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Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

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Engineers Test the New 1955 Chevrolet Against the Competition

Posted October 31, 2017 9:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: chevrolet engineering video

Would you like to see a 1955 Chevy put through its paces on the test track at the GM Proving Ground? How about one pulling 16 other full-size cars to prove that its engine has lots of torque? Do you enjoy viewing vintage testing equipment in use? If so, then be advised that all this and more can be experienced in just under 10 minutes in the confidential Chevrolet sales film Modern Engineering Series: Volume Three, Torque Talk.

Of course, there are head-to-head comparisons between Chevrolet, Ford, and Plymouth, as well. All three cars are said to be similar models with comparable prices, standard V-8 engines, and automatic transmissions. The model names weren’t revealed, however, nor were any descriptions of the competing engines.

Using “standard V-8 engines” as a guide, to provide additional context, here are some specs that were published for the new models in the February 1955 annual auto issue of Popular Mechanics. Chevy’s 265-cu.in. V-8 was listed at 162 hp and 257 lb-ft of torque. Quite similar in stats was Ford’s 272-cu.in. V-8 at 162 hp and 258 lb-ft of torque. Plymouth’s V-8 was listed as 260-cu.in. (commonly known as a 259) and rated at 167 hp and 230 lb-ft of torque. However, Plymouth had used a 241-cu.in. V-8 engine with 157 hp earlier, so the test car may have had that engine. All of the above engines had two-barrel carburetors.

Watch the test video on Hemmings Daily.

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#1

Re: Engineers Test the New 1955 Chevrolet Against the Competition

10/31/2017 1:27 PM

Looks very similar to the one my Dad ran into a Santa Gertrudis cow in going 80.

The cow did not make it, but everyone in the car was OK, except one sprained ankle.

The hood of the car was rolled up like a sardine can lid.

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#2

Re: Engineers Test the New 1955 Chevrolet Against the Competition

10/31/2017 3:43 PM

Land Rover beat that....pulling 100 tonne train...

...but the record still stands of 4 models pulling a 448 ton locomotive...

...they're thin but wiry

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Re: Engineers Test the New 1955 Chevrolet Against the Competition

10/31/2017 5:00 PM

Never under-estimate the power or the physical strength of a woman!

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Re: Engineers Test the New 1955 Chevrolet Against the Competition

11/08/2017 9:35 PM

How much force does it require to pull a train on level ground?

The rolling resistance of steel wheels on steel track is .001 - .0024. This means that to pull each ton (2000 lb) at a steady speed would require 2 - 4.8 pounds.

Each additional pound per ton would accelerate the train by 32.2/2000 = .0161 ft/sec2, taking about 1 minute to increase the speed by 1 ft/sec.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolling_resistance#Physical_formulas

An unloaded train car weighs about 22 tons, a coach car about 45 tons and a locomotive about 100 tons.

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