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Full-duplex Wireless Eases Spectrum Crunch

Posted August 13, 2016 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

Despite advances and extensive use of the unused radio frequency spectrum, commercial wireless systems have yet to exploit the advantages of full-duplex communication techniques. Now researchers at Columbia University under the FlexICoN project, and in Europe under the DUPLO initiative, have demonstrated working full-duplex wireless systems using CMOS ICs. In this article, the authors describe the world's first full-duplex transceiver on a nanoscale CMOS chip with built-in noise suppressing filters.


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Guru

Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 5174
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#1

Re: Full-duplex Wireless Eases Spectrum Crunch

08/13/2016 11:16 AM

Technically, telephones are full duplex, but people are not. Two people don't generally both talk into the phone at the same time and expect to be understood.

Data exchange, on the other hand, could be full duplex, but it is tricky receiving a signal while transmitting with a much more powerful signal. The transmitted signal and echos of the transmitted signal have to be precisely canceled out to avoid overwhelming the received signal.

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Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Sebastopol, California
Posts: 802
Good Answers: 33
#2
In reply to #1

Re: Full-duplex Wireless Eases Spectrum Crunch

08/14/2016 11:55 AM

Very true. The noise floor must be very low to see the incoming signal unless the antenna is connected to an isolator. Even then, you have to be able to hear the incoming signal over the noise left over by the transmission, and that means having very fast active filters that already know whats coming!

The tech has existed for years in the radar biz but I guess it has to be re-invented for consumer use.

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