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Copper-Doped Bismuth Selenide Could Be The Silcon Of Quantum Computers

Posted December 05, 2012 10:00 AM

From Science 2.0:

Physicists have found elusive Dirac electrons in a superconducting material called copper-doped bismuth selenide - and say it could serve as the silicon of the quantum era. Quantum computers use atoms to perform processing and memory tasks and for a generation have been promising dramatic increases in computing power because of their ability to carry out scores of calculations at once. Superconductors can, at cold enough temperatures, conduct electricity indefinitely from one kickstart of energy because they have no electrical resistance. Dirac electrons, named after the English physicist whose equation describes their behavior, are particles with such high energy that they straddle the realms of classical and quantum physics.

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Anonymous Poster #1
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Re: Copper-Doped Bismuth Selenide Could Be The Silcon Of Quantum Computers

12/06/2012 8:47 AM

Silcon Silicon

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