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Memory Storage

10/11/2015 12:46 PM

I have a dout that is all of us know the data of any file or media should be stored in binary language that is 0's and 1's.I dont no how the data will be stored in the form of zeros and ones how it is possible .Please explain this one Please semd me the explatation with an detail and tell the websites link

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#1

Re: Memory storage

10/11/2015 1:15 PM

Form your previous posts, you really need to concentrate your course study in internet searching (101) and (101a) using search engines. You will soon realize CR4 is not a homework cheat site, we don't mind helping people who will at least put forth a little effort in researching their own questions.

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#2
In reply to #1

Re: Memory storage

10/11/2015 2:22 PM

Izzat 5 and 5a? :-)

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#3

Re: Memory storage

10/11/2015 3:29 PM

Study this link. The bits put together into nibbles, bytes, words, constitute the binary/octal/decimal/hexadecimal representation of the individual characters. String enough of them together, and they represent the words, sentences, paragraphs, books, and whole libraries of mankind.

A single board, or a single brick is not a house. But if you string enough of them together in a predetermined pattern, you can make houses, villages, nations, and worlds.

I must be tired of reading or writing "reported" to all the spam post this weekend. I'm even willing to help with homework. Bad Kilowat0!

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#4

Re: Memory storage

10/11/2015 5:06 PM

Learn how to use a search engine.

You can't posasibly be as helpless as you seem.

Somehow you managed to stumble onto this site, use whatever skills you had to get here to and do your own work.

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#5

Re: Memory storage

10/11/2015 5:36 PM

..."A modern digital computer represents data using the binary numeral system. Text, numbers, pictures, audio, and nearly any other form of information can be converted into a string of bits, or binary digits, each of which has a value of 1 or 0. The most common unit of storage is the byte, equal to 8 bits. A piece of information can be handled by any computer or device whose storage space is large enough to accommodate the binary representation of the piece of information, or simply data. For example, the complete works of Shakespeare, about 1250 pages in print, can be stored in about five megabytes (40 million bits) with one byte per character.

Data is encoded by assigning a bit pattern to each character, digit, or multimedia object. Many standards exist for encoding (e.g., character encodings like ASCII, image encodings like JPEG, video encodings like MPEG-4).

By adding bits to each encoded unit, the redundancy allows the computer both to detect errors in coded data and to correct them based on mathematical algorithms. Errors occur regularly in low probabilities due to random bit value flipping, or "physical bit fatigue", loss of the physical bit in storage its ability to maintain distinguishable value (0 or 1), or due to errors in inter or intra-computer communication. A random bit flip (e.g., due to random radiation) is typically corrected upon detection. A bit, or a group of malfunctioning physical bits (not always the specific defective bit is known; group definition depends on specific storage device) is typically automatically fenced-out, taken out of use by the device, and replaced with another functioning equivalent group in the device, where the corrected bit values are restored (if possible). The cyclic redundancy check (CRC) method is typically used in communications and storage for error detection. A detected error is then retried.

Data compression methods allow in many cases to represent a string of bits by a shorter bit string ("compress") and reconstruct the original string ("decompress") when needed. This utilizes substantially less storage (tens of percents) for many types of data at the cost of more computation (compress and decompress when needed). Analysis of trade-off between storage cost saving and costs of related computations and possible delays in data availability is done before deciding whether to keep certain data in a database compressed or not."...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_data_storage

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#6

Re: Memory storage

10/11/2015 6:58 PM

Think billions and billions of switches sequenced in near-infinite combination.

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#7

Re: Memory storage

10/11/2015 7:18 PM

This is your post translated into binary code.....

01001001 00100000 01101000 01100001 01110110 01100101 00100000 01100001 00100000 01100100 01101111 01110101 01110100 00100000 01110100 01101000 01100001 01110100 00100000 01101001 01110011 00100000 01100001 01101100 01101100 00100000 01101111 01100110 00100000 01110101 01110011 00100000 01101011 01101110 01101111 01110111 00100000 01110100 01101000 01100101 00100000 01100100 01100001 01110100 01100001 00100000 01101111 01100110 00100000 01100001 01101110 01111001 00100000 01100110 01101001 01101100 01100101 00100000 01101111 01110010 00100000 01101101 01100101 01100100 01101001 01100001 00100000 01110011 01101000 01101111 01110101 01101100 01100100 00100000 01100010 01100101 00100000 01110011 01110100 01101111 01110010 01100101 01100100 00100000 01101001 01101110 00100000 01100010 01101001 01101110 01100001 01110010 01111001 00100000 01101100 01100001 01101110 01100111 01110101 01100001 01100111 01100101 00100000 01110100 01101000 01100001 01110100 00100000 01101001 01110011 00100000 00110000 00100111 01110011 00100000 01100001 01101110 01100100 00100000 00110001 00100111 01110011 00101110 01001001 00100000 01100100 01101111 01101110 01110100 00100000 01101110 01101111 00100000 01101000 01101111 01110111 00100000 01110100 01101000 01100101 00100000 01100100 01100001 01110100 01100001 00100000 01110111 01101001 01101100 01101100 00100000 01100010 01100101 00100000 01110011 01110100 01101111 01110010 01100101 01100100 00100000 01101001 01101110 00100000 01110100 01101000 01100101 00100000 01100110 01101111 01110010 01101101 00100000 01101111 01100110 00100000 01111010 01100101 01110010 01101111 01110011 00100000 01100001 01101110 01100100 00100000 01101111 01101110 01100101 01110011 00100000 01101000 01101111 01110111 00100000 01101001 01110100 00100000 01101001 01110011 00100000 01110000 01101111 01110011 01110011 01101001 01100010 01101100 01100101 00100000 00101110 01010000 01101100 01100101 01100001 01110011 01100101 00100000 01100101 01111000 01110000 01101100 01100001 01101001 01101110 00100000 01110100 01101000 01101001 01110011 00100000 01101111 01101110 01100101 00100000 01010000 01101100 01100101 01100001 01110011 01100101 00100000 01110011 01100101 01101101 01100100 00100000 01101101 01100101 00100000 01110100 01101000 01100101 00100000 01100101 01111000 01110000 01101100 01100001 01110100 01100001 01110100 01101001 01101111 01101110 00100000 01110111 01101001 01110100 01101000 00100000 01100001 01101110 00100000 01100100 01100101 01110100 01100001 01101001 01101100 00100000 01100001 01101110 01100100 00100000 01110100 01100101 01101100 01101100 00100000 01110100 01101000 01100101 00100000 01110111 01100101 01100010 01110011 01101001 01110100 01100101 01110011 00100000 01101100 01101001 01101110 01101011

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#8
In reply to #7

Re: Memory storage

10/11/2015 7:32 PM

I'm sorry, but there's a 1 out of place.

Maybe you did that on purpose?

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#9
In reply to #8

Re: Memory storage

10/11/2015 7:53 PM

One what?

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#10
In reply to #9

Re: Memory storage

10/11/2015 9:07 PM

Bit.

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#11
In reply to #10

Re: Memory storage

10/11/2015 9:12 PM

Probably radiation effect....

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#12
In reply to #7

Re: Memory storage

10/11/2015 11:31 PM

Actually,there are two offsetting errors that are hard to spot.

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#14
In reply to #7

Re: Memory storage

10/11/2015 11:59 PM

Am I the only one that noticed that one of the 0s was typed as an o?

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#16
In reply to #14

Re: Memory storage

10/12/2015 1:36 AM

That's the legal loophole....

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#13

Re: Memory Storage

10/11/2015 11:45 PM

search the internet with the word ( hexadecimal )

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#15

Re: Memory Storage

10/12/2015 12:39 AM

There are 10 types of people on this earth. Those who understand Binary and those who do not.

BAB

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#17

Re: Memory Storage

10/12/2015 3:36 AM

I don't know how old you are, but I do believe that the school systems in most countries will have covered Binary, (Octal and Hex slightly less maybe, but they are really part and parcel of binary) by the time a pupil is 11 years old or maybe even less nowadays.

In my Grammar School in the UK, around 1959 (I was almost 13!), we actually built a binary "adder/Subtractor" using multi pole switches and small light bulbs and a 4.5 volt battery, which might make school children of today laugh, but it was quite a serious achievement for the time, though we could only add up to 16 Decimal....as although computers were around, then, they were mostly power hungry valve (tube) designs and really only for scientific and similar purposes....

The UK money system of the day (and Imperial weights and measures of the time) proved to be a huge help in allowing us to add in various MIXED bases without even considering it a problem!!

I remember "helping" a Yale university professor to pay his bill in a restaurant in the mid 1960's, because he could not get his (mathematical) head round the fact that he had to be able to add up and subtract in base 2, base 4, base 12, base 20, (and occasionally even base 21) to add up his single bill!!

Only older past residents of the UK may understand this!!!

It was the finest training for working in computers that anyone could have!!! Most people never even noticed that!!

I did find a web site for you to read and learn on, see here:-

Binary numbers

You need to study more and learn better if you have already covered this at school.....

It is also a very simple system and you should not need to bother ANYONE here with such frivolous questions in the future.....

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#20
In reply to #17

Re: Memory Storage

10/12/2015 5:27 PM

I was going to add International Morse as a digital representation, but others have done a really good job answering the question.

YOUR post brought back memories of Swindon, Marlborough, Ogbourne, Aldbourne and St Piran's. Ha'pence, pence, tuppence, thruppence and yes, the occasional farthing. Is it possible that helps with Binary and Hex? EBCDIC?

Cortland Richmond (St Piran's, 1954, not graduated)

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#21
In reply to #20

Re: Memory Storage

10/12/2015 6:34 PM

I used to manipulate in Binary Octal and Hex without a calculator, just in my head....Its a lot slower (my head!) than it was then........

Using various bases MUST help......but today everything is decimal, sadly!!

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#18

Re: Memory Storage

10/12/2015 4:09 AM

www.dogpile.com

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#19

Re: Memory Storage

10/12/2015 7:34 AM

binary language ??? (woogled out´he Binary language - Memory Alpha, the Star Trek Wiki)

there are terms such as computer lang. and programming lang. -- the related terms are syntax e.c.

fast your question Unicode(/ASCii) → hex → binary → "file_format_filter"/encoding_scheme → low_level_data_storage_filter/hardware_encoding_scheme → actual_bits_in_File system (as by Wikipedia)

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#22

Re: Memory Storage

10/12/2015 8:20 PM

I think he has a point here. Where do all these 0's and 1's come from?

There must be some cost to turn a 0 into a 1, right? Who pays for it?

And what about the fiber optics ... they work on some sort of magical red light with laser beams and stuff. Who pays for the lasers? How do you turn a laser into a 0 or a 1?

What happens if the circuit gets a 2, 3, 4 instead of a 0 or 1? Is there a conspiracy?

Finally, what happened to Jimmy Hoffa? Does anyone know where he's at?

I hope someone can answer these questions.

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#24
In reply to #22

Re: Memory Storage

10/20/2015 6:30 AM

Jimmy Hoffa's condo is right next door to Jiminy Cricket. You can only bend the long 'ones' into a zero, and of course, you pay for all the fibre-optics, laser beams and stuff.

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#23

Re: Memory Storage

10/12/2015 9:57 PM

An easy way to learn to count in binary is to imagine an odometer with only 2 digits: a one and a zero.

Start with all zeros.

When the zero changes to a one, nothing happens to the adjacent digit when the

zero rolls over to a one.

So you have 01 binary, which is a decimal 1

When the one rolls over to a zero again,the next digit rolls over to a one.

So then you have 10,which is decimal 2.

Followed by 11,which is decimal 3.

Each position to the left doubles in value,just like in the decimal system,where each digit increases by 10 times as they move from right to left.

This process continues with as many digits as you assign to the "odometer".

The ones and zero's are simple for the computer.

It is simply "on" or "off" ;a one or a zero.

In order to simplify the writing of large numbers,several shorthand methods were developed.

The first was octal,represented by a group of 3 binary digits,with a maximum value of 7; (111)

Next came Hexadecimal, grouped in groups of four digits,with a maximum value of 15,and the numbers running from 0---9 and A through F.

There are many more number systems out there,but I have briefly touched on the most common types.

You can develop any type of number system with this method.

A one or zero can be a north or south magnetic pole,or a positive or negative electrical charge,the presence of a light pulse or not,a variation in frequency, or amplitude,phase,or polarization and many other ways.

When you must eat an elephant,you must do it one bite or nibble at the time(pardon the pun).

Start by learning binary, and logic ,and how to build gates and simple flip flops,and and let that spur your curiosity onward.

Good luck in your new learning adventure.

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