CR4® - The Engineer's Place for News and Discussion®


Chemical Manufacturing Blog

Chemical Manufacturing

The Chemical Manufacturing Blog is the place for conversation and discussion about process equipment and control, biotech & environmental, specialty chemicals and nano-engineering. Here, you'll find everything from application ideas, to news and industry trends, to hot topics and cutting edge innovations.

Previous in Blog: Living Chemical Detectors: Gloves Glow and Sensors Shine   Next in Blog: Colored Lights Turn on Bacteria
Close
Close
Close
4 comments

Low GWP Refrigerants — Understanding GWP, GHG, ODP, and Climate Change

Posted May 28, 2017 12:00 AM by Engineering360 eNewsletter

Low global warming potential (GWP) refrigerants emerging today can be grouped into several categories, making selection complicated. While low GWP is important, it is only one of many factors involved in refrigerant selection and safe use.


Editor's Note: This news brief was brought to you by the Chemical Manufacturing eNewsletter. Subscribe today to have content like this delivered to your inbox

Reply

Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Out of your mind! Not in sight!
Posts: 3977
Good Answers: 92
#1

Re: Low GWP Refrigerants — Understanding GWP, GHG, ODP, and Climate Change

05/30/2017 8:41 AM

That's almost funny if it wasn't reality.

I wonder what this scale is worth once they realise that there is no warming potential in CO2.

R744 is without further doubt CO2 itself. Its numer one on GWP compared to all the other refrigerant fluids? Not really. How disappointing!

Why are these fluids actually called refrigerants if they by new definition have this immense warming potential???

__________________
Common Sense Dictates
Reply
Guru

Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: South of Minot North Dakota
Posts: 8399
Good Answers: 771
#2
In reply to #1

Re: Low GWP Refrigerants — Understanding GWP, GHG, ODP, and Climate Change

05/30/2017 12:16 PM

The keyword is 'potential' being general lack of verifiable proof of any of it potential to do as implied having shown up anywhere.

Personally I am rather fond of R-290 (propane) myself!

Highly compatible with the vast majority of existing systems with minimal work and cost (unless your HVAC tech is a crook) and very efficient plus dirt cheap to manufacture as well.

Also has made it on the EPA listing of approved refrigerants for nearly every major industrial, commercial and domestic application that was once the primary domain of R-22, R-134A and similar refrigerants as of a few years ago. (About time we caught up with what the rest of the developed and not developed world knew 50 years ago.)

Reply
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Out of your mind! Not in sight!
Posts: 3977
Good Answers: 92
#3
In reply to #2

Re: Low GWP Refrigerants — Understanding GWP, GHG, ODP, and Climate Change

06/01/2017 3:47 AM

Ha, but by using these fluids in refrigeration system we already verified the cooling potential. I like my camping fridge that runs on gas, but its rather burning it ....

__________________
Common Sense Dictates
Reply
Guru

Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: South of Minot North Dakota
Posts: 8399
Good Answers: 771
#4
In reply to #3

Re: Low GWP Refrigerants — Understanding GWP, GHG, ODP, and Climate Change

06/03/2017 12:38 PM

I'm just a fan of propane in general.

Probably started back in high school when those of us who got our first vehicles were faced with the reality that most vehicles kids get given to them when they are 16 - 17 don't have working air conditioning and back then (early 1990's) R- 12 was spendy by a kids standards.

That's where propane came to the rescue! 'Mexican freon' that is and it worked good for free being someone always a 20# BBQ grill cylinder or 1# bottles they could get a hold of!

Reply
Reply to Blog Entry 4 comments
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Previous in Blog: Living Chemical Detectors: Gloves Glow and Sensors Shine   Next in Blog: Colored Lights Turn on Bacteria

Advertisement