CR4 - The Engineer's Place for News and Discussion ®


Previous in Forum: The Chemistry of Gold - Blog Flashback!   Next in Forum: Units Converters
Close
Close
Close
Page 1 of 2: « First 1 2 Next > Last »
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136

This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/19/2017 1:49 PM

What kind of plant do you suppose this is. Sorry, no ruler, so you have to guess at the scale, but the entire plant is not more than three feet tall (yet). It was not there at all last winter, so it is first year growth, if perennial.

There are some containers of rain water in the background, collected for "covert" "nuclear energy" experiments I am running out in the country.

And don't fidget me about my ladder storage, I was running out of room in the small work shed.

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Comments rated to be Good Answers:

These comments received enough positive ratings to make them "good answers".

Comments rated to be "almost" Good Answers:

Check out these comments that don't yet have enough votes to be "official" good answers and, if you agree with them, rate them!
Guru
Engineering Fields - Electrical Engineering - Been there, done that, still doing it. Engineering Fields - Control Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Long Island NY
Posts: 12003
Good Answers: 758
#1

Re: This week's episode of Identify the plant

05/19/2017 1:58 PM

Is that a triffid?

__________________
"Don't disturb my circles." translation of Archimedes last words
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#4
In reply to #1

Re: This week's episode of Identify the plant

05/19/2017 2:17 PM

I hope not, as it is already too near the gate that is right beside the door to my work shed, where as like as not, I will be found (by wifey) with my nose buried deep in a prototype board, an Arduino sketch, looming over my lathe, cutting clear PVC, running wires, tubing, and goggledygook, and smoking while leaning over my lawn mower fuel bucket with gas cans in it....oh and I left out running the drill press, chop saw, and hand drill, and the soldering iron (all on a high gauge number 100' extension cord because I am too cheap to hire an electrician to come hook me up with a 30A breaker.

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 2914
Good Answers: 115
#2

Re: This week's episode of Identify the plant

05/19/2017 2:02 PM
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#5
In reply to #2

Re: This week's episode of Identify the plant

05/19/2017 2:20 PM

No. Commanche Peak is down by Leon's favorite town of Glen Rose, TX. Dinosaur Valley State Park is there on the Paluxy River, where clearly a man's fossilized footprint can be seen impressed over a large dinosaur footprint.

The man was a Texan, because clearly the dinosaur was running away from him!

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 2914
Good Answers: 115
#8
In reply to #5

Re: This week's episode of Identify the plant

05/19/2017 2:33 PM

I camped overnight at that park and saw the dino footprints. Stood in one of them. Spend the next day jet-skiing in Squaw Creek Reservoir.

Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#9
In reply to #8

Re: This week's episode of Identify the plant

05/19/2017 2:43 PM

Nice. My deceased brother-in-law really, really loved going down that way (he had family back up in the sticks there).

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
2
Guru

Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 5368
Good Answers: 521
#12
In reply to #5

Re: This week's episode of Identify the plant

05/19/2017 3:12 PM

One of my favorite cartoons... Thanks, Gary Larson!

Register to Reply Good Answer (Score 2)
Guru
Hobbies - CNC - New Member Hobbies - DIY Welding - New Member Engineering Fields - Electromechanical Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 18227
Good Answers: 319
#3

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/19/2017 2:13 PM

a better picture of the leaf would help....

so I can only guess, Asclepias Purpurascens.

Also known as Milkweed.

__________________
phoenix911
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#6
In reply to #3

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/19/2017 2:25 PM

I need to do a scratch and schniff test - I think the milkweed you are familiar with does emit a pungent odor upon injury.

It also emits a latex. Have not checked, just was told by wifey to ID this intruder before pulling out the big iron on him.

At first, I thought it was volunteer tobacco, but I have never seen that in Texas. I shudder to think if it was a baby hemlock tree and I dried the leaves and stuffed that in my pipe and lit up! Not that there are hemlock trees here, or anything else to do with Aristotle. Maybe Catalpa? We did have one we had to cut down, but not noticed any of the long seed pods in a while, and no volunteers near the stump.

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 2914
Good Answers: 115
#7
In reply to #6

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/19/2017 2:28 PM

If it's milkweed don't pull it out. Monarch caterpillars feed on them.

Register to Reply
Guru
United Kingdom - Member - Not a New Member Hobbies - Musician - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Reading, Berkshire, UK. Going under cover.
Posts: 9473
Good Answers: 447
#20
In reply to #6

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/20/2017 6:42 AM

My first thought was some kind of tobacco - but I can't resolve the picture very well (maybe my eyesight) and I'm not familiar with US flora.

__________________
"Love justice, you who rule the world" - Dante Alighieri
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: at the beach in Florida
Posts: 18275
Good Answers: 1061
#10

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/19/2017 2:48 PM

Yeah looks like Milkweed, wait for it to flower for proper ID....

__________________
Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving. A.E.
Register to Reply
Guru
Hobbies - CNC - New Member Hobbies - DIY Welding - New Member Engineering Fields - Electromechanical Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 18227
Good Answers: 319
#11
In reply to #10

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/19/2017 3:00 PM

Or, pull a leaf off... and see if it bleeds 'milk'

__________________
phoenix911
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 6330
Good Answers: 231
#13

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/19/2017 3:31 PM

Looks like Pokeweed to me.

.

If it is pokeweed, later on the stem should darken to red/purple and eventually it will make lots of poke berrries.

You can make poke salad out of Pokeweed, but it is important to take all the safety precautions to avoid poisoning yourself.

__________________
Eternal vigilance is the price of knowledge. - George Santayana
Register to Reply
Guru
Hobbies - CNC - New Member Hobbies - DIY Welding - New Member Engineering Fields - Electromechanical Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 18227
Good Answers: 319
#14
In reply to #13

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/19/2017 3:41 PM

There are parts of the Milkweed that are also edible,... but I can't remember which parts.

__________________
phoenix911
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#15
In reply to #13

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/19/2017 3:54 PM

I think I have seen pokeweed around here before, but I don't know how to prepare it if it was here. I think you have to boil the leaves in vinegar?? to remove the alkaloids.

As far as milkweed that I have seen in West Texas, it seldom reaches more than 16-18" height before it pods out. The edible part is in the wind, or it is above the top leaf tip, and below the last root.

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 6330
Good Answers: 231
#16
In reply to #15

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/19/2017 4:14 PM

Poke weed is pretty distinctive for quickly growing large leaves and robust stalk in shade. It will take off in areas that other stuff barely survives.

.

If you have young ones around or naive livestock around, do not suffer this plant to live, The berries look tempting. All parts of the plant are toxic and probably mutagenic. The juice from the berries can be absorbed through the skin with ill effects.

.

People do consume the leaves and stalks. Younger is better. It is imperative that no berries or roots are collected with leaves and stalks (better to harvest before and berries are present as toxins in stalk and leaves build up over time). The stalks and leaves should be boiled in water drained and filled with fresh water to boil again, repeated several times.

.

Supposedly pares well with hemlock wine, bear liver, amateur fugu fillets, and salmonella stuffed amanita mushroom caps.

__________________
Eternal vigilance is the price of knowledge. - George Santayana
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#17
In reply to #16

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/19/2017 4:32 PM

Sounds like a splendid final meal, if one could get past the taste of it!

I will stick with removing this offending weed, or catalpa tree volunteer before long.

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Fans of Old Computers - TRS-80 - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - Hazmat - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member United States - Member - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Detroit MI, USA
Posts: 1810
Good Answers: 188
#18
In reply to #17

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/19/2017 5:35 PM

Did you do a taste test it yet? Just eat one leaf, let us know what it tastes like, and if there are any issues after ingestion. That should surely help us narrow it down.

__________________
How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life. --CAPTAIN KIRK, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
Register to Reply
Commentator

Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Southern Illinois
Posts: 64
#25
In reply to #18

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/21/2017 9:13 PM

I have polk in my yard and eat it often. It tastes like spinach. Never gave me any problems. Wouldn't eat it raw, tho.

__________________
Science is the "cookbook" for making things.
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#29
In reply to #18

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/22/2017 9:11 AM

I am brave, but not that cavalier about my health. I ain't planning on smoking any of it either.

Big events here this week with wifey's surgery looming tomorrow. If I am back at work any time this week, I will attempt to have a better pic taken at midday, or perhaps one in more contrasty lighting with the plant being the brighter than the background items.

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
3
Guru

Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 6330
Good Answers: 231
#33
In reply to #29

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/22/2017 9:15 PM

Hope everything goes smoothly and well in her surgery. May she have a speedy recovery.

__________________
Eternal vigilance is the price of knowledge. - George Santayana
Register to Reply Good Answer (Score 3)
Guru
Hobbies - CNC - New Member Hobbies - DIY Welding - New Member Engineering Fields - Electromechanical Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 18227
Good Answers: 319
#34
In reply to #33

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/23/2017 7:20 AM

I feel the same....

__________________
phoenix911
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Electrical Engineering - Been there, done that, still doing it. Engineering Fields - Control Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Long Island NY
Posts: 12003
Good Answers: 758
#36
In reply to #34

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/23/2017 8:49 AM

Me too. Take care.

__________________
"Don't disturb my circles." translation of Archimedes last words
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Fans of Old Computers - TRS-80 - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - Hazmat - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member United States - Member - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Detroit MI, USA
Posts: 1810
Good Answers: 188
#37
In reply to #33

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/23/2017 6:14 PM

I hope your wife is ok also, tomorrow, 5/24/2017, I get the scans on the tumor on my thyroid. I pray for your wife as I pray for myself......

__________________
How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life. --CAPTAIN KIRK, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 6330
Good Answers: 231
#39
In reply to #37

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/24/2017 1:36 PM

Best of luck.

__________________
Eternal vigilance is the price of knowledge. - George Santayana
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Fans of Old Computers - TRS-80 - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - Hazmat - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member United States - Member - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Detroit MI, USA
Posts: 1810
Good Answers: 188
#42
In reply to #39

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/24/2017 3:45 PM

Thank you, truth.

Just got home from the hospital. Who would have thought something as innocuous sounding as "thyroid ultrasound" would be so damn uncomfortable. 40 minutes laying on back with head tilted as far back as possible with a plastic probe pressed into different parts of my neck and throat. I was not expecting it to suck so bad, never looked like a big deal when I was in there for my kids fetal ultrasounds.

Nuclear scan was a little better, same position, took an hour, but nothing was pressing into my throat.

They gave me a good chuckle afterwards, when they asked me if I planned on traveling this weekend via an airplane. Apparently the radioactive isotope they injected me with, can set off some airport scanners for the next 3 days.

__________________
How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life. --CAPTAIN KIRK, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 6330
Good Answers: 231
#43
In reply to #42

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/25/2017 2:49 AM

Was it Iodine? Do you know the isotope?

Curious that they would use ultrasound in conjunction with radioisotopes.

__________________
Eternal vigilance is the price of knowledge. - George Santayana
Register to Reply
Guru
United Kingdom - Member - Not a New Member Hobbies - Musician - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Reading, Berkshire, UK. Going under cover.
Posts: 9473
Good Answers: 447
#44
In reply to #43

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/25/2017 5:03 AM

For thyroid scans, it's usually Tc-99m or I-131. I did a lot of work on a CT isotope emission scanner during my early working life.

__________________
"Love justice, you who rule the world" - Dante Alighieri
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 6330
Good Answers: 231
#47
In reply to #44

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/25/2017 2:21 PM

I-131? Thought that was usually used for treatment (ablation) as the decay is sufficiently energetic to kill appreciable amounts of thyroid cells.

I think 1-123 is usually used in imaging.

The reason I was asking about the isotope is because the ultrasound in conjunction with radio iodine didn't sound right as imaging. I know they sometimes want to image the thyroid to see where effects are noticeable when treating and so was thing it was possibly related....but what a mistake if the patient thought they were imaging when it was actually treatment. Anyway, that doesn't appear to be the case.

__________________
Eternal vigilance is the price of knowledge. - George Santayana
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Fans of Old Computers - TRS-80 - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - Hazmat - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member United States - Member - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Detroit MI, USA
Posts: 1810
Good Answers: 188
#48
In reply to #47

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/25/2017 4:30 PM

It was Tc-99m, I confirmed on follow my health.com. The radioisotope was injected after the ultrasound procedure, so I was not emitting any gamma radiation during ultrasound. Both scans were purely diagnostic.

They said it should all be out of my system by tomorrow. I tried real hard to nuke hot dogs for my kids yesterday with my bare hands, it didn't work.

You are right though, if it is what he thinks it is, (Graves), it's benign and auto-immune and he said he would kill my thyroid with radioiodine (I-131, I believe).

__________________
How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life. --CAPTAIN KIRK, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
Register to Reply
Guru
United Kingdom - Member - Not a New Member Hobbies - Musician - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Reading, Berkshire, UK. Going under cover.
Posts: 9473
Good Answers: 447
#49
In reply to #47

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/26/2017 7:24 AM

Could've been my memory playing up. Pretty sure we scanned some I-131 - loaded objects, but they may've been perspex phantoms (during testing) rather than patients.

__________________
"Love justice, you who rule the world" - Dante Alighieri
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 6330
Good Answers: 231
#50
In reply to #49

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/27/2017 3:48 PM

Your memory is probably correct. There are probably other I-131 medical imaging uses of which I am unaware, and it may have been used more widely in the past.

__________________
Eternal vigilance is the price of knowledge. - George Santayana
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Fans of Old Computers - TRS-80 - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - Hazmat - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member United States - Member - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Detroit MI, USA
Posts: 1810
Good Answers: 188
#45
In reply to #43

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/25/2017 5:19 AM

2 separate scans. Ultrasound was first, then upstairs for the nuclear scan. Web MD has a pretty accurate description here.

I am not sure exactly the isotope, I think it was Tc-99m, it was on the order which they kept, I know it was pretty low in radioactivity though.

I did read up on this on Web MD before hand because the nuclear scan kind of worried me, turned out it was no big deal and the ultrasound was the uncomfortable one.

__________________
How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life. --CAPTAIN KIRK, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
Register to Reply
Guru
United Kingdom - Member - Not a New Member Hobbies - Musician - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Reading, Berkshire, UK. Going under cover.
Posts: 9473
Good Answers: 447
#46
In reply to #45

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/25/2017 5:43 AM

I fully sympathize on the neck ultrasound scan. I had a "mini-stroke" (TIA) a few years back, and of all the scans and whatever the only painful one was an ultrasound scan to check the condition of my carotid arteries. Unfortunately, the only person available to start it was very inexperienced, and it took ages and hurt like hell. When his senior came to check, she got a result in a few seconds, with no discomfort at all.

__________________
"Love justice, you who rule the world" - Dante Alighieri
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Fans of Old Computers - TRS-80 - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - Hazmat - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member United States - Member - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Detroit MI, USA
Posts: 1810
Good Answers: 188
#41
In reply to #29

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/24/2017 3:14 PM

How is your wife doing?

__________________
How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life. --CAPTAIN KIRK, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#52
In reply to #41

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

06/05/2017 11:10 AM

Today is my first day back at work. I spent all week last week attending to her after dismissal from hospital. We are still working on after effects of all the antibiotics she had to take. Two words: Diflucan, probiotics.

I don't think the one dose of Diflucan was sufficient, and now we are stuck using over the counter remedies for yeast infection. Probiotic (active culture foods) appear to be at least as effective as many other medications.

To be honest, after having her in hospital for a full week, I was blanched of energy, and needed to recuperate as well. I did wait upon her hand and foot, and pretended to be the skullery maid, and house wench for the entire time.

A big thank you to all who uttered prayers for my wife (and me). It does appear that God is especially fond of her, since her recovery went as well as could be expected. I had her up and walking "a lap" around the nurse's station within 2.5 hours of surgical endpoint. The surgery took a lot less time than expected, and the incisions were quite small indeed.

JPool: I hope all is well with you at this time. Best wishes!

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 330
Good Answers: 2
#35
In reply to #13

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/23/2017 8:41 AM

I once saw a single huge pokeweed growing on a small pile of oyster shells just barely above normal high tide in a Florida tidal estuary. Nothing else was growing on the oyster shells; it survived for a month or two until being blasted by several above normal high tides and serious wind.

Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Placerville, CA (38° 45N, 120° 47'W)
Posts: 4399
Good Answers: 158
#19

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/19/2017 11:27 PM

The leaf shape and leaf structure look like a Southern Magnolia, but your plant grew way too fast to be a SM seedling. I've had a number of Southern Magnolia seedlings come up (children of a tree I planted 45 or more years ago), and they take a year to reach six inches...(High)

__________________
Teaching is a great experience, but there is no better teacher than experience.
Register to Reply
Commentator

Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Southern Illinois
Posts: 64
#21

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/20/2017 8:46 AM

Hard to be sure, but it kind of like a holly tree (they come in both tree and bush).

__________________
Science is the "cookbook" for making things.
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Hemet, Land of milk and honey.
Posts: 1022
Good Answers: 20
#22

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/20/2017 6:37 PM

I was wondering about the ladder,,if your not going to use it,,can I borrow it ?

Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#30
In reply to #22

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/22/2017 9:13 AM

Yes, you can borrow, if you bring it back by next pruning season, because it is just catching dust hanging on the back fence, at least that is in the shade. I can't guarantee the ladder to be safe above my weight.

Kind of a long commute just for a ladder, though, and I surprised no one mentioned my converted cat litter containers that are storing rain water (for LENR experiments).

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Hemet, Land of milk and honey.
Posts: 1022
Good Answers: 20
#38
In reply to #30

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/23/2017 9:56 PM

As for the LENR experiments, in the jurisdiction where you live is there a city code governing such ?

or is a not on the books thing and they best leave it up to the person to judge safety protocol's ?

Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 6330
Good Answers: 231
#40
In reply to #38

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/24/2017 2:08 PM

I doubt city code would typically be the overriding most restrictive requirement. As nuclear materials and reactions are not generally viewed as straight forward enough for lay analysis and governance, if any mention is made of "nuclear' in city code, it probably defers to NRC definitions. ( I could be wrong, and would like to see examples, if, I am)

.

As for NRC regulations, as long as any concentrated natural or synthetic sources are used according to their explicit official use as described at transfer/purchase, then whatever exemption or licensing applies will still apply. As far as novel nuclear reactions, I don't know that the NRC , is a believer in LENS. I'm no lawyer, but I suspect until such time as a significant continuous or large repeatable neutron Flux is being generated, or other radiation that poses a significant hazard, regulation for processes involving only nonregulated material and regulated material used only as described by applicable exemption or license, then the NRC won't raise an eyebrow.

Start producing large fluxes or high activity materials in appreciable amounts and things will likely change rapidly.

__________________
Eternal vigilance is the price of knowledge. - George Santayana
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#51
In reply to #38

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

06/05/2017 11:03 AM

We don't do it in the city, but at a remote facility, undisclosed location, Area 99 sort of thing. The only personnel allowed to see it do not understand how to make it work yet, so there is no immediate danger....LOL.

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Hemet, Land of milk and honey.
Posts: 1022
Good Answers: 20
#53
In reply to #51

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

06/05/2017 12:29 PM

This sort of sounds like a place where I once delivered a load of undisclosed material to a site just north of Las Vegas, NV. In that instance I drove a truck while escorted across the country by two white vans filled with m-16 toting military guards, one leading, one following. I was directed to drive upon a roadway that was camouflaged in such a way that I thought I was driving over rocks, sagebrush and sand. I arrived at an " agricultural station ", similar to the one in the movie, " Andromeda Strain " , there I was met by a 7'2" African American Sgt. He asked for the keys to the truck and the accompanying paperwork, ( initially I was reluctant to hand him the keys and paperwork as per company policy where the driver was required to be present at off loading of any delivery) as the Sgt reached for his hip mounted 45 caliber pistol, I hurriedly handed him the keys and paperwork. My co-driver and I were directed to a tan colored windowless building to await his return.

The interesting thing about the inside of the building was the single large one way glass partition, the solitary military gray steel desk with two chairs facing each other, the cola and candy vending machines and the open lavatory, there were no other furnishings or decorations of any kind.

I never saw any other personel at the site, with the exception of the Sgt. , all orders and commands were given over loudspeaker.

When the truck was returned several hours later, I was then escorted off, " base " by 3 small 2 person helicopters ( similar to the one in the image)

Is your, " area 99", like this ?

Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#54
In reply to #53

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

06/05/2017 1:25 PM

No, it has an even lower profile. LOL

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 680
Good Answers: 21
#23

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/21/2017 6:52 PM

It could be a rubber tree.... they are often used as indoor potted ornamentals, but become a BIG tree in the ground!

take a leaf to your local nursery.

Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Fans of Old Computers - TRS-80 - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - Hazmat - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member United States - Member - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Detroit MI, USA
Posts: 1810
Good Answers: 188
#24

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/21/2017 7:12 PM

The more I look at it, the more it looks like a milkweed.

__________________
How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life. --CAPTAIN KIRK, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 6330
Good Answers: 231
#26
In reply to #24

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/21/2017 9:22 PM

It isn't milkweed. Milkweed leaves are arranged opposite on the stem, not alternating. It is pokeweed.

__________________
Eternal vigilance is the price of knowledge. - George Santayana
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Fans of Old Computers - TRS-80 - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - Hazmat - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member United States - Member - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Detroit MI, USA
Posts: 1810
Good Answers: 188
#27
In reply to #26

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/22/2017 5:34 AM

You are right about the leaves on a milk weed and I am unfamiliar with the poke weed, but pics I have seen online show purple stems. Are there some with green or purple?

It almost looks like a tobacco plant. We need a better picture of it.

__________________
How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life. --CAPTAIN KIRK, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
Register to Reply
Commentator

Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Southern Illinois
Posts: 64
#28
In reply to #27

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/22/2017 8:33 AM

The stems of poke start out out green and turn purple as it gets older.

It stays green for quite awhile.

__________________
Science is the "cookbook" for making things.
Register to Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 330
Good Answers: 2
#31

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/22/2017 10:14 AM

Sort of looks like okra, but you would have buds by now and you are not likely to have a volunteer unless someone nearby was growing it through a lifecycle.

Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#32
In reply to #31

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

05/22/2017 10:59 AM

While I found the write-up in Wikipedia to be interesting, and I was surprised to learn that in some parts of the world, the leaves are used as cooked greens, this is clearly not okra, but if it fools me, I will let you know when the first pods are in my kitchen being rolled on corn meal. Love me some fried okra, along with whatever kind of meat is available in the house, including SPAM.

I like to use okra along with other vegetables in soup making, and no matter how it comes out, the correct term for it is gumbo (even if it bears no resemblance to New Orleans gumbo).

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
Associate

Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 31
Good Answers: 3
#55
In reply to #32

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/05/2017 6:05 PM

Jim,

I live south of you a few miles, and just got around to looking at the old postings. As a survivor of the cotton patch, having spent many years learning the value of the "short rows", have you thought that is most likely what we called "Devil's Claw"? They look a lot like okra, but the pods turn into nasty six inch long curved thorns that look very much like what the name says.

__________________
Real men don't set for stun!
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#56
In reply to #55

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/06/2017 10:09 AM

No, sorry, it is now, I grew up around that plant, and know it well.

The leaves of devil claw have lot longer trichomes that make the leaves fuzzy, as I recall.

This plant has smooth leaves as does tobacco, but it has now bloomed with very small white clusters of flowers spaced as much as 1/2" apart within the clusters.

The leaves do not appear to be as large as I would expect tobacco (still have not ruled out), but neither do they now resemble the Catalpa blooms or leaves. It does not identify as poke weed either. Leaving it growing for now, pending further investigation.

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Electrical Engineering - Been there, done that, still doing it. Engineering Fields - Control Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Long Island NY
Posts: 12003
Good Answers: 758
#57
In reply to #56

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/06/2017 10:21 AM

Please post a picture of the flowers. The flower color, shape and size are sometimes the only way one can differentiate between similar species.

__________________
"Don't disturb my circles." translation of Archimedes last words
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#58
In reply to #57

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/06/2017 10:28 AM

That may have to wait until Monday. I thought I had one in gallery, but not. I am off duty tomorrow, got domestic duties wife cannot pick up still,

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 6330
Good Answers: 231
#59
In reply to #56

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/06/2017 11:08 AM

So what trait of your plant is ruling out pokeweed?

__________________
Eternal vigilance is the price of knowledge. - George Santayana
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#60
In reply to #59

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/06/2017 2:15 PM

Leaf appearance, lack of the crimson colored stems around the dark berries (of which there are no berries (yet)). I see pictures of poke weed leaves and the leaves appear to have an irregular (up and down) topography across a leaf, where my plant has leaves that are as smooth as a tobacco leaf.

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 6330
Good Answers: 231
#61
In reply to #60

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/06/2017 2:25 PM

Tobacco leaf:

Pokeweed :

__________________
Eternal vigilance is the price of knowledge. - George Santayana
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#62
In reply to #61

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/06/2017 2:33 PM

Better pics than I had, it does resemble poke weed now. I need to shoot some more shots, get back with you all, and then stop arguing.

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 680
Good Answers: 21
#63
In reply to #62

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/06/2017 6:46 PM

Could you take a leaf and flowers to your local plant nursery?

Register to Reply Score 1 for Good Answer
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#64

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/10/2017 8:58 AM

Here are some updated pictures of latter growth with white-colored flowers.

These photos of mine definitely are not consistent with tobacco, and now I see the structure resemble pokeweed, as shown below. Stem color has not reddened as yet. Now, it appears the leaf structure of pokeweed is not as smooth as the leaves on my plant. Even more confusion.

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 6330
Good Answers: 231
#65
In reply to #64

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/11/2017 12:19 AM

That is pokeweed.

The stems don't typically turn purple until the fruit is ripe. It might be a signal to birds that the fruit is ripe, or it might just be using certain nutrients (magnesium?) faster than it can procure more.

There apparently is significant variation in the smoothness of the leaves.

__________________
Eternal vigilance is the price of knowledge. - George Santayana
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#66
In reply to #65

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/11/2017 9:02 AM

Then I will don my gloves and uproot this plant before it takes over my annex storage area.

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Fans of Old Computers - TRS-80 - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - Hazmat - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member United States - Member - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Detroit MI, USA
Posts: 1810
Good Answers: 188
#67
In reply to #66

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/11/2017 2:11 PM

Yes, pull it out before it takes over like these damn Tiger Lilies my ex wife left in my front yard. I dig out all the bulbs I can find, mow em down, weed wack them, even sprayed round up on the ones growing between my patio stones.

I can't get rid of them, my yard looks like some of the old pictures of the WWI trenches. Craters, mounds, destruction every where.

I level it out, put grass seed down, water it. The damn lilies come back up before I can get the grass seed to germinate.

__________________
How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life. --CAPTAIN KIRK, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#68
In reply to #67

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/11/2017 2:19 PM

give 'em cancer. I understand RoundUp is pretty good at doing that.

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Fans of Old Computers - TRS-80 - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - Hazmat - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member United States - Member - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Detroit MI, USA
Posts: 1810
Good Answers: 188
#69
In reply to #68

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/11/2017 2:37 PM

I already used Round Up on the ones growing in the patio stones. They wither and come back after a week or so. Hardy bastards.....

__________________
How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life. --CAPTAIN KIRK, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#70
In reply to #69

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/11/2017 4:40 PM

We need to find out what these things are made of, and transplant that trait into row crops? Might be our worst nighthorse?

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Placerville, CA (38° 45N, 120° 47'W)
Posts: 4399
Good Answers: 158
#72
In reply to #67

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/12/2017 1:36 AM

Wow! I'd love to have that problem! I brought some native ones home quite a few years ago. I accidentally broke the stem of the last remaining one last year, and now have none.

__________________
Teaching is a great experience, but there is no better teacher than experience.
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#73
In reply to #72

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/12/2017 9:43 AM

JPool may yet benefit from this emerging market for Tiger Lillies!

I think if we exported those to the Middle East, the deserts would soon be covered in them, heck, even in the Sahara Desert.

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Fans of Old Computers - TRS-80 - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - Hazmat - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member United States - Member - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Detroit MI, USA
Posts: 1810
Good Answers: 188
#74
In reply to #72

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/12/2017 11:29 AM

They are weeds and spread like them. They have gone from where they were planted steadily over the years to about 12 feet away in my lawn. Those in the lawn get mowed every week and I use weed and feed twice a year. Obviously those don't bloom because I mow them down but the damn things grow 3 times as fast as the grass.

I wish I had dkwarners problem. Maybe you should send me self addressed prepaid postage box and I send you some bulbs, or roots or whatever keeps them coming up, free!!!

__________________
How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life. --CAPTAIN KIRK, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Fans of Old Computers - TRS-80 - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - Hazmat - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member United States - Member - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Detroit MI, USA
Posts: 1810
Good Answers: 188
#76
In reply to #72

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/12/2017 11:59 AM

It would seem that the ones here are a different species then the ones in CA. Ours are Lilium superbum and I believe yours are Lilium columbianum .

You see ours growing wild all over mostly in ditches on the sides of the road. That is where mine came from.

__________________
How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life. --CAPTAIN KIRK, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Placerville, CA (38° 45N, 120° 47'W)
Posts: 4399
Good Answers: 158
#77
In reply to #76

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/12/2017 1:51 PM

I think you are correct. I'm at the southern edge of the native region for these plants at my altitude (2100 ft.). There is a fairly large patch of these on a friend's property about a mile from my home, but they are under large pines and on a north-facing slope. My home is on a south-west slope, and of course I want them in a place where I can see them. I do have lots of trees, but most of the shaded areas aren't where I can see them from the house...

I thought about taking you up on your offer, but I rather suspect that your lilies wouldn't like our hot dry summers. Thanks anyway!

__________________
Teaching is a great experience, but there is no better teacher than experience.
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Fans of Old Computers - TRS-80 - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - Hazmat - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member United States - Member - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Detroit MI, USA
Posts: 1810
Good Answers: 188
#79
In reply to #77

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/12/2017 4:39 PM

They are pretty damn hardy, we have our dry times also, my grass turns brown but the lilies seem to do ok. I don't water my yard so they get what ever water nature gives them.

The following picture is a group in front of my shed, I have left these alone. They are about out of bloom for the season :

These are ones in my lawn that get mowed and weed wacked every week for the last 10 years, you can see how much faster they grow than the grass :

This picture are the ones I have actively tried to destroy, dug up, raked over, planted grass seed. As you can see, they are the first things to grow back :

I think they are pretty hardy. I suspect the best time to ship them across the country would be in the fall, when its a little cooler. We are in the 90's now, can't imagine they would like being dug up sitting in a hot truck for a couple days.

If you decide you want some, I will dig the ones up that I have not tried to kill and see if I can find a taproot and some bulbs. Just P.M. me, we'll set something up, I think it should be in the fall. The only thing I want in return is to know if they survived the cross country transplant.

__________________
How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life. --CAPTAIN KIRK, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Placerville, CA (38° 45N, 120° 47'W)
Posts: 4399
Good Answers: 158
#81
In reply to #79

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/13/2017 1:21 AM

Ah! Now I understand...I don't know what you call them back there, but your photos do NOT show either variety of Tiger lily, they show what I know as Daylilies: Hemerocallis

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daylily

True lilies grow from a scaly bulb, and all the leaves grow out from a single tall stem. The flowers are commonly pendant (face downward) as is the one in your first link, or face outward (like Easter Lilies). Daylilies grow from a mass of fibrous roots, often with tubers, and there are no leaves on the flower stem; the flowers usually face upwards, as in your photos

The root system of daylilies :http://stumpjack.squarespace.com/stumpjack/2012/4/6/the-beautiful-invasive-edible-daylily.html

I was not aware that they are edible; I'll have to dig some up and try them. Yes, they are invasive here too. There was a small patch of them about 2 feet in diameter when I moved to this house in 1970, planted in the worst possible soil on a steep west-facing hillside. They now have spread ten or fifteen feet, in spite of moving quite a few of them off the property. At least the gophers don't seem to bother them, so they do hold the (now much improved) soil on that steep bank.

I've got plenty, in four different colors, so don't bother sending any!

__________________
Teaching is a great experience, but there is no better teacher than experience.
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Fans of Old Computers - TRS-80 - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - Hazmat - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member United States - Member - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Detroit MI, USA
Posts: 1810
Good Answers: 188
#83
In reply to #81

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/13/2017 6:51 AM

You peeked my curiosity. Not sure they are day lilies though. They do have a long stalk with the leaves at the base. The flowers often do hang down. The flowers last at least a week if not longer, and I have never seen the green pod mentioned on your link. Although they got beat up in a storm last night here are a couple pictures with better angles :

I dug up a couple of those tuber root things and found one with the greenery still on it, the are a type of iris. There has been so many things planted where the lilies were that I can't get rid of that I am unsure of what is at the bottom of them, Hostas, Asiatic lilies, Daffodils, Iris, multiple varieties of Tulips. My neighbor took most of them. I will dig up an untouched group of the lilies by the shed a see if there are bulbs or not.

Here is a pic of the iris roots :

__________________
How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life. --CAPTAIN KIRK, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Placerville, CA (38° 45N, 120° 47'W)
Posts: 4399
Good Answers: 158
#85
In reply to #83

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/13/2017 11:40 AM

Obviously, you piqued my interest as well!

I'm virtually certain that those photos in post #79 are indeed daylilies. We just pulled the mostly dry leaves off of our single daylilies (the original and most invasive ones) a couple of days ago, as they had finished blooming. The double ones still have a few blooms. Here is a plant with one bloom, with iris leaves visible in the foreground and background:

Here is a closeup of the flower (again with the greyer iris leaves in the foreground:

You can see that the petals are essentially identical to those of the first picture in post #79.

Here is the root structure:

The white tubers are the ones forming this year; the brown ones are from previous years.

It seems quite possible that the blooms will last much longer with the higher humidity where you live. Here, our afternoon humidity has be in the low teens recently, and the flowers are usually pretty well wilted on the second day after opening. If you happen to have any interest, you can see the weather at my home: KCAPLACE21.

I hadn't thought about it before, but I don't ever remember seeing a seedpod either. They don't need seeds! besides the roots spreading, the gophers carry bits of tubers through their tunnels, so new ones come up in widely separated areas.

Your last photo is indeed an iris. That root structure is referred to as a rhizome.

__________________
Teaching is a great experience, but there is no better teacher than experience.
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Fans of Old Computers - TRS-80 - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - Hazmat - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member United States - Member - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Detroit MI, USA
Posts: 1810
Good Answers: 188
#86
In reply to #85

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/13/2017 7:38 PM

My flowers don't have the mass in the middle of them. The only way we will know is when I dig some up that I have not messed with. Today after work it was 85 degrees with 85% humidity. Digging up flowers is the last thing on my mind, I will dig a group up this weekend and post pictures, they are either true lilies or day lilies, the roots/bulbs will tell. I will post pictures.

Sorry, James... Your "This weeks Episode of Identify the plant" has become this month's, cross country episode.

__________________
How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life. --CAPTAIN KIRK, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#95
In reply to #86

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/14/2017 9:03 AM

I am still enjoying the thread.

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Fans of Old Computers - TRS-80 - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - Hazmat - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member United States - Member - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Detroit MI, USA
Posts: 1810
Good Answers: 188
#87
In reply to #85

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/13/2017 7:59 PM

Ok, it was bugging me too much. I just dug one of the unmolested one's up. Although it doesn't look like your tubers/roots, it's not bulbs. Wouldn't think you would have 7 bulbs for one plant. So I am now convinced it is some type of day lily, even if flowers last a week or more.

Here are the pics :

__________________
How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life. --CAPTAIN KIRK, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Placerville, CA (38° 45N, 120° 47'W)
Posts: 4399
Good Answers: 158
#88
In reply to #87

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/13/2017 8:13 PM

Very good! No question; those are daylilies. If your tubers look different than mine, I'm willing to bet it's due to the different climates... You've got more water, so the tubers get larger.

Thanks!

__________________
Teaching is a great experience, but there is no better teacher than experience.
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Fans of Old Computers - TRS-80 - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - Hazmat - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member United States - Member - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Detroit MI, USA
Posts: 1810
Good Answers: 188
#90
In reply to #88

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/13/2017 8:33 PM

They are really not that big, the pic is against a 2 x 4... probably a different species of daylily. Tubers are not much bigger the a single knuckle of my fingers. But yes it's some type of daylily, now I need to figure out how to get rid of all of them.

They are Hemerocallis fulva var. fulva, he best I can tell.

__________________
How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life. --CAPTAIN KIRK, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Placerville, CA (38° 45N, 120° 47'W)
Posts: 4399
Good Answers: 158
#91
In reply to #90

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/13/2017 9:08 PM

I didn't have anything in my photos to show size. The picture of the roots/tubers shows an area about 5" across, so they are close to the same size as yours.

Hemerocallis fulva does look right. I think the only way to possibly get rid of them would be to dig the entire area about 6" deep and sift the soil through a 3/8" or finer mesh. Even that would probably miss a few roots/tubers with whatever is required to propagate.

I refuse to use Roundup or similar chemicals, except perhaps in tiny amounts on cracks in pavement. We are poisoning the Earth Way too much!

__________________
Teaching is a great experience, but there is no better teacher than experience.
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 680
Good Answers: 21
#92
In reply to #91

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/13/2017 9:31 PM

Have you tried boiling water? Iron Sulphate (fertiliser), salt, chillies, etc, see below

Have a look at:

'http://www.organic-veggie-patch.com/organic-weed-control.html

http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/stories/s1366394.htm

Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Electrical Engineering - Been there, done that, still doing it. Engineering Fields - Control Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Long Island NY
Posts: 12003
Good Answers: 758
#93
In reply to #88

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/13/2017 10:00 PM

Why do people insist that it has to be identical to a textbook or schematic diagram to be a match.

Oops sorry. I forgot that this was an engineering forum.

Did anybody notice that a large iceberg was formed in Antarctica during their "winter" season?

Oops sorry again. This thread is about the appearance of an invasive plant species, never mind.

__________________
"Don't disturb my circles." translation of Archimedes last words
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#97
In reply to #93

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/14/2017 9:10 AM

How I do yearn for the days when biology was almost considered as much an art as science. Plant taxonomy is a very wide field indeed. We have yet to mar the surface (in this forum).

The People's Biology is now in session.

As to the iceberg in Antarctica, do you mean to say a large one "calved" in winter? That is not good.

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
Engineering Fields - Electrical Engineering - Been there, done that, still doing it. Engineering Fields - Control Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Long Island NY
Posts: 12003
Good Answers: 758
#98
In reply to #97

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/14/2017 9:14 AM

Yep, an iceberg the size of Delaware.

__________________
"Don't disturb my circles." translation of Archimedes last words
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#99
In reply to #98

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/14/2017 11:09 AM

Somebody needs to lasso that thing and cart to the Persian Arabian Gulf! Persia does not exist, it is Iran, and they should have their water cut off for being bad boys.

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#84
In reply to #79

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/13/2017 9:06 AM

Here in Texas there is an invasive vine we call "Virginia Creeper". Definitely not Tiger Lily, but also grows like mad. Not an ugly plant, but is very hard to contain within its own limited area. I would never plant this thing on purpose.

Virginia Creeper showing maturity with blue berries on red stems.

Trumpet Vine showing blooms of orange flowers, this one also is invasive, and grows rapidly, and gets out of control easily.

We also used to refer to the Trumpet Vine loosely as "Bugle Bush".

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Fans of Old Computers - TRS-80 - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - Hazmat - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member United States - Member - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Detroit MI, USA
Posts: 1810
Good Answers: 188
#89
In reply to #84

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/13/2017 8:28 PM

We have trumpet vines here...

__________________
How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life. --CAPTAIN KIRK, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 6330
Good Answers: 231
#94
In reply to #84

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/14/2017 6:42 AM

'Invasive' typically implies non-native (are you 'invading' the place from which you come?), though I do understand how virginia creeper and trumpet vine can invade a yard.

Virginia creeper is a solid competitor to poison ivy. "Leaves in five, let it throve; leaves in three, let it be."

__________________
Eternal vigilance is the price of knowledge. - George Santayana
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#96
In reply to #94

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/14/2017 9:06 AM

Neither of the plants and the mysterious plant of the week, are native to my area of West Texas, as I was pretty familiar with what grew and did not grow in the wild here as a child.

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 6330
Good Answers: 231
#100
In reply to #96

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/14/2017 1:27 PM

I stand corrected. Indeed the native area is only the eastern part of Texas for both species.

__________________
Eternal vigilance is the price of knowledge. - George Santayana
Register to Reply
Associate

Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 31
Good Answers: 3
#101
In reply to #96

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/15/2017 7:24 PM

OK, I've been trying all week to get in touch with a very good friend who actually eats poke on a semi-regular basis, to be sure I have this correct. He lives very near Lubbock, but as a child, he spent all his summers, at least a big portion of them on a ranch, a bit further east, just off the Pease River, 75 miles driving distance from Lubbock, probably less than 60 as the sandhill crane flies.....

Anyway, I do know that his ranch there has quite a few "mots" (Shin Oak Thickets) with Poke growing wild in them, and it was that way at least 100 years, from the stories I personally heard from his long since departed family members, so I'm pretty sure it is native just off the Caprock of Texas. Seeds could very well be transported in the poop of birds passing through.

Just last week he prepared poke for his family members who no longer live nearby (many of the "young 'uns" live on the left coast and are amazed that people are allowed to eat things that grow wild, or for that matter, eat anything that didn't come from a market).

He picks the younger, more tender leaves, and washes them thoroughly in cold water (I guess, preferably the incredibly hard water from his well, just guessing) to remove the various insects, bird poop, and sand that always come with a big bowl of poke, and then proceeds to put them in a pot of cold water, not hot, and slowly brings it to a very slight boil, not a rolling boil, and then pours off all the water. He repeats this three times, starting with cold water and bringing it to a slow boil each time. He says simply boiling it makes poke a gooey mess, and it must be repeated to get the alkali out of the leaves. He tastes it, and if it does not make his tongue "bloom" (sort of like the feeling of licking a 9v battery) it is ready to eat.

I have eaten it, in times past, with him, and have to report it is an interesting green, but I am inclined to irritable bowel, and it was quite "stimulating", so I don't often eat it unless I am ready to stay close to the plumbing niceties (which his old ranch house lacked). As I recall, it is one of those southern delicacies that is often served with various bacon grease prepared sides, etc.

__________________
Real men don't set for stun!
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 6330
Good Answers: 231
#102
In reply to #101

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/16/2017 7:24 AM

I was refering to virginia creeper and trumpet vine. Pokeweed is native to most states including Texas and New Mexico, but it might be rare in certain parts. Here is a map of where pokeweed has been reported....(the map obvioisly probably doesn't account for all pokeweed, not even all observed pokeweed):

__________________
Eternal vigilance is the price of knowledge. - George Santayana
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lubbock, Texas
Posts: 11499
Good Answers: 136
#103
In reply to #101

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/17/2017 9:40 AM

That makes sense, three time light boil to remove alkaloids. And check for "bitters" when tasting.

Around our house, we do the same for red beans (not the tasting part), and decanting of the first boiled waters removes the infamous pentose sugars that render digestion of the beans "gassy". One small can tomato sauce is added, along with ham chunks, hocks, or fatback, or salt pork, depending on what have you. A pork chop would also work.

In the meantime, I removed the "pokeweed" plant just to get it out of the way, now I will be sorry when the SHTF event starves us out.

__________________
If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just build a better one.
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 6330
Good Answers: 231
#71
In reply to #66

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/12/2017 1:07 AM

You should find a large white taproot...

__________________
Eternal vigilance is the price of knowledge. - George Santayana
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Fans of Old Computers - TRS-80 - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - Hazmat - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member United States - Member - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Detroit MI, USA
Posts: 1810
Good Answers: 188
#75
In reply to #71

Re: This Week's Episode of Identify the Plant

07/12/2017 11:43 AM

I have dug a couple up that looked like that, wasn't sure what that was..... So that is how they are spreading so far from original planting. Wikipedia says they are edible and were an important food source for native Americans. Maybe I can eat them out of existence.

__________________
How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life. --CAPTAIN KIRK, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
Register to Reply
Register to Reply Page 1 of 2: « First 1 2 Next > Last »
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Comments rated to be Good Answers:

These comments received enough positive ratings to make them "good answers".

Comments rated to be "almost" Good Answers:

Check out these comments that don't yet have enough votes to be "official" good answers and, if you agree with them, rate them!
Copy to Clipboard

Users who posted comments:

Andrew Westman (3); bullardrr (2); Dennis R. Levesque (3); dkwarner (8); huntman10 (2); James Stewart (28); JohnDG (4); JPool (20); phoenix911 (4); redfred (5); Rixter (1); SolarEagle (1); tonyhemet (3); truth is not a compromise (16); WAWAUS (3)

Previous in Forum: The Chemistry of Gold - Blog Flashback!   Next in Forum: Units Converters

Advertisement