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Join Date: Sep 2016
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Reliability Engineer

09/18/2016 1:42 AM

what qualification do some one need to acquire to be called Reliability Engineer?

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#1

Re: Reliability Engineer

09/18/2016 2:20 AM

I am at a loss for words... as you seem to be. But here, this may help.

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#2

Re: Reliability Engineer

09/18/2016 10:04 AM
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#3

Re: Reliability Engineer

09/18/2016 5:46 PM

In three words: Education, education, education...

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#4

Re: Reliability Engineer

09/19/2016 12:37 PM

I have that title in my current position. The first thing to know is what field you are in and what your company does. Obviously, reliability involves very different things in an computer networking position as opposed to say a production plant that does fermentations, or a quarry that mines salt. So I would suggest some familiarity with, and education in the processes you will be monitoring. Basically, it seems the job is about keeping things running smoothly and controlling costs.

This is what I have learned in the years since I took this job. In my position at a fermentation plant what I do is primarily data management and maintenance scheduling. However, understanding the manufacturing processes involved and how the machinery works is necessary. Being good at math and knowing how to do actuarial progressions is a must in my position. Cost benefit/analysis in another good tool. Time/motion studies and statistics will help too. I am involved in troubleshooting and problem solving regarding machinery and processes. I was required to create a periodic maintenance schedule for all equipment including "just in time" parts delivery scheduling to reduce warehousing costs. I had to develope and institute a management of change process to document and validate equipment, process changes, and obsolescence. I also have input and decision making responsibilities on purchasing of new equipment and hiring of contractors. This may not may not be a standard experience or job description.

Those are the things I have learned from doing. My formal education or previous experience had nothing to do with this job and did not seem to be a major factor in my hiring. That I was hired for this job I still consider a fluke, not the norm. I can tell you I did struggle for quite some time before starting to feel as though I could actually do this job. I hope that helps some.

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#5

Re: Reliability Engineer

09/19/2016 1:46 PM

what qualification to aquire?

First and foremost: Reliability

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#6

Re: Reliability Engineer

09/19/2016 2:42 PM

I'm thinking the only qualification you need to be a Reliability Engineer is the ability to write "Reliability Engineer" after your name. If I had a manufacturing company that made widgets, and you were my "right-hand man"; a man I could count on when the Metal shear broke down, or the toilet was plugged, or the lawn mower needed fixing, or the hydraulic press was out of fluid or whatever else one could imagine, you, Sir, would be my Reliability Engineer". It is a moniker bestowed upon a man you can't do without. A man who, if forced into the position, could probably run your company as well as you. I suspect that small companies would have a Reliability Engineer, but that larger companies may not. I looked at the curriculum of several schools of higher learning and found that, of those offering degrees in Reliability Engineering the vast majority were upper level degrees. They required you to have at least a mechanical engineering degree, a hydraulic engineering, or almost ANY engineering related degree to get a Reliability Engineering degree. It appears that degree is more or less an extension of another degree. I may be wrong...Just my observation.

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#7

Re: Reliability Engineer

09/19/2016 5:12 PM

Others have provided you with some helpful links.

Here is another one about becoming a certified reliability engineer.

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#8

Re: Reliability Engineer

09/21/2016 2:40 PM

That is my title as well.

Reliability Engineering is centered around asset management. ISO 55000 is the new applicable standard. Familiarization with that will put you way ahead of the game.

Other areas include Root Cause Analysis, Criticality Ranking, Failure Modes and Effects Analysis, Reliability Centered Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, Condition Based Monitoring, Predictive Maintenance, Planning and Scheduling, Spare Parts Management, and Precision Maintenance.

Understand all those things and you'll be a Reliability guru. The two major certifications in reliability are the CRL (Certified Reliability Leader) and the CMRP (Certified Maintenance and Reliability Professional).

Basic knowledge of predictive technologies (vibration analysis, ultrasound, infrared thermography, motor circuit analysis, lubrication, oil analysis) is of further benefit, though these are often contracted by companies with "Reliability" programs.

Engineering certificate programs in Reliability are starting to pop up around the country, but formal university programs are still fairly scarce. The University of Tennessee probably has the most developed program or at least the most publicized. Check it out if you are looking for further education.

With all that said, Reliability Engineer is merely a title that any company could give you.

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