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Anonymous Poster #1

Nozzle Loads for Injection Package

11/13/2017 9:18 AM

How we can find allowable nozzle load on a 150# RF, B16.5 flange, which is one of the tie in point of a package & clamped with the support, on the base frame

This is a blind flange threaded & one end is connected to 1/2" x 0.035" WT tubing with NPT x OD (tube) adapter. Tubing is coming from the pump discharge with valves & accessories. Other end (RF) of flange will be connected to client piping.

Most of the Nozzle loads refers to vessel or directly from the pump. Just gone through API 610 also. Couldn't find a solution.

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#1

Re: Nozzle Loads for Injection Package

11/13/2017 2:10 PM

It depends somewhat upon the rating of the pressure flange at whatever temperature the process runs at, as piping connections de-rate with temperature; whatever is the lowest pressure rating of this and the other components at this temperature will be the answer.

If in doubt, ask a local Process Engineer to help out.

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#2

Re: Nozzle Loads for Injection Package

11/14/2017 4:43 AM

You need to explain your set-up in more detail. It sounds like a RF blind flange with a 1/2" NPT threaded hole, bolted to a pipe flange. If so, you don't give the main pipe size. Is the pipe horizontal, vertical or at some other angle?

It's not unusual for specifiers (in this case your client) to say their pipe connections (for horizontal pipes) are designed to take vertical loads only, not horizontal loads, or bending or torsional moments. If that's the case, you could ask the client what load he can accept, and by adequately supporting your pipe ensure you comply.

Unless the client's pipe supports limit it to something lower, the vertical force is determined by the allowable shear stress in the pipe wall. If the main pipe is a fair size, it's unlikely loads from your 1/2" pipe will cause a problem.

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