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Graphene & Silly Putty

12/12/2016 12:12 PM

What's not to like with this combination?

It seems that this combination makes the core of a very sensitive pressure transducer. A heart monitor is but one possible use.

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#1

Re: Graphene & Silly Putty

12/12/2016 12:22 PM

spider walking detection

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#2

Re: Graphene & Silly Putty

12/12/2016 12:31 PM

Cool! I wonder if it would work just as well with non-graphene forms of carbon which also conduct electricity; common graphite for instance? Old style telephone microphones were basically variable resistors that used carbon granules. Maybe this stuff could work as a microphone also?

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#11
In reply to #2

Re: Graphene & Silly Putty

12/13/2016 11:36 AM

Do you ever wonder what can't be done with graphene? My understanding of G-putty is that the thinness of the graphite conductor is key to creating a thin putty. Presumably another material with similar properties would work too.

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#3

Re: Graphene & Silly Putty

12/12/2016 12:53 PM

So, if I have a silly putty monitor, if I fall flat on my face will I bounce right back upright?

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#4
In reply to #3

Re: Graphene & Silly Putty

12/12/2016 1:09 PM

Put it in your shoes and add some bounce to your step? Meanwhile the stuff could be the transducer for a Dr. Scholl's pedometer. Meanwhile on another thread they're using ABC gum for for literally gumboots. What will they think of next? New uses for 'spent' Skoal <graphic details omitted>.

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#5

Re: Graphene & Silly Putty

12/13/2016 8:53 AM

You beat me to it -- I wrote this news post for Engineering 360 but you published first: http://insights.globalspec.com/article/3785/graphene-infused-silly-putty-for-medical-sensors

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#6

Re: Graphene & Silly Putty

12/13/2016 10:26 AM

Sounds like one could also make an interesting strain gauge out of this? For example, one wants to know how much flexure a flat portion of Lexan might have against pressure applied under it, and somehow we mount this sensor in contact with the upper surface (rigid mount that would not impinge on the plastic).

Perhaps the pressure inside the device could be read off as well?

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#7
In reply to #6

Re: Graphene & Silly Putty

12/13/2016 10:34 AM

I'm wondering if very slow deflection (creep) could be measured?

I can see a rapid flexing being sensed.

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#8
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Re: Graphene & Silly Putty

12/13/2016 10:38 AM

A creep gauge, not a creep detector would be highly useful in engineering.

Creep detectors already exist, can be found deployed in many night spots.

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#10
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Re: Graphene & Silly Putty

12/13/2016 11:01 AM

From the article:"But if you pull it very, very slowly, it will flow as if it's a liquid, a viscous liquid," [with no induced stress]

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#12
In reply to #7

Re: Graphene & Silly Putty

12/13/2016 1:12 PM

Seems to me it's basically just a variable-cross-section carbon resistor. A carbon-impregnated elastomer might work just as well, especially for 'stationary' applications like strain sensing. At least you wouldn't have to put it back in its egg overnight.

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#9
In reply to #6

Re: Graphene & Silly Putty

12/13/2016 10:59 AM

It'll be interesting to see how many other areas of engineering will develop applications for G-putty. AMBER (Advanced Materials and BioEngineering Research), the institute sponsoring this research, has, as its name indicates, a focus on biomedical applications. The press release indicated that they are pursing commercialization, so this isn't a pie-in-the-sky, give us another three or four years to turn the idea into a product.

But don't look for any G-putty in your Christmas stocking .

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