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Real-time Imaging of Methane Gas Leaks

Posted May 07, 2017 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

Active hyperspectral imaging technology combines with a single-pixel camera to yield portable, low-cost, sensitive methane detection technology. The imaging system captures videos of methane gas leaking from a tube at about 0.2 l/min.


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Guru
Hobbies - DIY Welding - Wannabeabettawelda

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Annapolis, Maryland
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#1

Re: Real-time Imaging of Methane Gas Leaks

05/12/2017 6:30 PM

I'm in trouble now.

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Guru

Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 5265
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#2

Re: Real-time Imaging of Methane Gas Leaks

05/13/2017 12:09 PM

"Storage considerations

The maximum shelf life of nitroglycerin-based dynamite is recommended as one year from the date of manufacture under good storage conditions.[5]

Over time, regardless of the sorbent used, sticks of dynamite will "weep" or "sweat" nitroglycerin, which can then pool in the bottom of the box or storage area. For that reason, explosive manuals recommend the repeated turning over of boxes of dynamite in storage. Crystals will form on the outside of the sticks causing them to be even more shock, friction, and temperature sensitive. This creates a very dangerous situation. While the risk of an explosion without the use of a blasting cap is minimal for fresh dynamite, old dynamite is dangerous. Modern packaging helps eliminate this by placing the dynamite into sealed plastic bags, and using wax coated cardboard.

Dynamite is moderately sensitive to shock. Shock resistance tests are usually carried out with a drop-hammer: about 100 mg of explosive is placed on an anvil, upon which a weight of between 0.5 and 10 kg is dropped from different heights until detonation is achieved.[7] With a hammer of 2 kg, mercury fulminate detonates with a drop distance of 1 to 2 cm, nitroglycerin with 4 to 5 cm, dynamite with 15 to 30 cm, and ammoniacal explosives with 40 to 50 cm."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamite

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Guru

Join Date: Dec 2016
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#3
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Re: Real-time Imaging of Methane Gas Leaks

05/14/2017 8:27 AM
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