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Osprey

08/09/2017 9:13 PM

I saw on NHK that Japanese officials have asked the u.s. military not to fly the osprey. Is this because it uses prop's rather than turbofans ?

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Guru

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#1

Re: Osprey

08/09/2017 9:53 PM

No, it's because they have a history of falling out of the sky.

Japan asks U . S . to refrain from flying Ospreys in Japan - Japan Today

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#3
In reply to #1

Re: Osprey

08/10/2017 3:07 AM

Plain and simple! GA from me Lyn

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Guru

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#2

Re: Osprey

08/09/2017 9:53 PM

No it's got safety concerns, the MV-22 Osprey has a bad record it has crashed so many times....

..."The MV-22 — a hybrid helicopter-turboprop with a checkered safety record — has two engines positioned on fixed wingtips that allow it to land and take off vertically. It can travel much faster than a helicopter.

According to the U.S. official, the Osprey crashed after clipping the back of the USS Green Bay while trying to land on the amphibious transport ship.

The aircraft which crashed was in Australia as part of a joint military exercise called Talisman Saber, which has just ended in Queensland.

The U.S. Naval Safety Center has categorized the crash as “Class A,” the most serious type which causes total property damage worth $2 million or more, aircraft destruction and fatality or permanent total disability.

There have been a series of deadly incidents, mostly in the United States, involving the aircraft.

In April 2000, 19 marines were killed in an MV-22 crash in Arizona.

Marines say the problems that plagued the aircraft while it was being developed have been fixed, and it is now actually one of the safest in the fleet.

Okinawa residents have protested the deployment of Ospreys to Futenma, which is situated in the middle of a densely crowded city.

In December, a crash-landing of an Osprey just off the Okinawan coast during a training flight sparked local anger. The aircraft broke into pieces but no one was killed."...

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2017/08/08/national/politics-diplomacy/head-u-s-forces-okinawa-sees-no-need-halt-osprey-flights-marines-weigh-grounding-fleet/#.WYu7FlGGOUk

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#16
In reply to #2

Re: Osprey

08/11/2017 12:47 PM

Being in the military, no one should go in thinking that its safe. Even the training exercises are life threatening.

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#4

Re: Osprey

08/10/2017 7:30 AM

I saw a V-22 fly overhead at dusk once. Well, first I heard it, then I went outside to what it was. The sound was thrilling, like hearing a thundering herd of helicopters.

The rotor tips were lit, so the aircraft was suspended between two large circles of light. There were other lights on too. The effect was amazing, seeing this strange looking aircraft zooming along pounding the air like a jackhammer made of cotton.

I know the plane had a lot of problems 15 or 20 years ago in early development - cost overruns, software issues, mechanical problems - but I've heard that sorry history is now mostly in the past, and the plane is performing well.

I gotta say - it looks awesome.

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Guru

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#5
In reply to #4

Re: Osprey

08/10/2017 7:57 AM
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#7
In reply to #5

Re: Osprey

08/10/2017 10:02 AM

Interesting article but I think they missed one key aspect. I suspect that most of the light produced is by the triboelectric effect of the quartz in the sand and not blade material ablation like the sparks made by a grinding wheel on a knife.

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#15
In reply to #7

Re: Osprey

08/11/2017 12:45 PM

Judge the land scape in the background, yes you're correct,... and its very hard on the rotors.

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#9
In reply to #5

Re: Osprey

08/10/2017 12:58 PM

Um, no. For one thing, where I live it is very humid, and static electricity generating light like that is extremely unlikely. For another, the light was very sharply defined. It looked very much like this photo, except the V-22 was in forward flight with the rotors tipped facing ahead, not up.

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#10
In reply to #9

Re: Osprey

08/10/2017 1:48 PM

Hey, you're right...

"The tips of each blade on the Osprey are equipped with two small position lights that give flight crew reference during formation flights and ground operators a visual safety queue of the two massive spinning rotor discs. The two LED lights are designed to work with NVG (Night Vision Goggles) and the brightness can be adjusted by the pilots. The dual LEDs can be independently adjusted for different intensity above and below the rotor disc. They also make a great show for night time spectators."

http://foxtrotalpha.jalopnik.com/night-vision-goggles-highlight-ospreys-massive-glowing-1702362031

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#11
In reply to #10

Re: Osprey

08/10/2017 10:59 PM

Cool link btw.

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#6

Re: Osprey

08/10/2017 8:28 AM

As I understand, the toughest part of flying the Osprey is the transition from hover to forward, wing supported flight and back again. It's a procedure that requires a lot of practice and relies heavily on pilot experience. It's also why accidents tend to happen on approach to landing or during landing as that's when the transition normally happens.

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#8

Re: Osprey

08/10/2017 12:02 PM

For years almost daily ospreys 2 or more at a time. Have come off the river and changed over from hover to props forward. In the valley in which my sister lives. As they then climb above the mountain tops. And returned the same way. It's over 60 miles to the nearest base that these ospreys could have taken off from to my sisters house. Training flights? There has never been an failure that I know of.

As with any machinery operation when you get comforable with them. You then make mistakes.

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#12

Re: Osprey

08/10/2017 11:12 PM

The problem with the Osprey is that while utility-wise, it's the best of both worlds between airplanes and helicopters, but as far as safety / plan-B goes, it's the worst of both worlds.

If the engines quit, an airplane can glide to a landing, and a helicopter can autorotate.

The Osprey's wings are too small for gliding, and its props/rotors are too small for autorotation, so if both engines quit, you are sitting in a falling brick.

There's a cross-drive system, so each engine alone can drive both rotors, but if both engines quit, you are done.

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Associate

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#13
In reply to #12

Re: Osprey

08/10/2017 11:13 PM

BTW, I'm both an airplane and helicopter pilot, and this is the same reason I would not fly a manned "drone" either.

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#14

Re: Osprey

08/11/2017 3:06 AM
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