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Hemmings Motor News Blog Blog

Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

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2017 Ridler Award Goes to 1933 Ford “Renaissance Roadster”

Posted March 09, 2017 9:00 AM by dstrohl

It may resemble a customized 1933 Ford, but the Renaissance Roadster that captured the 2017 Ridler Award at the Detroit Autorama didn’t begin its life on a Dearborn assembly line. Instead, its chassis was built from scratch and its body panels formed by hand from flat steel and aluminum stock. Builder Steve Frisbie of Steve’s Auto Restorations in Portland, Oregon, estimates that 20,000 man-hours and 42 months went into building the custom, owned by Buddy Jordan of Portland, Oregon, with the work completed just one week before the Detroit show.

The Renaissance Roadster began as a design sketched by Chris Ito, with input from Frisbie. The chassis was constructed from 3/16″ steel and 1.5-inch chrome-moly steel, while the body was crafted from sheets of 3003 aluminum, hand-formed panel-by-panel. The independent front and rear suspensions were also designed and fabricated by Steve’s, and use race car style remote shock absorbers.

A gorgeous imposter, but an imposter nonetheless.

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