on practically every street corner. The mix of trash collected would require sorting. That type of system could be employed in London, if it already isn't. That way, even if Olympic visitors carried their bottles and cans away from the venue and into the streets, they could deposit them at any street corner and they would be recoverable when sorted. To put a bounty on the bottles and cans would require great infrastructure expenditure and would require people to go out of their way to seek a reimbursement kiosk all for one or two items. As you are aware, most kiosks are now located at grocery stores and people bring bags full at a time, making it worth while since most are there to shop anyway. I'm sure many people wouldn't cross the street for 5 or 10 cents. (insert local currency denomination)

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#11
In reply to #10

Re: Everyone Pitching In

12/18/2011 5:54 AM

I think that you can safely say that such systems are in use in most civilized countries anyway.....the UK being a little behind Germany for example.

In Germany we are forbidden to drop old batteries in the rubbish, there are collection boxes in all shops where batteries are sold. I collect mine and dump them there once or twice a year.

We have 3 rubbish bins:- Green or brown for compost, Black for general rubbish, Blue for paper, plastic and metal is put into specially suppled (free) yellow bags, also for collection.

At collection points locally you can give up old fridges and any other electrical/electronic goods, old furniture, large amounts of garden rubbish, large amounts of paper and metal for free.

Only building rubble costs money, a few cents per kilo, first 200 Kgs. are also free....

Inspectors go around and look into bins and you get fined if you put stuff in the wrong ones....

It still goes through sorting systems as well.....

I don't know of another country that takes so much trouble as Germany does, but I am fully prepared to learn differently!!! I am sure that we could be even better....

There are still plenty of places that need to up the anti as quickly as possible, I was shocked that people still throw batteries in the normal rubbish in the USA/UK, but make a big deal about collecting cans!?! Which can be machine sorted most easily and provide funds, batteries are more difficult and many are poisonous for the environment.

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Andy Germany (4); bubbapebi (1); Jaguar (2); Phil D. (1); pnaban (1); Stuart21 (1); tcmtech (1)

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