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Art From The Big Planet

01/08/2018 7:03 PM

Awesome view...

"SPACE PHOTOS OF THE WEEK: JUNO SNATCHES A SHOT OF JUPITER'S SWIRLING STORMS

HAPPY NEW YEAR from the depths of outer space! While you were getting ready for your holiday vacation, NASA’s space probes were hard at work gathering awesome photos for you. Like Juno, the little spacecraft capturing the Earth-sized tempests while orbiting Jupiter. This massive gas giant is famous for its swirling clouds, and has become the planetary poster child for storms, in large part due to Juno’s mind-blowing images. One reason Juno is able to capture such spectacular snapshots is because it flies so close to Jupiter with each pass, bringing the spacecraft within one Earth diameter to the cloud tops. That might seem far, but for the largest planet in the solar system, swooping down to around 8,200 miles above the clouds is mighty close—and we have the awesome photos to prove it."

https://www.wired.com/story/space-photos-of-the-week-juno-snatches-a-shot-of-jupiters-swirling-storms/

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#1

Re: Art from the Big Planet

01/08/2018 7:36 PM

Looks like a good place for Hell to exist...

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#2

Re: Art from the Big Planet

01/08/2018 9:04 PM

Absentee member ky creates earthly paintings that resemble these photos.

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#3
In reply to #2

Re: Art from the Big Planet

01/08/2018 9:37 PM

All this pretty art comes from two sources, convection from internal heat and mixing from Jupiter's rapid rotation.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internal_heating

"This image shows Jupiter’s south pole, as seen by NASA’s Juno spacecraft from an altitude of 32,000 miles. The circles are storms that are up to 600 miles in diameter, according to NASA. The image is a mosaic of multiple images stitched together so that all parts of the planet’s south pole are in daylight. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Betsy Asher Hall/Gervasio Robles)"

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2017/06/26/these-are-the-photos-of-jupiters-weather-that-everyone-is-talking-about/?utm_term=.4ae08883bb81

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#4
In reply to #3

Re: Art from the Big Planet

01/09/2018 9:28 AM

I'm going to take a little tangent here:

I've always disliked how astronomy/planetary sciences can attribute a rate of rotation for a gaseous planet. The rate of rotation for the Earth is not based on the speed of the jet stream, the track velocity of a storm, the progression rate of any weather front or even the speed of the Atlantic Gulf stream. I know we cannot peer through the cloud cover of a gas giant to identify a solid feature (if any exist) and track its rotational velocity. A gas giant planet (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune) should be attributed a rotation velocity of N/A (Not Applicable).

Still, those are some really cool images.

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#5
In reply to #4

Re: Art from the Big Planet

01/09/2018 11:35 AM

How do we know there might be a rocky core, or not, based on the sheer size, and gas density of the object. I agree that we are not looking at a solid surface, and somehow attributing planetary rotation to that.

Nice pictures, though.

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#6
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Re: Art from the Big Planet

01/09/2018 3:49 PM

You are correct, the sun and gas giant planets don't have specific rotation velocity. In the case of Jupiter, I think the "official rotation rate" is determined by the rotation of the magnetosphere.

https://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/multimedia/largest/jupiter_magnetosphere.jpg.html

"Jupiter is a ball of gas, and so it actually experiences differential rotation. The rotation takes different amounts of time depending on where you are on the planet. The rotation of Jupiter at its poles takes about 5 minutes longer than the rotation of Jupiter at its equator. So the commonly quoted 9.9 hours is actually an average amount for the entire planet.

Scientists actually use three different systems to calculate the rotation of Jupiter. System 1 is for latitudes 10 degrees north and south of Jupiter’s equator – the rotation is 9 hours 50 minutes. System II is for latitudes north and south of this region, and the rotation rate is 9 hours, 55 minutes. These rates are measured by how long it takes for specific storms to come back into view. The final system, System III, measures the rotation speed of Jupiter’s magnetosphere and is usually considered the official rotation rate."

https://www.universetoday.com/23914/rotation-of-jupiter/

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#7

Re: Art From The Big Planet

01/10/2018 12:01 AM

Makes you wonder what it looks like from the other side looking out.

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#8

Re: Art From The Big Planet

01/10/2018 10:59 AM

Very interesting. Maybe next time they'll be able to take videos to analyze the dynamics. Very interesting indeed.

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#9
In reply to #8

Re: Art From The Big Planet

01/10/2018 2:47 PM

They did, all one has to do is look.

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#10
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Re: Art From The Big Planet

01/11/2018 8:51 PM

It's interesting. But, as with typical videos, there's no reference to know whether it's in real time or time-lapse or what. it's so easy to edit. Some computer generated graphics are so realistic, it's hard to tell what's real or enhanced. There's no info, besides the appearance of it being a "hollywood" production for entertainment. I'm not really sure what to make of it. But, it's still interesting.

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#11
In reply to #10

Re: Art From The Big Planet

01/11/2018 9:42 PM

It's "enhanced" because the camera flying by Jupiter is more sensitive to light than our eyes. This is because sunlight is 1/27 (3.7%) as bright as it appears here. In comparison the moon has a reflectivity of about 13.7%. Therefore a full moon is just under four times brighter than the solar brightness reaching Jupiter. A waxing crescent moon light level would then be the nearest light level but Earth shine on the darker side of the moon will still contribute some. At these low light levels, our eyes cannot see color very well and certainly not this detail.

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