CR4® - The Engineer's Place for News and Discussion®


Notes & Lines Blog

Notes & Lines

Notes & Lines discusses the intersection of math, science, and technology with performing and visual arts. Topics include bizarre instruments, technically-minded musicians, and cross-pollination of science and art.

Previous in Blog: Snow in June, Frost in July, Ice in August   Next in Blog: Musical AI Takes Off
Close
Close
Close

A Portable Pipe Organ: the International Touring Organ

Posted July 05, 2016 1:25 PM by BestInShow

Jonathan Fuller describes how the digital organ grew from the desire of a father to give his son a decent instrument to play at home. The desire of a 21st century organ virtuoso for a virtual pipe organ, a personal instrument that would travel with him, led to the development of the International Touring Organ, perhaps the most sophisticated application of digital organ technology – and organ-building ingenuity – to come to concert venues yet. The ITO story, like that of the Allen digital organ, combines the vision of a performer with pioneering technology to produce a stupendous, if sometimes controversial, musical instrument.

Traditional pipe organ. Image credit: Wikimedia Commons.

The artist

Cameron Carpenter, a prodigiously-talented, Julliard-educated organist, is out to change the conception that pipe organs are just for sacred music (with exceptions for baseball parks and movie theaters). His repertoire ranges from Bach to Bernstein to Leonard Cohen. Carpenter began campaigning for a portable pipe organ ten years or so ago. "Unlike a violinist who plays at 28 the instrument they played at eight, I have to go every night and play an instrument I don't know," he said. “What one doesn't see is the countless hours of rehearsals which are spent, not on the music, they're spent on (the organ).” Pipe organs aren’t portable. And they are intricately complex; no two are alike, and a performer typically needs hours to get acquainted with each instrument prior to a performance. Moreover, an instrument fixed in place limits concerts to locations with organs. Carpenter understood that applying the digital technology powering smaller organs to instruments with a grander scale would give him the portable instrument he craved.

The organ builders

Marshall and Ogletree Organ Builders (M and O) is the brainchild of two highly-respected concert organists, Douglas Marshall and David Ogletree. Founded in 2002, the company’s purpose is to build digital organs that meet – or surpass – the sound of the greatest pipe organs in the world. Since its inception the company has built a dozen organs. Each organ’s sounds are based on sound samples from pipe organs, using M and O’s patented process based on the one described in Fuller’s article. The company works in close cooperation with each instrument’s commissioners. Marshall and Ogletree undertook a daring proof of concept: the company built an electronic organ based solely on the sound of one pipe organ, an 1897 George Hutchings organ at Boston's Basilica of Our Lady of Perpetual Help. “Blind” comparisons of the sound of the original organ with the sound of the M and O organ demonstrated the fidelity of the new instrument to the original. Follow the link to do your own comparison.

The collaboration

In 2013, Carpenter commissioned M and O to build his touring organ, an instrument equal in sound to the finest pipe organs in the world that is transportable to concert venues. To create the sounds the artist wanted, M and O synthesized sounds from Carpenter’s favorite organs worldwide, including at least one Wurlitzer and organs he knew from his childhood.

The complexity of this commission goes beyond creating the organ sound; M and O developed the sound system and all of the internal components that make this organ work. Eighteen cases of components fill the truck that accompanies Carpenter to his concerts:

  • The six-manual console
  • Ten cases of speakers
  • Eight cases of subwoofers
  • A supercomputer/amplifier system

Supercomputers – three of them – with extremely fast processing speed manage the conversation between the organ’s manuals and the stored sounds. The flexible sound system can operate on two channels, for a set of headphones, up through 48 channels to fill a large concert venue.

The ingenuity involved in making this whole system portable is just about as impressive as engineering the digital organ sounds. The console breaks down into six pieces. The speakers, subwoofers, and console pieces fit into purpose-designed cases that protect them from the rigors of travel. According to M and O, “the entire organ, including console, racks and 48 channel audio system can be set up from dock to operational in about two hours, and broken down in about the same.” This video shows a greatly speeded-up version of organ set–up.

The result

Carpenter debuted his new International Touring Organ (ITO) March 9, 2014, in New York City’s Alice Tully Hall. The verdict of New York Times music critic Anthony Tommasini on the organ’s sound: “quite terrific.” Later in 2014, Mark Swed in the Los Angeles Times dubbed the ITO “… a genuine dream organ, a fantastically versatile electronic instrument with magnificent sounds…” A more recent Boston Classical review (July 11, 2015) characterizes the ITO as “an orchestra unto itself, capable of shimmering wah-wah effects.” Writing when the ITO made its debut, the artist himself pronounced that “… [The ITO] dares me to make good on my talent …”

Cameron Campbell and the ITO. Image credit: Marshall and Ogletree

Perhaps the most significant technical breakthrough for M and O organ technology is the firm’s ability to build instruments finely tuned to the commissioner’s liking, to fit both the venue(s) and the performer’s repertoire. The ITO’s portability, while authentic, is still limited to locations that its truck can access – and with enough power to pump into its circuits. I’m personally thankful that this somewhat lumpy portability brought Campbell and the ITO to Tanglewood, the Boston Symphony Orchestra’s summer home, last July. I can confirm that Campbell and the ITO do indeed sound quite terrific.

References

http://www.cameroncarpenter.com/

http://www.marshallandogletree.com/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cameron_Carpenter

http://www.theverge.com/2014/5/22/5741570/cameron-carpenter-international-touring-organ

http://www.metroweekly.com/2013/10/pipe-dreams/

Reply

Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Previous in Blog: Snow in June, Frost in July, Ice in August   Next in Blog: Musical AI Takes Off

Advertisement