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Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

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Ford’s Other Right-Hand Man: P.E. Martin and the Development of the Assembly Line

Posted August 03, 2017 9:00 AM by dstrohl

For the first few years, Ford manufactured average-priced cars and a few expensive cars: Models A, B, C, F, K, N, R, and S. In addition, there were experimental models that were not produced. The stockholders wanted to provide high-end cars with high-end margins. The beautiful Model K was the first Ford with a six-cylinder engine and the last one until the 1940s. The largest investor, Malcolmson, departed after the Model K flop. Ford and the finance officer James Couzens believed the key to survival was manufacturing an economic car. People didn’t expect Ford to produce luxurious cars like the Model K, and were disinclined to buy a luxury car from Ford.

In April 1904, Ford bought land on Piquette Avenue in Detroit, built his first plant, and, by 1906, Peter Ed (P.E.) Martin was put in charge of the Assembly Department for what was to be the Model T car, working under manager Thomas Walburn. Design on the Model T proceeded through 1907, with P.E. working alongside Ford constructing the process for manufacturing the Model T. Henry Ford developed such confidence in P.E. that, in April 1908, six weeks after announcing to the world that the Model T had arrived, P.E. was made plant manager. During this time, P.E. and a team of engineers worked on the flow of manufacturing and methods of simplifying the process and increasing productivity. The result of their efforts was the birth of the Assembly Line concept, breaking down manufacturing into simple solitary components/processes that could be done by unskilled labor as the product proceeded along a moving assembly line. This one accomplishment revolutionized manufacturing and the way all products, from cars to appliances to computers, were made ever after.

De-cloaking Henry Ford's most overlooked innovator.

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Re: Ford’s Other Right-Hand Man: P.E. Martin and the Development of the Assembly Line

08/04/2017 1:38 PM

..."MORE THAN HALF THE WORLD'S CARS WERE NEARLY IDENTICAL MODEL T'S DURING THE MID 1920'S.

THE CAR WAS INTRODUCED WITH A PRICE TAG OF $850. THE MODEL T LATER SOLD FOR AS LITTLE AS $260, BECAUSE FORD PASSED ALONG THE SAVINGS FROM HIS PRODUCTION INNOVATIONS.

The car that established a mass market for automobiles, the Model T, was introduced on Oct. 1, 1908. The first Model T had a 20-horsepower, four-cylinder engine, reached a top speed of about 45 miles per hour, got about 13 to 21 miles per gallon of gasoline and weighed 1,200 pounds. It was the ninth of Henry Ford's production cars."....

https://media.ford.com/content/fordmedia/fna/us/en/news/2013/08/05/model-t-facts.html

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