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Logarithmic Amplifier Chip Design and Application Considerations

Posted May 03, 2017 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

Able to compress a signal of wide dynamic range to its decibel equivalent, logarithmic amplifier chips produce an output voltage that is directly proportional to the logarithm of an input voltage or current. These chips are often useful in applications involving signal compression.


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Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 10397
Good Answers: 126
#1

Re: Logarithmic Amplifier Chip Design and Application Considerations

06/14/2017 1:38 PM

Does anyone know of a chip with dual log amps on it? I want to take two microphone signals (attached to a vessel with stuff taking place in it, such as normal boiling, and maybe "bump" boiling, rectify the AC signals, smooth with about a 1 second to 2 second time constant, then use this as input to log amplifiers (to arrive at a decibel signal to be output in the range of 0-5 V. I know TI has some log amps with internal 2.5 V reference, but did not find a package with dual on one chip (not that it is all that much harder to just use two chips).

The package type shown in the OP is surface mount, is that correct? I am still learning how to do that with small chips.

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