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Charging Electronic Devices Using Wireless Power Transfer

Posted March 11, 2017 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

Would you like to be able to wirelessly charge your laptop or smartphone just by walking into a room? Scientists at Disney Research have successfully demonstrated a method they call quasistatic cavity resonance (QSCR) that enables electronic devices to be charged without cords, cradles, or other external devices.


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Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member United Kingdom - Member - New Member

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#1

Re: Charging Electronic Devices Using Wireless Power Transfer

03/11/2017 3:39 AM

Would you like to cook your intestines by simply walking into a room.
More and more solving nonexistent problems with more and more unecessary complication.
My mobile phone only needs charging once a week.... 'cos it doesn't incorporate a load of extraneous crap.
Del

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Guru

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#2
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Re: Charging Electronic Devices Using Wireless Power Transfer

03/11/2017 7:28 AM

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Guru

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#3

Re: Charging Electronic Devices Using Wireless Power Transfer

03/11/2017 10:16 AM

It's probably not a good idea for people with pacemakers.

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Guru

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#4

Re: Charging Electronic Devices Using Wireless Power Transfer

03/12/2017 6:43 PM

1) HISTORY - Tesla thought up that idea eons ago, but industry didn't take very kindly to his idea.

2) PHYSICS - The "Inverse-Square-Law" of power diminishment will likely doom it.

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Guru

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#5

Re: Charging Electronic Devices Using Wireless Power Transfer

03/13/2017 11:05 AM

Considering all the hoopla over locating homes and schools near high voltage power lines due to increased cancer risk, I'm surprised that someone will voluntarily subject themselves to a relatively dense alternating magnetic field.

Be interesting to see a health risks assessment.

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Guru

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#6
In reply to #5

Re: Charging Electronic Devices Using Wireless Power Transfer

03/14/2017 11:51 AM

For most people, health concerns are way below their concerns over personal convenience.

How many people do you know who would walk around with chunks of live radioactive material hanging from their neck if they found out it would charge their cell phone wirelessly?

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Guru

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#7
In reply to #6

Re: Charging Electronic Devices Using Wireless Power Transfer

03/14/2017 12:24 PM

I'm reminded of a project from the '70s. It was a strontinum 90 thermal pacemaker battery that would have a 100+ year life. At the time, if you had a pacemaker, you had to go in every couple of years to get cut open to change the batteries.

It didn't go into production because it couldn't pass the 30-06 test. Specifically, the failure mode was that someone with one of these pacemakers would go hunting and get shot with a 30-06 in the pacemaker. The strontinum 90 release was considered unacceptable. Otherwise, radiation at the exterior of the battery case was at safe levels.

You are probably right that most people would take the risk for convenience, but I suspect that with the number of nuttophobics, glutenophobics, lactoseinterantophobics, cellphonesignalophobics, vaccinationophobics and just general anythingiexperienceinlifeophobics, that some political leach will latch onto it for press coverage and make it unavailable unless it is taxed highly enough.

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