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Participant

Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 2

Conveyor Belt Dilemma

04/17/2017 2:03 AM

i have a sheet cutting machine that delivers

corrugated sheets at the speed of 45 meters/min.

i also have another spare conveyor belt system that runs at

1 meter / min. can i use this conveyor belt to collect the sheets from

the cutter, provided the sheets are overlaid over one another.

this will assist in easy collection of sheets by hand from the end of

the conveyor belt system rather than collecting from the cutting machine.

the conveyor belt s/m is 6 meters long

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#1

Re: conveyor belt dilemna

04/17/2017 3:08 AM

The most advanced sheet will have the weight of many others on top of it, and may be difficult to extricate.

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Participant

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#2
In reply to #1

Re: conveyor belt dilemna

04/17/2017 3:50 AM

this is how i am planning to collect the sheets.

my doubt is that whether the conveyor belt speed of

1 meter per min can accommodate the speed of 45 meter per min

from the delivery of the cutting machine. i am confused about

the area concerning linear speed etc.

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#3
In reply to #2

Re: conveyor belt dilemna

04/17/2017 4:01 AM

Well....

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Guru
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#4

Re: conveyor belt dilemna

04/17/2017 4:10 AM

So you'll end up with a stream that is 45 times the material thickness deep, with all the weight on the lower corners of the sheets.

I'd be worried about scratcing of the product where the operator is removing it from the end of the slow conveyor.

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#5

Re: conveyor belt dilemna

04/17/2017 5:02 AM

CR4 is not a permission-giving entity.

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#6

Re: Conveyor Belt Dilemma

04/17/2017 11:03 AM

Sure, go ahead and try it, but we didn't grant you permission or OK this. You will find out shortly thereafter, that this either works for you, or does not work due to product damage, or does not work due to operators losing body parts. I am pretty sure there is one safety violation or another in your near future.

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#7

Re: Conveyor Belt Dilemma

04/17/2017 10:22 PM

You will not be able to remove the sheets.

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#8

Re: Conveyor Belt Dilemma

04/18/2017 5:31 AM

Ideally the clearing conveyor should be travelling slightly faster than the cutter output.

Some thoughts.

1. You say it's a sheet cutter, so assuming a sheet length of say 3 metres, (and assuming my maths is right) then at a rate of production of 45 metres per minute - one sheet per 4 seconds, 45 sheets will have been cut before the clearing conveyor (CC) has moved that 3 metres, with about 68mm offset of each sheet. So there will be 44 sheets on top of the first one before its leading edge reaches the off loading point, and another 45 on top of those before its trailing edge gets there. It won't be possible to remove the lower sheet until its trailing edge comes off the conveyor, however:-

As the trailing edge of each sheet reaches the end of the conveyor - 6 minutes after being cut - it's possible that it could then drop down onto a pallet or similar, each subsequent sheet would follow 4 seconds later - this would likely work better for shorter sheets than for longer ones as the longer ones would tend to bend as they become unsupported by the conveyor (they could be manually supported or with a mechanically operated trolley arrangement). It might not be a recommended method, but may work, the air trapped below the dropping sheet may cushion the drop.

2. The CC will progress about 68mm for each sheet cut. The first sheet will have to slide over the surface of the CC and not dig in, and each successive sheet will then slide over the preceding sheet, scratching is likely particularly for colourbond. The CC would also need to be at least 90mm lower than the output of the cutter to accommodate the growing column of cut sheets, and this could further exacerbate the first sheet dig in and the subsequent damage problem of sheet to sheet sliding particularly at initial steep angles.

Assuming a sheet thickness of 0.8mm, the first 45 sheets will be about 40mm high and increasing as each sheet will move only about 68mm before the next sheet is added to the pack. The pack will be about 80mm high before the first sheet exits the CC and will then remain at that level.

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#9
In reply to #8

Re: Conveyor Belt Dilemma

04/18/2017 6:45 AM

I think that his/her corrugated sheet is what we would call "corflute" from seeing the picture that they posted in their later reply. (Like cardboard with a corrugated centre for strength sandwiched between two flat surface sheets.)

Whether it's plastic or metal, product damage will be the biggest concern, assuming the slow conveyor can handle the mechanical loading.

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#10

Re: Conveyor Belt Dilemma

04/18/2017 6:49 AM

IF i understand it; you are spitting out sheets at 45M/min. They are collecting on a table/roller and being carted off by hand. You want to place a 6M WIDE conveyor to shift the sheets sideways to another area. A 3m sheet loads onto the conveyor at the rate of 1 every 4 seconds and a 6M sheet at the rate of 1 every 8 seconds. The sheets are 860 mm wide and hence the conveyor needs to travel about 1M every time a sheet is loaded. Perhaps every time the guillotine returns to rest position the conveyor is activated, quickly! As has been pointed out scratching is a real concern. The method you show in the pics won't help. They MUST be kept separated. If you look at your despatch area you will see that when short sheets are loaded on top of long sheets, a protective strip of plastic or card is placed under the cut end of the short sheet. BUT, You haven't said if the sheet length varies, i expect it does.

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#11
In reply to #10

Re: Conveyor Belt Dilemma

04/18/2017 9:12 AM

As usual, where is the OP when "sumbody has some 'splainin' to do"?

Lucy???? Lucy???? (reference to Lucille Ball working on assembly line, or packaging line, I forget which).

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#12

Re: Conveyor Belt Dilemma

04/18/2017 9:52 AM

In paper sheeters, this is called the overlap section, where the sheets go on to a stacker to build a ream. The paper is cut at most 4 layers at a time, but ends up 500 layers thick at the end of the line.

This section is about 6 meters long when stacking sheets at 300 meters per minute, but the sheets are much thinner. One interesting design is several thin belts (like plastic box strapping) over the top of the sheets being stacked, so that the top sheet stays down, and is not lifted by air under the sheet.

The top belts are also driven, I suspect at a slower speed than the table belts.

The entry of the top belts is higher, to pull down the leading edge of the next sheet, then tapers down to the finish stack height, just slightly over the table height.

The finish stack starts at the end of the overlap conveyor, and a platform that collects the stack of sheets drops periodically, so that you never have to overlap up-hill. The 6 meter long table just has a line of sheets overlapped maybe halfway, and the stacking is done at the end of the table, dropping as the stack builds.

On a continuous stacker, a thin lightweight table comes out, intercepts the stream from the overlap section, and the finished stack of paper drops out below it, dumps the full stack, and returns to the top position. The thin table retracts, and the next stack continues building, pretty clever way to keep the machine running.

This is a GL&V/Beloit/Lenox Machine design I've described, for a continuous sheeter. http://www.glv.com/Brands/Beloit-Lenox

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#13
In reply to #12

Re: Conveyor Belt Dilemma

04/18/2017 11:23 AM

I am just glad I don't have to be a sheet slitter, and tell people about my job.

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