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The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

Posted January 09, 2017 12:11 PM by IronWoman

For many years, individuals and professionals alike have turned to seasonal affective disorder (SAD) as reason enough for mood changes with the fluctuating seasons. However, there has been controversy over whether SAD exists. Research has been conducted to prove the theory that people are simply over-exaggerating their symptoms; in addition, it is suggested that the studies supporting SAD resulted in inaccurate and problematic research.

As noted in a 2013 post from The Telegraph, researchers, led by Dr. David Kerr of Oregon State University, confirmed that SAD is far less common than people think. However, with its increased societal awareness — and simply the fact that people are unhappy about having to bundle up when the air gets chilly — the disorder in and of itself is being greatly overstated. David Kerr and his team reviewed past experiments and their inaccuracies in determining cases of SAD. In one study of around 800 people, ninety two percent of the group determined a lack of appetite and sleeplessness. Although the affected individuals reported seasonal changes in mood from depressive symptoms over a number of years, Kerr and his crew later discovered that these depressive symptoms occurred very little in the colder weather patterns. Kerr stresses the importance of not taking this disorder lightly; he is quick to state that there are varying degrees of SAD and patients can be clinically diagnosed with it. That being said, with increased reports and the significance of a majority of people reporting it, there is a high likelihood that the human psyche is putting undue stress on itself.

Earlier this year, Scientific American posted a similar article on the skewed studies behind SAD. Megan Traffanstedt and Dr. LoBello, in collaboration with Dr. Sheila Mehta, uncovered the questions asked in studies of SAD over the years and realized that those same questions are used to screen for major depression. The inevitably skewed data, in combination with confirmation biases of SAD in test subjects and its seeming popularity in society, create false expectations for patients when self-diagnosing. Additionally, a 1998 US survey of 8000 people suggested that seasonal depression is exceedingly rare and, therefore, hard to detect and pin-point at the population level. Moreover, genuine cases of SAD in the U.S. drastically decreased when comparing our colder months with the winters of countries across the globe. As an example, Traffanstedt, LoBello, and Mehta referenced winters in Norway. There, residents have severely shortened daylight and have yet to report higher rates of SAD over the years. Aside from the lack of evidence proving SAD’s prevalence, the researchers don’t deny that SAD exists. Traffanstedt, LoBello, and Mehta simply suggest that SAD may be a mood disorder, since the malady shares little symptoms with depression overall.

To counteract the negative attention that SAD has received, Time opened up about the severity of seasonal affective disorder and reasons for the change in mood. In it, Dr. Teodor Postolache and Dr. Alex Korb waste no time in acknowledging that SAD is real. They go on to say that people feel sad and helpless due to the absence of light (in other studies, rates of SAD vary by latitude), causing “dyssynchrony” in the body’s sleep-wake cycles and internal clocks. In turn, there are inevitable imbalances in serotonin, dopamine, and other neurotransmitter levels (i.e. appetite, energy, and trouble controlling mood). Not only this, but the modern, on-the-go lifestyles in which we inhabit further hinder people’s ability to cope with the seasonal changes. Korb and Postolache suggest that, like other creatures, we are meant to be much less active in winter in order to conserve energy for the coming months. That being said, Korb also suggests that lowered activity levels during winter months greatly affect our mood and stamina. The last — and possibly strongest — implication of SAD is the genetic and biological factors that follow the disease. Not only have researchers like Rosenthal found that seasonal affective disorder runs in families, but there is also a higher tendency for women to obtain it in their reproductive years.

If you began reading this believing—or now believe—that you may have SAD, there’s no need to worry. Korb and Rosenthal leave their readers with some tips to shake the blues away. Initially, try home remedies: light therapy helps more than people realize when it comes to depression of all forms (try sitting in front of a light or box fixture thirty minutes each morning). Overall, standing or sitting near windows with natural light greatly diffuses any stress that may be built up around you. Beyond the four walls, try exercising, socializing outdoors, or — if you can afford it — taking a vacation somewhere sunny. When worse comes to worst and your symptoms persist, do not hesitate to see a doctor, take a prescription, or attend cognitive behavioral therapy.

And now I turn to you, readers — do you believe SAD is real? Have you ever known anyone — or have you yourself — had to deal with seasonal affective disorder? Provide me with your insight and reasons in the comments below.

References

Scientific American: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/study-finds-seasonal-affective-disorder-doesn-t-exist/

The Telegraph: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/science/10272346/Seasonal-affective-disorder-is-over-exaggerated.html

Time: http://time.com/4243319/seasonal-affective-disorder-sad-light-therapy/

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#1

Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/09/2017 12:21 PM

It's hard to be sad on the beach....

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#2
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/09/2017 1:11 PM

Amen to that! I find that I become unseasonably grouchy most of the time after Christmas, maybe because it just feels colder, even when it really isn't.

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#3
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/09/2017 1:44 PM

Taking a trip with the family to the beach on the day after Christmas helps a lot. Of course living near the coast in Florida makes that possible.

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#4
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/09/2017 1:54 PM

Salutes! You have my undying envy of that.

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#18
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/09/2017 11:03 PM

I get the same way - and it's stinking hot here in Australia at Christmas.

Figure that!

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#19
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/09/2017 11:29 PM

Christmas comes once a month for you?

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#24
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/10/2017 10:56 AM

Nah, just once a year, ya blithering twit! No, I am not on such a monthly cycle. Although you can poke in jest, you could also draw back a nub! Oh wait, that wouldn't change much for ya, now would it?

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#5
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/09/2017 2:39 PM

I know, right?

A ten-minute walk from my fiancée's house.

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#6
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/09/2017 2:43 PM

Man you are killing me with that.

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#9
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/09/2017 2:57 PM

Well, to be honest, it looks more like this right now (6 am there)

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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/09/2017 3:12 PM

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#34
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/12/2017 8:36 AM

Beautiful. I am sure there are many fishes out there.

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#38
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/12/2017 10:47 AM

Yep, though most of them will try to eat you.

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#39
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/12/2017 12:21 PM

He should go take a dip and investigate that.

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#40
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/12/2017 12:40 PM

Other nice critters in Australian waters, too. Cone snails, for instance. Apparently innocuous little snails with pretty shells - a favourite of collectors - and a deadly venomous harpoon for which is no antivenom. Wonderful way to die. Then we have blue-ringed octopi, Pfeffer's Flambuoyant Cuttlefish, Irukandji (box) jellies (if the venom doesn't kill you, the agonising pain will), crocs, and of course, humans - the most dangerous of the lot.

Welcome to Australia - Where Everything Wants You To Die (not tomorrow)™

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#7

Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/09/2017 2:44 PM

Having spent a week in Minnesota in January once, I'd say you'd have to be downright crazy to live there through an entire winter.

Now, summertime? That's different.

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#8
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/09/2017 2:50 PM

On the plus side, it's so cold in Minneapolis in winter the flashers only describe themselves.

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#21
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/10/2017 6:06 AM

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#11
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/09/2017 4:03 PM

While I live in Ohio (most of the year), I spend my winters in South Florida at my beach apartment. Interestingly, I've met a considerable number of physicians in South Florida who were raised in Minnesota. Their comments to me have all been that Minnesota is a great place to visit, but they wouldn't want to live there. Too cold.

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#12
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/09/2017 4:26 PM

The temperature went from below zero to +25°F max. during the day. The wind blew and drifted snow and the piles of snow scooped off parking lots and piled up NEVER melted all winter.

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#13
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/09/2017 4:45 PM

"... snow scooped off parking lots and piled up NEVER melted all winter."

In Fargo the snow in the parking lots would generally (not always) melt off by Fourth of July... just in time for the early snows that came every August.

I can't remember if I've ever said it here, but Fargo is a great place to be from.

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#14

Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/09/2017 7:55 PM

I'm from New England. In the summer we complain that it is too hot and humid. In the winter, we complain that it is too cold and snowy (unless you are a skier, then you complain that it isn't cold or snowy enough) In the spring (mud season) we complain about the rain, and then the black flies that hatch just when it becomes warm enough to go out doors.

Finally, in late September or early October, comes that one perfect day of the year. Then we complain because we have nothing to complain about

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#15
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/09/2017 8:10 PM

You're from Haav'rill, ay? You should know this one, the Plum Island National Anthem:

Come all ye New'b'ryporters,

and listen to my song.

If you’ve a short attention span

I shall not make it long.

.

I am a Plum Islander; Plum Island is my home

When greenhead flies

fill the skies,

no man walks alone.

.

CHORUS:

To me way, hey, Plum Island,

the only home for me

Sinking as the sun sets

into Atlantic Sea.

.

We cannot drink the water here;

we truck it in from town.

We cannot flush our toilets

when the water table’s down.

.

We cannot drink the water,

so all we drink is beer.

And when the tides are running high

the roads all disappear!

.

CHORUS:

To me way, hey, Plum Island,

the only home for me

Sinking as the sun sets

into Atlantic Sea.

.

In my front yard there’s naught but sand

where once I had a lawn,

And my whole house sits on the beach

now that the dunes are gone.

.

And on that beach in summertime,

a horde of tourists lie,

And when you hear the screams you know

it’s lunchtime for the flies.

.

CHORUS:

To me way, hey, Plum Island,

the only home for me

Sinking as the sun sets

into Atlantic Sea.

.

Someday Plum Island we shall make

an independent nation.

Protected by our green head flies,

flying in formation.

.

And when the storms are raging,

and snow is coming down,

thank God we’ve got a bar out here

since we can’t get to town.

.

CHORUS:

To me way, hey, Plum Island,

the only home for me

Sinking as the sun sets

into Atlantic Sea.

.

FINALE:

To me way, hey, Plum Island,

the only home for me

Sinking as the sun sets

into At-lan-tic Sea.

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#25
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/10/2017 11:44 AM

Sorry, folks. I meant to mark that Off-Topic.

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#35
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/12/2017 8:41 AM

I didn't know you can sing too. You should teach Lyn and James sometimes.

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#23
In reply to #14

Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/10/2017 6:11 AM

There's something terribly English about that. The original settlers' traditions have prevailed...

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#26
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/10/2017 12:03 PM

The song has a 'sea shanty' sound to it. Nice little tune; somewhere (on cassette tape) I have a recording of it. Looked for it on YouTube. No luck.

I lived on Plum Island for a number of years. I was there during The Perfect Storm and watched as the waves demolished one particular house featuring a sign that read "Philips Real Estate Insurance."

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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/12/2017 9:00 AM

Kulas thought you are from mejico, Greg.

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#37
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/12/2017 10:24 AM

So then, you do know Kulas. I think you must be brothers from the same mother, but born out of wedlock.

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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/09/2017 8:47 PM

The problem with studying the effect on the brain of some external influence is that the brain also affects itself. Any medicine seems to work if the patient believes in it, the Placebo effect. Likewise, if someone believes he is affected by SAD, then he will be. It's very difficult to perform an objective study.

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#17
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/09/2017 9:24 PM

I knew I had 'something' years before I'd heard of the term and I learnt quite by accident that extended exposure to bright light mitigates it somewhat, so I know it isn't a 'placebo effect.' It is quite real, unfortunately. Lived in Massachusetts for ten years and absolutely dreaded the short days in winter. The cold and snow I don't mind. It was the long dark nights. It has not been a problem since moving to Texas.

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#20
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/10/2017 6:00 AM

Fortunately for me I am not the high strung type so adapt to winter pretty easy.

I get out of bed at sunrise (~noon) then go to bed at sunset (~4 PM) and feel happy productive and rested the whole day. Sometimes I even sneak a 2 - 3 hour mid day nap in if it's cloudy and cold too!

Interestingly enough I get as much or more done in 4 hours being rested and awake than the overdriven types do because they are all burned out and tired from not sleeping and dealing with the dark.

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#22

Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/10/2017 6:09 AM

<...there has been controversy over whether SAD exists...> Given the suicide rate in Iceland (the capital city of Reykjavik receives only 3.6h of sunlight on the Winter Solstice, if it isn't overcast) it is difficult to believe otherwise.

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#27

Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/11/2017 11:24 AM

I always thought SAD was real and was sure that I have it, or used to have it. For the past few years I've been sitting under a full-spectrum work light at night while watching TV -- I'm usually crocheting or doing some other handwork -- and I don't feel as blue. I attributed the improvement to the lamp, but this isn't exactly a controlled experiment.

Maybe the culprit is Vitamin D deficiency, a well-documented problem for those who live in the more northern parts of the northern hemisphere. Low vitamin D levels can contribute to depression. Levels will be even lower during short winter days. If there's a scientific basis for SAD perhaps the real culprit is vitamin D.

Very good post!

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#28
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/11/2017 11:52 AM

Thank you! While in the process of writing, I had spoken with many a person about Vitamin D deficiency (I know several individuals who take Vitamin D tablets on the reg, especially in the Northeast). As a rule, we do not go into "hibernation mode" like other species. Yet, our bodies and minds are designed to naturally adapt to the colder weather and shorter days by doing so. To make the process more practical, we cope by oversleeping, overeating, and perhaps being a little moodier haha.

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#30
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/11/2017 1:31 PM

Similar thing here. I take vitamin D supplements in the winter as well and they seem to help despite my naturally high level of skepticism to such things but to be fair I have found other nutritional supplements to have noticeable effects as well and some that did nothing.

I've lived a fairly physically active/abusive work life and thusly am at the age were joint stiffness and discomfort is a normal part of life. Fish oil tablets have shown a noticeable improvement in that area. Same with vitamin B as well.

The last experiment was with whole undistilled apple cider vinegar. I bought a 20 oz bottle about two months ago and take a good sized swallow of it every 2 - 3 days.

I've lost about 8 pounds so far despite going into a less active and weight gaining part of the year and have more energy now. i had doubts being the first three weeks did nothing as i was expecting it to. Guess I have to admit that maybe it does work too and will have to buy another one soon.

My Ex was into all that holistic crap and I do have to say that most of it doesn't work though. The vitamin And mineral supplements aspect of it seems to have merit for certain things but that's about it.

The will, horoscopes, astrological charts, healing stones and crystals (good god WTF?) however will not fix Diabetes, Hypertension and thyroid problems no matter how hard a person believes they will. It also won't give you a high IQ, intelligence and a more likable personality no matter how much smarter than everyone else it may make you feel about yourself either. (that's a large part of what drove us apart.)

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#31
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/11/2017 2:34 PM

There is something to the whole undistilled apple cider vinegar trick. One of our cats keeps getting some sort of irritation to his eyelid, and that eye will swell shut (protective eyelid comes out and looks horrible). Overnight with the apple cider vinegar being applied to his fur (paw or somewhere he can lick which is technically anywhere), and the cat will be back or virtually back to normal.

We think this magic elixir of the gods has probiotic ingredients within, and the low pH does not hurt anything either.

So called excess stomach acid is usually too little acid, poor emulsion in the stomach contents (in humans) resulting in heartburn symptoms. More water to help emulsify a fatty meal, or cider is actually better. I found that hard ciders only give me heartburn, so that is not the cure or it has been filtered out.

Acidic foods such as tart berries, yogurt, and anything with apple cider vinegar can alleviate indigestion, as long as there is not already a peptic ulcer. Seek professional medical attention for symptoms of peptic ulcer. (END of disclaimer).

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#32
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/11/2017 3:06 PM

I was pretty skeptical of it and what people claimed but I figured I like to argue so I would do a baseline experiment on myself to see if it was real or not. (I've wasted $3 on drinking worse things to be prove myself wrong before.)

Turns out I have to give it some plausible merit.

I have since read up on it and there seems to be a bunch of theories on why it works for most people. Most have fair scientific and biochemistry backing, and some are just anecdotal old fools beliefs, but still I see it's worth continuing the experiment for a while.

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#29
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/11/2017 12:02 PM

There are Vitamin D supplements, as well as fortified milk that can help. Milk makes me sleepy though. I like to sleep in winter anyway. It is the bear within me that makes hibernation an attractive alternative to being out in the cold.

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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

02/07/2017 3:07 PM

Also, Vitamin D is used for nerve issues...for me, the lower bottom of my feet nearer and including the toes. (Medial Plantar and Lateral Plantar areas) where it was somewhat numb.

It wasn't Diabetes, but I had injured my ankles so many times (dislocation, torn ligaments, hairline fractures), I thought this could be it.

The Doctor said it may be nerve damage (possibly from the injuries) of which doctor prescribed 2,000 mg of Vitamin D daily.

Link

"The presence of vitamin D, its activating enzyme, and VDR in the brain leads researchers to question what role vitamin D plays in the brain. ... In recent studies, vitamin D has exhibited an association with the regulation of nerve growth factor (NGF) synthesis. NGF is responsible for the growth and survival of neurons."

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#33

Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/12/2017 1:38 AM

Christmas can be a wonderful time for some . Loved ones , friends , putting up the Christmas tree , setting up the trains , watching the snow come down , decorating , cooking and wrapping gifts etc.

But now imagine you're alone , and all of the above are just memories .

And there is everything in between those two scenarios .

It's your environment . And sure if your alone and it's cold and gloomy out you will be more prone to introspection and memories , perhaps depression . It just depends on what's around you , who is around you .

Then again you may be a loner and love cold dark nights !

Did I make my point ?

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#41

Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/12/2017 1:23 PM

My wife certainly seems to have it in the snowy months, which number 5 around here.

I don't give SAD a chance to set in. I have a Fat bike with studded tires. Five rides a week keeps the doldrums away, especially this winter, where we keep swinging from 50 degrees and heavy rain one day to 10 degrees and tons of lake effects 3 days later. The same route is different every blinkin day. Mud to ice to a foot of snow - keeps you dancing on the pedals.

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#42
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/12/2017 1:26 PM

When I was living in Taxachusetts I rode my mountain bike 20 miles every morning. It didn't help. I think it depends on the individual.

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#43
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/12/2017 1:51 PM

Well then you weren't riding it correctly. You gotta ride it like you stole it, ice be danged. I subscribe to the adage that if you don't crash on a mountain bike ride, you weren't riding hard enough.

Wait a minute - 20 miles a day. You weren't on a tough enough ride then, because most 20 mile rides around here, in this weather, would take 5 hours. I do good to average anything over 4 miles per hour right now, where I average 15 in the summer. The harder the ride, the better the feeling afterwards.

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#44
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/12/2017 2:00 PM

No doubt I was. I quite neglected how the macho element might figure into such things. My bad.

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#45
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/12/2017 2:19 PM

Yes - that is the key to the ride being enjoyable, not just exercise.

For example, the other night it was raining and so foggy, there was no way I'd chance a ride down the street for a half mile with automobiles present to get to an old lease road for a ride, even with a bank of lights. (2350 lumens of light forward / 100 lumens rear ward) So, since riding a trainer in the house is out - what to do? Loops around the house for half an hour, and try to get that average speed up each loop. (I use a phone app that records your speed) That made an other wise boring ride for exercise a treat - especially when I missed a corner due to ice and nailed the bush out in front of the house - great fun. Try riding like that and SAD stays away.

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#52
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/13/2017 9:07 AM

Sounds like what you need is some prickly pear cactus groves to ride through.

That way, you better make those curves.

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#53
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/13/2017 9:15 AM

Don't think the prickly pears would like this trail around my house - my outdoor trainer. Just place the bike on it and pedal.

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#46
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/12/2017 4:37 PM

I used to work with a guy who did a 5 mile run every day before he came to work. Said it gave him superior stamina and drive.

The guy was useless start to finish day in and day out and that's going by my standards and I know I am lazy as crap.

I always speculated that if he didn't burn up a day's worth of work energy before he came to work that just maybe he would have the energy to accomplish at least as much as a 13 year old with ADD could in a day.

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#47
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/12/2017 4:45 PM

But, the question in this thread is - did he suffer from SAD? (or was he just a sad excuse for an employee?)

I ALWAYS ride when it won't affect my work - short rides on evenings during the work week - marathon like attempts on the weekends, and mid -day so I know I'll bounce back by Monday morning. I refuse to be someone who puts exercise ahead of work, even though the exercise was started for my heart per doctors recommendations.

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#48
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/12/2017 6:17 PM

My view was he was not all that great of employee.

Not terrible but given the physical exertion required to run a 5 miles every morning I would have thought he should have been far more physically productive than he was but then I accounted for the lack of productivity to be he ran himself out of gas before the race started every day.

Heck most days by 2 - 3 PM he was typically more burned out and looking for a place to hide and do nothing than most of us.

I think if he had cut back to 1 - 2 miles a day he would have been better off.

Hard to say really. Some people have a very hard time prioritizing what's really important over what they think is important which to me running anywhere any time other than to save my life as a last resort is wasting too much of my energy so anyone who runs anywhere for fun is sort of odd and has poor priorities to me.

This cartoon pretty much sums it up.

Ghostkiss comic episode-4-extra

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#51
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/13/2017 8:30 AM

There is also the possibility that he put so much emphasis on the running, that he didn't want to waste energy at work. I found myself slipping into that trap about 10 years ago. I was trying to ride with people 25 years younger, who had never quit cycling, while I had just started 4 years prior, and felt the need to get to their fitness level very quickly. I rode myself into exhaustion.

Then I woke up and got my priorities straight. First thing I did was get rid of the bike computer and start to just ride, not try to go faster or farther than the last ride. I quit the group rides with the kids and just rode by myself at a pace fit for my level of fitness. Slow rides became a possibility again, if I was tired. I even bought a cruiser bike so I could just tool around town on some days. When forced from engineering into production at work, I no longer would try to take it easy to save energy for cycling - I just went slower and not as far on the bike rides.

Much better results followed and I can ride with the kids at their pace now. The only catch is this need to ride in winter, which is where my tie in to SAD comes from. By the mid 60's, if you quit in winter, in spring, riding feels like it did 14 years ago - takes months to get back to where I was in autumn. The kids can still take winter off - I tried once and know I can't.

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#57
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/13/2017 3:23 PM

That's rather how I was with sports in high school. All that warm up crap did far more harm than good for me.

Someo the best basketball games I ever played were because I showed up late to the game and played dead cold. All that warm up crap just sucked too much of my needed game energy out of me so by the end of the first half I was shot and then some.

It seemed to be a common issue with us larger frame more muscular built farm boys on the team. We grew up hitting physical work hard from a dead standstill every day and just didn't have the need for wasting energy on pre work warm up nonsense.

That and I equated us to being farm tractors not race cars. We don't move with speed. We move with power and can sustain it for far longer than any of the speedy skinny kids could. They'd spend months in the weight room trying to get to where they could bench press their own weight and the guys like me could do it dead cold any time and multiple times over without ever having done 'real weights' to begin with.

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#58
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/13/2017 3:41 PM

Hey - bet you played basketball like my high school did - all but 2 guys out of 15 were football players, and the basketball coach was the football coach as well. We just extended football season for 3 more months. We even called the sport "round ball" to differentiate from football. Not much height on the team, but the tall skinny dudes from other schools could not get near the basket. My junior year, the two starting forwards were our full back and our largest halfback/linebacker. Both went to college on football scholarships. We lost a lot of size when they graduated, and I'm not talking height. We had a tackle try to play forward my senior year, but he had screwed up a knee in football season and couldn't make it all season.

I had size as well, and liked the boxing out under the rim, but was not very good at shooting, so I kept the bench warm. Practices were fun. Full body fouls were encouraged.

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#59
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/13/2017 5:16 PM

Nope.

Our coaches thought it was track but with a orange ball in the way of all the running.

We could run like deer all day but damn, give us that round orange thing and we had no clue what to do with it and for not knowing we were made to run even more as punishment.

My niece feels the same way now about basketball and related practice. We're not there to learn to run. We are there to learn how to competitively handle that orange ball. If we weren't it would just be track practice.

Years ago when I was in high school during one track practice several of us got out basketballs and started playing a game right inthe middle of it. The coach blew a gasket and asked us what we were doing. We pointed out that back in basketball practice all he did was make us run so we figured that for track practice playing basketball would be more fitting.

It wasn't like the coach could make us run any more than we did in basketball practice.

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#54
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/13/2017 9:21 AM

Must have been an action flick, if it had been a romance, so would have eyes glued to screen. LOL

I used to do some jogging with a professor friend from church when I was in graduate school, but we never went more than 4 miles (on an indoor track with lots of female joggers around to watch as we followed). Never went faster than about 7 minutes per mile, so it was not a sprint.

It never seemed to stop me from having whatever energy I needed in the laboratory, but then again, that can pretty sedentary most of the time. Just a lot of painstaking set-up, calibration, alignment, preparing low pressure vessels, tuning lasers, blah, blah, not much heavy lifting there. I was all of 25 years old then.

Other times in my career, the few times I worked out were not what I would call a regular routine, and it was after work. Also, when I have had employment with a lot of lifting, moving materials, stacking, or just a lot of walking in a large plant environment, I was well spent by the end of a 12 hour day, summer or winter. I have worked in 114 degree heat bagging drilling mud additive, and in the dead cold of a blue norther sent directly from your home town. I have to admit I prefer the cold days, simply because (1) not likely to suffer from heat exhaustion, and (2) once you get going on a material handling task (like operating a bagging machine), you warm right up and do not notice the cold any more.

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#56
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/13/2017 3:13 PM

That's kind of how I am. I have no problem with doing moderate and higher level physical exertion for extended periods if I can keep comfortable.

I can tolerate heat well enough but I don't do hard labor in it at all and consider that type of work best suited to the overly ambitious fools and younger people.

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#49

Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/12/2017 6:29 PM

It is real and also called "cabin fever" as in old prospector tales and trappers.

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#50

Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/13/2017 1:41 AM

I wasn't made for winter, sorry!

Sun shines from here almost 365 days a year

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#55
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/13/2017 9:23 AM

Isn't it sort of hot living where the sun shines "from"? I bet you don't sit down for long.

That is a nice picture, where is that?

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#60

Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/19/2017 10:45 AM

From living with someone who has SAD, I think the sun lamps are one of the most effective tools for dealing with this disorder. Although the bright light is very annoying for people who don't have it, maybe it had a positive effect on me as well?

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#61
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/19/2017 2:40 PM

Only if your cheerful radiance is causing the grumpiness to decline in the general radius around you, to the much chagrined displeasure of the unenlightened.

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#62
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/19/2017 2:52 PM

i have no such thing

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#63
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Re: The Science Behind SAD: Is It Real?

01/19/2017 3:16 PM

Hilarious! OK, be grumpy if you want to.

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