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What Happens to Plant Growth When You Remove Gravity?

Posted December 07, 2012 8:11 AM

From Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories:

It is well known that plant growth patterns are influenced by a variety of stimuli, gravity being one amongst many. On Earth plant roots exhibit characteristic behaviours called 'waving' and 'skewing', which were thought to be gravity-dependent events. However, Arabidopsis plants grown on the International Space Station (ISS) have proved this theory wrong, according to a study published in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Plant Biology: root 'waving' and 'skewing' occur in spaceflight plants independently of gravity.

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Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 78
Good Answers: 3
#1

Re: What Happens to Plant Growth When You Remove Gravity?

12/08/2012 3:27 PM

so the waving and skewing are indicative of roots growing towards all possible sources of nutrients...i suspect the nutrient distribution in the controls on earth was more apt to be effected by gravity then in space..ie under no gravity electrophoretic effects would be more noticeable over time than on earth and i suspect those clever root sensors become aware of that very quickly reducing the plants expenditure to grasp the appropriate metals etc in the soil mix and basically drawing them to the plants forward moving nutrient gradient...with an easier mechanism..(as far as the plant was concerned)

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