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Furnace Oil Viscosity

12/26/2016 2:55 AM

hello,

our company is using heavy furnace oil grade 180 in UAE since Aug-2016,

i just want to know what impact can come if kinematic viscosity is higher then standard

in furnace oil

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#1

Re: Furnace oil viscosity

12/26/2016 8:28 AM

Simple, how do you blow a very hard mucos on your nose? Or cough out a sticky phelgm?

Answer?

You need help. Help cost you your medical insurance and some time. Or confine to a nearest hospital in your place.

Its the same thing. The only difference is you cant replace your nose and lungs easy by purchasing a new bigger one. But for pumps and motors you can resize, or some says "dont fix it when its not broken". "Common sense dictates"

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#2

Re: Furnace Oil Viscosity

12/26/2016 11:03 AM

It will be more resistant to flow. Thicker.

What does your furnace operator's manual say about the viscosity range that is acceptable for your furnace.

What did the furnace tech say when you called him?

What have you done so far, besides go to an anonymous forum and ask its members to do your job for you?

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#9
In reply to #2

Re: Furnace Oil Viscosity

12/28/2016 7:08 AM

thanks,

we have done a lab testing and viscosity found higher then standard value

our furnace people say there are carbon deposits on the tip of nozzle

is it possible that we can get oil always @ same specifications although we know its coming from earth with control only at the time of instillation

i just want to know impacts of high viscosity

pls don't be annoyed

thanks

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#10
In reply to #9

Re: Furnace Oil Viscosity

12/28/2016 7:54 AM

Always bear in mind that viscosity is entirely temperature-dependent.

<...get oil always @ same specifications...>

It is unlikely that an out-of-tolerance fuel would prove desirable for sustaining long-term purchase and supply agreements. The furnace designer will have given a viscosity band for the tolerable fuel and the fuel supplier will have given a tolerance band for the viscosity of the fuel. The fuel supplied will fall into both bands to provide an acceptable furnace operating regime.

Were the fuel used to fall outside the furnace designer's recommendations then it is entirely possible for the designer and supplier to walk away from any warranty issues, either expressed or implied. It would be akin to putting diesel into a petrol engine and expecting the engine supplier to put right the damage at the engine supplier's expense.

If the fuel supplied is outside the contracted tolerance limits then there are commercial remedies including, though not limited to, the following:

  • not paying for it
  • paying less for it
  • changing supplier.

If the fuel is to be used as opposed to returned to the supplier then the only real thing to do is to blend the fuel with other stocks until the viscosity of the blend is within tolerance for use.

Using an out-of-tolerance fuel without modifying the furnace to cope with it invites the prospect of, and not limited to, the following:

  • furnace under-performance
  • a build-up of deferred maintenance problems
  • immediate maintenance problems
  • environmental problems such as soot and smoke
  • health and safety risks to operatives and to those in the neighbourhood

There are legal remedies after the event to most of the above, though the only real winners in legal situations are the legal professionals themselves, whose job it is to make an income out of their clients' misery.

An Engineer's job is to make sure it is right first time. One of the possibilities is to invoke a procedure to have the fuel measured for acceptability and approved for use before sanctioning its unloading from the supply vehicle; this is common practice for chemicals supplied to the bulk pharmaceutical manufacturing industry, for example, where everything has to be right first time.

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#11
In reply to #9

Re: Furnace Oil Viscosity

12/28/2016 8:14 AM

Changing the temperature of the fuel upon use is another way of bringing the viscosity within limits.

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#12
In reply to #9

Re: Furnace Oil Viscosity

12/28/2016 8:41 AM

Mr. Kamran:

To address the issue of carbon deposits on nozzles, could you perhaps introduce a small flow of hydrogen into the furnace to increase flame velocity in the vicinity of the nozzles? It works on engines designed to run on bunker C, to improve fuel economy by 30% (meaning that the entire charge of fuel is combusted properly in the engine).

I suspect the same might work in this case, especially if the hydrogen emitter nozzles are very near the oil nozzles. It will take only a very small fraction of hydrogen.

Another consideration is small volume steam injection near the nozzles, but I have no positive diagnosis on that one.

You still must address the physical characteristic of the fuel oil, either by cutting with diesel or kerosene, or by line heaters that reduce the viscosity.

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#13
In reply to #9

Re: Furnace Oil Viscosity

01/01/2017 2:30 PM

A furnace is a system, and focusing on just one component, the viscosity, while ignoring another, the carbon deposits, will not help you solve your problem(s).

I would be exploring if there's a correlation between the carbon deposits and the viscosity. Depending upon the exact type of fuel delivery system, a thicker fuel may affect the delivery rate. Depending upon the burner management system, the lower delivery rate may affect the flame pattern. Depending upon the boiler management system, a flame pattern closer to the burner tip may affect the flame temperature, which may upset the fuel/air ratio leading to poor combustion, resulting in carbon fouling, etc., etc.

Running an efficient, non-polluting boiler relies on understanding how all the pieces play together, and knowing how any off-spec parameters affect its proper operation.

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#3

Re: Furnace Oil Viscosity

12/26/2016 11:10 AM

The impact is that the furnace must be designed and built specifically for this type of heavy fuel...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuel_oil

http://www.viscopedia.com/viscosity-tables/substances/bunker-oil-marine-fuel-oil/

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#4

Re: Furnace Oil Viscosity

12/27/2016 8:29 AM

The burning of the oil may be less efficient, as the nozzle design will make larger droplets. Your piping will see slightly higher pressure, and the pump may work more than expected. The higher viscosity doesn't necessarily mean higher fuel value, so you may see a reduction in heat. You may be able to compensate for all of these effects with a higher oil temperature.

It is likely that the heat of the furnace and the atomizing method, steam or mechanical, will make any of these differences too small to measure, depending on just how far from the original design viscosity you are.

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#5
In reply to #4

Re: Furnace Oil Viscosity

12/27/2016 2:28 PM

I agree with what rwilliams posted. Heating a slightly higher viscosity heating oil with a line electrical heater can be done safely, and would likely get the product into a workable range for your burners.

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#6

Re: Furnace Oil Viscosity

12/27/2016 4:42 PM

Ok, Mildred. How did that come about?

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#7

Re: Furnace Oil Viscosity

12/27/2016 4:50 PM

Did you test the viscosity at a standard temperature also?

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#8

Re: Furnace Oil Viscosity

12/28/2016 4:05 AM

Either kaboom or phut; the smart money is on phut.

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