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Hemmings Motor News Blog Blog

Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

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The First Funny Car – Dick Landy’s Dodge Hemi Coronet Heads to Auction in Florida

Posted December 04, 2017 10:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: auction classic auto dodge funny car

The 12 B-bodies rolled out by Chrysler in late 1964 for Factory Experimental drag racing didn’t look quite right, especially in profile. Out back, a massive overhang was created by moving the rear wheels forward 15 inches, while up front, the tires – moved 10 inches in the same direction – nearly scraped the bumper. “Funny Cars,” the fans called them, and soon a new racing class was born. In January, the altered-wheelbase 1965 Hemi-powered Dodge Coronet originally shipped to Dick Landy and believed to be the first of the modified “funny cars” raced heads to auction, part of Mecum’s sale in Kissimmee, Florida.

For the program, Chrysler supplied six Dodge Coronets and six Plymouth Furys Satellites, each (except for a single Plymouth “test mule”) issued to a Mopar-sponsored racer. Bodies in white were shipped from Chrysler’s Los Angeles assembly plant to a third-party contractor for “chemical milling,” an alternative description of the acid-dipping process that shaved 200 pounds of weight (but occasionally made strength and rigidity an issue).

This Mopar legend hits the auction block. What is it worth?

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