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Tips for Preventing Preventable Hearing Loss

Posted May 20, 2017 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

Hearing loss caused by prolonged exposure to music or a noisy work environment can be gradual with the first signs being missed background noises (a squeaking door, the ticking of a clock) to affected conversations.


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Guru

Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: South of Minot North Dakota
Posts: 8399
Good Answers: 771
#1

Re: Tips for Preventing Preventable Hearing Loss

05/20/2017 6:19 PM

I can hear the cat purring from across the room so I guess that means I am still good.

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Guru

Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 5759
Good Answers: 577
#2
In reply to #1

Re: Tips for Preventing Preventable Hearing Loss

05/20/2017 7:35 PM

I think I'm pretty good too at the low-frequency end, but I suspect I am missing some of the higher frequencies needed for conversation in a noisy room.

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Guru

Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: South of Minot North Dakota
Posts: 8399
Good Answers: 771
#3
In reply to #2

Re: Tips for Preventing Preventable Hearing Loss

05/20/2017 10:56 PM

Last DIY hearing frequency range test I gave myself with my signal generator and a good speaker showed I was still good for ~ 20 - 17.2 KHz.

Not bad for someone who openly admits that given what I have done to my hearing in life I should be half deaf by now.

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