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Transfer of Heat Marks From Steel Plates to Cut Parts

01/14/2016 10:40 PM

Guys,

There is a need to transfer the heat marks on steel plates (carbon and stainless steel) to the pieces that are cut from it for traceability and identification. Conventionally lettered/numbered punches are used and the string of characters manually transferred to each component. Needless to say, when there is a lot of steel being cut there is a lot of manual work and noise.

What other practice are you aware of that transfers these heat markings? Would appreciate information based on a actual practices in fabrication shops.

Thanks

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#1

Re: Transfer of heat marks from steel plates to cut parts

01/14/2016 11:00 PM

I'd say this depends on the level of traceability and identification you require.

There isn't any way to determine that with the information provided.

This might help:

Identification and traceability - What is ISO 9001?

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#2
In reply to #1

Re: Transfer of heat marks from steel plates to cut parts

01/14/2016 11:11 PM

Lyn,

Thanks for your inputs.

We know what we need to transfer from the plate supplied from the mill to the cut components (basically the heat mark that is available on the plate). The question is if there is a better way to transfer those marks - we painstakingly use lettered punches and hammer the character, each character punched in followed by the next. This is time consuming and noisy. I am looking for a way that makes the process faster and less noisy. Cannot use paint or dyes - need the marks to be 'permanent'.

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#3
In reply to #2

Re: Transfer of heat marks from steel plates to cut parts

01/14/2016 11:35 PM

Laser marking seems relevant here.

Then, the only problem is custody of the parts from the parent piece to the marking room.

If you were confident in your material transfer process before, then you should be OK using the same process now.

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#4
In reply to #3

Re: Transfer of heat marks from steel plates to cut parts

01/14/2016 11:41 PM

Yes, confident of the process of marking but the laser system has to work in the shop where the plates are cut and the marks transferred.

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#5
In reply to #4

Re: Transfer of heat marks from steel plates to cut parts

01/14/2016 11:49 PM

That's your problem, not mine.

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#6
In reply to #4

Re: Transfer of heat marks from steel plates to cut parts

01/14/2016 11:50 PM

Why not traditional engraving....?

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#7

Re: Transfer of heat marks from steel plates to cut parts

01/15/2016 4:20 AM

Ash55, I don't know where you work that it's quiet and fast while processing steel? Lyn posted a good link in #1reply.

When I was working QA for a scaffolding/ man lift manufacture, it was not quick nor was it quiet! They we're certified ISO so we had to show traceability from the time the raw material came through the receiving gate up to the shipping gate and every process in between. Raw material had batch numbers that we logged on the processing orders and each employee had their own steel stamp that they would stamp each piece of metal they processed, whether it was cut, formed or welded. From there the batch number was noted on the manufacturing work order. Electrical and the paint department were the only one who didn't have a processing stamp on the metal parts. Time wise, if each employee stamped their own work, it doesn't slow the process down.

There's nothing quick or quiet while processing metal, short cuts are not allowed if you want traceability. As always in any industrial setting, safety is paramount.

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#8

Re: Transfer of heat marks from steel plates to cut parts

01/15/2016 8:00 AM

I use a portable hand held dot peen machine; key the information in and pull the trigger. You'll need compressed air and a 110v source. It can do multiple lines, has variable fonts, and is quite easy to use. It's not exactly quiet, but it's a lot faster than a hammer and stamps. There are a several manufacturers and they would all be happy to demonstrate their equipment.

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#11
In reply to #8

Re: Transfer of heat marks from steel plates to cut parts

01/15/2016 8:58 PM

This seems like what I am looking for. Yes there is still the noise issue but it is faster and less prone to mistakes for repititive entries. Thanks a lot

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#9

Re: Transfer of heat marks from steel plates to cut parts

01/15/2016 10:17 AM

Is acid etching acceptable for the end use?

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#12
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Re: Transfer of heat marks from steel plates to cut parts

01/15/2016 8:59 PM

No, not acceptable for end use at all.

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#10

Re: Transfer of Heat Marks From Steel Plates to Cut Parts

01/15/2016 12:03 PM

Electroplate the data on. Lots of folk put their product info on their metal products with an electroplating or electromarking systems. Cheap... fast... quiet.

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#13
In reply to #10

Re: Transfer of Heat Marks From Steel Plates to Cut Parts

01/15/2016 9:00 PM

No, don't think that will work.. thanks for your suggestions gentlemen. You all have been very helpful

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#15
In reply to #13

Re: Transfer of Heat Marks From Steel Plates to Cut Parts

01/16/2016 12:40 AM

Why not?

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#16
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Re: Transfer of Heat Marks From Steel Plates to Cut Parts

01/16/2016 12:57 AM

Imagine a CS plate 36 mm thick, 2000 m wide and 6 m long.. and this plate is cut into rounds, sections etc . All these cut pieces need to be marked with the heat stamp as the main plate. So a piece may weigh 50 kg to 200 kg. Thats why

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#18
In reply to #16

Re: Transfer of Heat Marks From Steel Plates to Cut Parts

01/16/2016 1:07 PM

So your saying your cutting cs stock that's 2km wide? Is this a typo? Or you at a foundry and your worried about noise? That has to be one he'll of a plant to produce 2000 m wide stock!

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#23
In reply to #18

Re: Transfer of Heat Marks From Steel Plates to Cut Parts

01/16/2016 10:10 PM

Sorry ..typo.. its 2 m wide..

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#14

Re: Transfer of Heat Marks From Steel Plates to Cut Parts

01/15/2016 10:26 PM

Ashok,
Here's a direct impact marker suited to smaller parts. It handles carbon steel and stainless steel:
http://www.rolanddg.com/product/3d/udi/mpx-90m/index.html

Mark Bingham
Relativity PL

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#17

Re: Transfer of Heat Marks From Steel Plates to Cut Parts

01/16/2016 7:06 AM

We use a small electro-chemical marking system to mark some steel parts. It is quick, cheap, simple & silent. The stencils are typed onto plastic tape using a hand held device similar to a Dymo marker. This video shows a similar system in use, skip to the 3:00 minute mark to see parts being marked. In the video they use pre-made stencils but you can make these on the fly with the hand held printer.

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#19

Re: Transfer of Heat Marks From Steel Plates to Cut Parts

01/16/2016 2:16 PM

What standards are you working to?

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#22
In reply to #19

Re: Transfer of Heat Marks From Steel Plates to Cut Parts

01/16/2016 10:10 PM

ASME

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#20

Re: Transfer of Heat Marks From Steel Plates to Cut Parts

01/16/2016 9:11 PM

You haven't said how you cut the sheet. I have had components laser cut and marked with a logo by the same machine. I believe it isn't easy to 'turn down' the laser so that it just marks the surface. The logo i had marked wouldn't have survived rumbling, shot peening, acid etching or been visible through paint. BUT it is a process that takes very little time and is done at the same time as the piece is cut out.

Jim

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#21
In reply to #20

Re: Transfer of Heat Marks From Steel Plates to Cut Parts

01/16/2016 10:09 PM

Jim,

Plasma cutting. So yes, not easy to turn down the power to do marking.. and again.. using it for marking will occupy the cutting machine.. for less productive (though very important) task.

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#24
In reply to #21

Re: Transfer of Heat Marks From Steel Plates to Cut Parts

01/17/2016 7:52 PM

O.K. Just one more thing. I was always told not to use the portion that had been stamped as there were stress raisers as a result of the stamping. Are your components not vulnerable to stress? Was i misinformed?

Jim

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