CR4 - The Engineer's Place for News and Discussion®

Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

Previous in Blog: A Vespa That Traffic Won’t Mess With   Next in Blog: What More Could They Ask the Corvair to Do?
Close

Comments Format:






Close

Subscribe to Discussion:

CR4 allows you to "subscribe" to a discussion
so that you can be notified of new comments to
the discussion via email.

Close

Rating Vote:







Project HMX - Slowdown

Posted May 08, 2012 9:00 AM by dstrohl

When I first brought out Project HMX after its winter slumber, I noted some brake issues - they felt soft and would lock up when I really jumped on them. But under normal braking, they seemed passable. Maybe the brake fluid in the lines had just absorbed some moisture while the car sat over the winter, I thought, so I bled the brakes all around and took it for another test drive. Still soft. Bled again, still soft. What's going on here?

What I neglected to do while bleeding the brakes was to perform a visual inspection of the entire brake system. Had I done that, I would have seen the paint peeling from the spindle uprights in the front suspension, a clear sign of a brake fluid leak, and saved myself some time and effort (and about half a bottle of brake fluid).

As you can see from the photo above, the front brake hoses pass behind the upright forward to the caliper. The drop plates that I installed over the winter, of course, added about an inch to the front track of the car by pushing out the spindle, the caliper bracket and the caliper itself a half-inch per side, and at the time I believed the brake hoses had plenty of clearance to make the straight shot into the caliper. As it turned out, however, the uprights ended up interfering very slightly with the brake hoses, causing it to leak. It didn't leak much, but enough to cause the issues I'd been having.

Read the Whole Article

Reply

Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Previous in Blog: A Vespa That Traffic Won’t Mess With   Next in Blog: What More Could They Ask the Corvair to Do?

Advertisement