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Could This Dodge WC57 Command Car Have Been Patton’s Own?

Posted May 11, 2017 9:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: classic auto jeep military WWII

General George S. Patton had an affinity for Dodge Command Cars, and by the time he took command of the Third Army in France in 1944, he had a few ideas about how to make a good vehicle even better. Prior to departing England, Patton requested that a Dodge WC57 Command Car be modified to add protective armor, storage space, and in an effort to counter attacks from the air, a .50-caliber machine gun. On Friday, May 12, a Dodge WC57 equipped with these touches, but lacking specific documentation linking it to Patton, is slated to cross the block at Auctions America’s Auburn sale.

In 1942, Dodge introduced a line of purpose-built military vehicles built upon the 3/4-ton chassis, including the WC56 and the WC57 (essentially a WC56 with a front winch and a slightly longer chassis to accommodate this). In the eyes of some, these third-series Dodge WC’s (for Weapons Carriers) were among the finest trucks built by the Allies during the war.

This 'warhorse' of an American WWII legend could fetch a pretty penny, even without authentication.

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#1

Re: Could This Dodge WC57 Command Car Have Been Patton’s Own?

05/11/2017 7:37 PM

This looks a little too clean, almost like a restorer has modified a vehicle to try and cash in on the Patton name.

If this is the real deal then where has it been safely stored after the war? Were these things sold off to private parties or perhaps given away as gifts to Generals.

Colour me sceptical.

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Re: Could This Dodge WC57 Command Car Have Been Patton’s Own?

05/12/2017 11:06 AM

I do believe what we are seeing is known as coincidence writing style, usually meant to "pardon the expression", trump up the value of something.

If it were Patton's own Command Car, yes, it would be worth a helluva lot of money, but with no documents, no pedigree, it is game over.

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Re: Could This Dodge WC57 Command Car Have Been Patton’s Own?

05/18/2017 12:42 PM

It's certainly not the original (70-year old ?) tires...

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Re: Could This Dodge WC57 Command Car Have Been Patton’s Own?

05/18/2017 1:24 PM

If the tires were stored in treated paper, hermetically sealed in crate (that means air-tight), with no ozone ingress (a little oxygen is not that much of a problem), and perhaps nitrogen gas overpressure maintained for 70 years, then maybe that could be possible. Out in the elements, I suspect not.

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