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Hemmings Motor News Blog Blog

Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

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The Stoner T: How to Build a Hot Rod in 10 Years (and Influence People), Part Three

Posted December 12, 2017 9:00 AM by dstrohl
Pathfinder Tags: hot rod memories project car

Hot rodding has reached an interesting stage of its life: For the sake of argument, it’s developed over the last 70 years into its own industry, language, art form… culture, really. And over those seven decades, certain unwritten rules have been used to define its specific genres: A hot rod is not a street rod, which is not a show car, which shouldn’t be confused with a custom, which is different from a lowrider, and don’t even get me started on what a rat rod is or isn’t. But, all these well-defined categories have roots in hot rodding, somehow.

I mention all this rootsy stuff because I want to make it clear that this car is not so unique that it shouldn’t elicit the “It’s all been done before” comments. Nothing new under the sun, right? I’ll take it even a step further and say that timeless good style is exactly that: A Model T coupe can make for an aesthetically perfect hot rod, as long as its builder adheres to the Golden Ratio of hot rodding. But once time-tested theorems are challenged, things can go south pretty quickly.

The next installment of this hot rod story continues on Hemmings Daily.

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