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Blast Freezing Water Into Ice Blocks

09/29/2017 11:33 PM

Is blast freezing water (about 1.5 ton) in a number of aluminium can moulds to produce ice block possible within 6 hours?

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#1

Re: Blast freezing water into Ice blocks

09/29/2017 11:57 PM

Sure, no problem!

All it would take is some liquid Ni. That's a lot of small cans or one very large one. I'd go with the small cans.

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#3
In reply to #1

Re: Blast freezing water into Ice blocks

09/30/2017 1:07 AM

Thanks for your valued response.

I think of employing vapour compression refrigeration with appropriate refrigerant other than nitrogen.

Fedani.

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#7
In reply to #3

Re: Blast freezing water into Ice blocks

10/02/2017 3:46 AM

How wonderfully creative.

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#10
In reply to #3

Re: Blast freezing water into Ice blocks

10/02/2017 12:56 PM

I've seen ammonia cycle freezers that would do this in minutes rather than hours.

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#2

Re: Blast freezing water into Ice blocks

09/30/2017 12:07 AM

No need to blast freeze....what you need is a bath that is maintained well below freezing....

http://www.fao.org/docrep/006/y5013e/y5013e05.htm

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#4

Re: Blast freezing water into Ice blocks

09/30/2017 2:12 AM

Immersing the cans in chilled brine would probably be faster and cheaper.

The thinner you can make the cans (at least in one dimension) the better; freezing time varies roughly as the square of thickness.

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#5

Re: Blast Freezing Water Into Ice Blocks

10/01/2017 12:32 PM

Don't forget about the taper required to force the Ice upward as it freezes and expands. Also, a low-friction coating may be required on the insides. Once the block starts to move upward, it will lose contact with the bottom, so heat conduction will be slowed.

If the cans are not tapered, they will get bigger with each use and will soon break.

...or perhaps the side walls of the cans could be corrugated in such a way as to allow the cans to expand, and spring back after use.

Are the ice blocks to be removed from the cans for use?

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#6

Re: Blast Freezing Water Into Ice Blocks

10/01/2017 1:15 PM

A member of my family is the owner of a store called, " Freeze San Diego " , where he uses liquid nitrogen to blast freeze the liquid components of ice cream into a saleable product in minutes.

Since water has a lesser density than a mixed liquid substrate, the process should be adaptable to your application.

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#8

Re: Blast Freezing Water Into Ice Blocks

10/02/2017 11:06 AM

Using cold air blast freezing alone might not be the most cost-effective or efficiently rapid means available.

Mental experiment:

(1) VCC cycle chiller for the incoming water, chilled down to within 1 °C of normal freezing point, with tight control of the approach temperature on the water side.

(2) VCC cycle chiller output maintains brine tank (or propylene glycol tank depending on requirements) to extreme sub-cooled temperature.

(3) VCC chills air in contact with water spray jet from the 1°C tank, producing "sleet" that falls into the aluminum can moulds, with the moulds on a rotating fill head. Between shots of sleet that fill the mould to a given level, the mould transfer to a press momentarily where a ram compacts the "sleet" to one solid mass.

(4) at the end of one rotation, the mould is discharged to one 1.5 ton block solid ice.

I suspect this would take far less than 6 hours, depending on the properties required for the ice block and its purpose, the tonnage of the chiller, etc.

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#9
In reply to #8

Re: Blast Freezing Water Into Ice Blocks

10/02/2017 12:32 PM

Interesting idea! Why not have the sleet falling continuously on one side of the rotating mechanism, with a ram compressing one can at a time on the opposite side? The rotation could be step-wise, giving the ram time to press and retract at each step.

The cans (and the ram) would best be pie-section shaped, for uniform layer thickness in a rotating system. If the blocks need to be rectangular, the motion would probably better be linear.

Another possibility, especially if the blocks need to be transparent or maximum density, would be to use short bursts of radiant energy to partially melt only that top layer before or instead of the ram.

But then, why not just spray a thin layer of the 1° C water on each can as it passes underneath the nozzle, and let it freeze before the next spray. In this case, it could be the nozzle that moves, instead of the cans.

Either way, by adding thin layers, it might be possible to force the expansion of the water upward and avoid bulging the cans...

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#11
In reply to #9

Re: Blast Freezing Water Into Ice Blocks

10/02/2017 12:56 PM

That is why old ice plants used slope sided galvanized freeze cans.

Why not use centrifugal force to press the "sleet" into frozen blocks, by use of a mist over spray of pre-chilled water as you mentioned? This way, the entire mandrel is circular, with whatever shaped sections required, with some serious mass behind the entire flywheel, since we are talking a lot of tons if each container is 1.5 tons.

The moulds would be open on two sides: The upper (sleet entrance), and the central (water spray). Centripetal acceleration force would possibly produce just enough pressure to result in pressure melting of the "sleet" just about the time the water freezes to it, and with the entire mandrel spinning in brine, optimal heat transfer to result in a hard frozen block would be the result.

Block de-mounting from mandrel may require removal and hot air blast?

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