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Graphene Oxide Acts As Sponge for Radioactive Material

Posted January 13, 2013 4:30 PM

From DVICE:

Scientists have recently discovered adding graphene oxide to water contaminated by radioactive material will make environmental clean up easier. They discovered the compound quickly causes radionuclides to clump into particles that can more efficiently be removed from the water.

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Guru
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#1

Re: Graphene Oxide Acts As Sponge for Radioactive Material

01/14/2013 8:27 AM

OK. So what happens to the radionuclides after they have been removed from the water?

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#2
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Re: Graphene Oxide Acts As Sponge for Radioactive Material

03/24/2013 7:57 AM

Rice University chemist James Tour said in the press statement:

"Where you have huge pools of radioactive material, like at Fukushima, you add graphene oxide and get back a solid material from what were just ions in a solution. "Then you can skim it off and burn it. Graphene oxide burns very rapidly and leaves a cake of radioactive material you can then reuse."

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