CR4 - The Engineer's Place for News and Discussion®

Previous in Forum: ACRYLIC SINKS   Next in Forum: Carbon Black
Close

Comments Format:






Close

Subscribe to Discussion:

CR4 allows you to "subscribe" to a discussion
so that you can be notified of new comments to
the discussion via email.

Close

Rating Vote:







45 comments
Member

Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 7

Recycling used oil

01/28/2008 1:32 AM

There is a big quantity of engine and transmission used oil (Diesel & gasoline engines)

Do you recommend to recycle it and use it?

What type of recycling machines you recommend?

What will be the life time of This oil

Thanks

Register to Reply
Pathfinder Tags: oil recycling
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.
Guru
Popular Science - Biology - New Member Hobbies - Musician - New Member APIX Pilot Plant Design Project - Member - New Member Hobbies - CNC - New Member Fans of Old Computers - ZX-81 - New Member

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Centurion, South Africa
Posts: 3829
Good Answers: 92
#1

Re: Recycling used oil

01/28/2008 1:56 AM

If the oil is inedible and can be used to power a non-edible lamp you could donate it to the village mentioned in the post "Nonedible oil lamps"

There are oil recycling plants everywhere. (in SA at least)

__________________
Never do today what you can put of until tomorrow - Student motto
Register to Reply
Guru
United Kingdom - Member - Indeterminate Engineering Fields - Control Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: In the bothy, 7 chains down the line from Dodman's Lane level crossing, in the nation formerly known as Great Britain - possibly to become "South Scotland" or "Non-Caledonia" from September 2016. Kettle's on.
Posts: 22847
Good Answers: 591
#2

Re: Recycling used oil

01/28/2008 4:28 AM

The heritage railways sector makes use of large quantities of it in the UK. This sector operates largely in what might be described as "siege economy" conditions:

  • General-purpose switch, check-rail and mechanical signalling component lubricant.
  • "Alternative" fishplate and fishbolt lubricant.
  • "Alternative" recovered timber sleeper preservative, by absorption.
  • For the manufacture of 'clag bombs' for steam locomotive locomotive fireboxes (these are used to produce spectacular exhaust effects for lineside photographers).
  • As a rust-prevention coating for locomotives' components that are to be laid-up for a few years.
  • As a preliminary combustion fluid during the initial stages of raising steam.
__________________
"Did you get my e-mail?" - "The biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place" - George Bernard Shaw, 1856
Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Cosmology - New Member United States - Member - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: 33.49N, 84.19W
Posts: 1492
Good Answers: 3
#19
In reply to #2

Re: Recycling used oil

01/30/2008 9:24 PM

Are steam locomotives still used in the UK?

About the only place you'll find one in the U.S. is on a historic railway journey (tourist attraction).

-John

__________________
All worthwhile programmers know that constants always vary.
Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 14936
Good Answers: 161
#20
In reply to #19

Re: Recycling used oil

01/31/2008 4:37 AM

As far as I am aware, it is much the same in all of Europe, only for special occasions and museum runs. But thank goodness there are plenty of these!

China still uses some I believe as does South America.

I watch Bahn TV ( The German Railway has its own Digital Satellite channel unencrypted (which can be received all over Europe) and it shows nostalgic film and videos made by German Tourists.....very, very interesting indeed, even if you do not understand German.

They actually showed the trams from Blackpool in all their ancient glory a few days ago, by day and by night. Blackpool is still worth a visit.

__________________
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt!"
Register to Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 149
Good Answers: 7
#3

Re: Recycling used oil

01/28/2008 10:16 AM

Most oil recycled in America goes to fire kilns in concrete manufacturing facilities. The infrastructure is set up here to handle it and if you have a large quantity some companies may send a truck to carry it off, perhaps even give you some money for it. Check with your local distributors to see if they have this capability. At the very least they may just let you bring it in for free.

A lot of automotive service stations use their old oil to heat the shop during the winter months. There are special air handling units that can be purchased specifically designed for this purpose. Local codes prevent individuals from using these in many areas, but businesses can have them to save on heating costs during the winter.

Lastly check with the local road construction companies. They use oil when putting down new asphalt. They may want this.

Register to Reply
Guru
Canada - Member - New Member Hobbies - Musician - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Western Canada
Posts: 1863
Good Answers: 39
#4
In reply to #3

Re: Recycling used oil

01/28/2008 11:37 PM

Safety-Kleen is a large corporation that collects the used oil which is then re-refined in some small sized refineries they bought and took out of mothballs. This re-refining process uses the used lube oil almost like crude oil and they provide the requisite additives to formulate the oil to match new oil as to viscosity and additioves to meet engine spec. A number of automotive retailers sell this recycled oil at a discount from new oil. They clearly advertise that this is recycled oil and are not attempting to mislead the public.

Evidently this recycling practice is not universal in all of North America. But it sure makes sense.

__________________
Elnav
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Retired Engineers / Mentors - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Brecksville, OH
Posts: 1391
Good Answers: 17
#15
In reply to #3

Re: Recycling used oil

01/29/2008 1:28 PM

SOme steel mills used recycled oils or solvents to fire into the blast furnaces 9or in earlier years to open hearth furnaces).

__________________
"Stupidity got us into this mess, then why can't it get us out?" : Will Rogers
Register to Reply
Commentator

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Argentina
Posts: 59
#5

Re: Recycling used oil

01/28/2008 11:43 PM

Step 1 - Use a magnetic separator for removing ferrous metals from used mineral oil.

Step 2 - Filter to remove non ferrous metals, carbon and solids.

Step 3 - Evaporate not wanted fluids solved in oil at 90ºC. Part of hidrocarbure evaporated can be condensed for use to feed the fire needed in evaporator. Rest of gas must be threated before send to air (see note)

Step 4 - One centrifugator can remove the last rest of solids in oil.

Step 5 - The oil can be filtered and used as low cost lubricant or may add some aditives to enhace perfomance.

Note: Exhaust gas to meet ISO 14000 std must be burn at 1600ºC several seconds and pass through scrubbers with very alkaline water before send to atmosphere.

Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 14936
Good Answers: 161
#6

Re: Recycling used oil

01/29/2008 5:11 AM

What should also be done is to educate the general US public that from new (or even fairly new) cars filled with synthetic oil not only provides better lubrication, but for considerable longer periods than the cheap mineral oils that get replaced every 3,500 miles or so by most people.....

You save not only on replacement parts over long periods, but also on paying someone less often to replace the oil in the first place!!

I have been using Synthetics since about 1990 on 5 or six cars, some of which achieved over 400,000 kms and were still running and starting the same as a relatively new engine....one engine was also badly over heated (running on petrol instead of diesel) and needed a replacement head and head gasket, otherwise ok....it ran a further 100,000 kms with us before being sold in a fully running condition!!

On modern VW cars with the 2.0 TDI engine, you can go to around 20,000 miles between oil changes (according to the computer) and that was in spite of towing a 1.5 metric ton caravan for long periods!!! I had two Sharans and a Touran with this motor, my present Mitsubishi also has this motor from VW!!

If more people used synthetic, the amounts of oil that would need to be recycled could be drastically reduced!!!

Some people won't buy it, just because it is more expensive......! This is the most stupid reason I have heard.......it lasts usually around 6 times longer and even if it was 6 times more expensive, the extra life out of the engine alone repays you completely!!!

A new TDI half engine from VW costs around $7,200 here in Germany, depending upon the model....plus the labor and the time the car is off the road etc etc....it can easily go to more than $8,000.....

By the way, I am not going to argue with anyone over this on CR4, either you are interested in improving the environment or you are not, its your complete loss if you do not try it out!!!!

I am just informing you of the way it really is, nothing more nothing less. Most europeans with modern diesel cars have synthetic oil and extended oil changes already as it is in the car's handbook and laid down by the manufacturer!!!!

__________________
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt!"
Register to Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 149
Good Answers: 7
#7
In reply to #6

Re: Recycling used oil

01/29/2008 8:13 AM

Ahhh... the great synthetic oil debate. Does synthetic provide better lubrication? Yes, I use it in the track car.

Can you drive your car for longer periods between oil changes? That is debatable. Part of the reason you change oil is because it accumulates acids which are by-products of the combustion process. These acids corrode your bearings and cyllinder walls, more so in gas engines rather than diesels. Some people say you need to change your oil at the same intervals no matter what type you use just to clean these acids out and to prevent them from building up.

Synthetic oils were developed by the military back in the 50's for use in their vehicles mostly because regular maintenance is not always possible in the field. Having oil that does not break down as quickly as conventional oil is therefore required. The other reason was they wanted oil that would perform better in extremely cold/hot environments, which synthetic does.

In my opinion the synthetic oil debate is unresolved. Change your oil on a regular basis and the engine will last forever. I have put 200K miles on gasoline engines without issue simply be changing my conventional oil every 3000 miles. A well maintained car will do that no matter what oil you use. If you are using your engine in severe applications such as racing, then the synthetic is justified.

Register to Reply
Anonymous Poster
#9
In reply to #7

Re: Recycling used oil

01/29/2008 9:31 AM

I must admit I was a synthetic oil convert and have achieved engine life over what I would be considered the norm. However -

I have a Midas (evolution of the Mini Marcos) with a 1/2 race spec engine [AVONBAR 'A' series engine; bored out to 1400cc, high compression head, etc.] which I used to run with Mobil 1 synthetic oil. The engine on strip down after 60,000 showed no ware! the oil pump could have gone back. The reason for the strip down was gear box failure for a second time. I know the gearbox was not designed for 120bhp but this was the second one in the life of the car. We do not 'boy race' the car by the way it is normal work transport.

On speaking to both gearbox & oil specialists I was told gearboxes do not like synthetic oils, although these oils have good properties as previously mentioned they do not work well under the high crushing pressures of gear teeth. I was recommended to go to a semi-synthetic or mineral based oil when gearboxes are involved. I do continue to use synthetic in my car with a separate gearbox.

Regarding another posted comment whether people like it or not the UK is in Europe! Use of 100% synthetic oil here is certainly lower than mineral, true semi is becoming more popular but with many gearboxes running in sumps it is probably the best environmental solution, besides cost will always be an issue to the non technical consumer.

Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 14936
Good Answers: 161
#12
In reply to #9

Re: Recycling used oil

01/29/2008 10:21 AM

Although the Guest mentioned it in passing, the design of the A-Series engine for the old Minis means that the gearbox is lubricated by the engine oil. A serious design flaw as it is also not good for the engine either as gearboxes tend to drop tiny pieces of metal into the oil, which is eventually gathered on a magnet somewhere, or it lands (hopefully ) in the oil filter!!!

It was a design compromise that should never have been made, but in 1959, the risk was worth it!!!

The use of synthetic oil can only be recommended where the engine oil and the gearbox oil are completely separate entities......as the lubrication needs of both units are almost completely different.

As pointed out, the shearing of oil within a gearbox, needs special oil and not motor oil.

But even semi synthetic or mineral oil is simply not good enough for a gearbox over long distances.....in 1959 the average motorist put probably less than 5,000 miles a year on his car........it took a long time to wear out at that rate!!!

With the BHP available on the guest's car, it will not surprise me to hear that with any oil, the life of the gearbox will remain as it was with the synthetic!! No better no worse....

__________________
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt!"
Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 14936
Good Answers: 161
#10
In reply to #7

Re: Recycling used oil

01/29/2008 10:09 AM

Synthetic oil is the panacea that no US (or at least very, very few) citizen will try out!!!!

Therefore Healybj8, but you must be a US citizen with this outlook, I just checked as well, you are...... But that was not difficult to guess really.....you are not alone!!!

How many millions of European and Japanese cars run for extended periods on synthetic oil I could not even guess at. For most cars built since 2000 it is a requirement! At least here in Europe......and more each year.....surely the same car in the USA also needs to run on synthetic????

It is nothing new, I have been doing it since 1990. VW have been making it a requirement to do otherwise your warranty is gone since about 2001 or 2002 or thereabouts. Porsche and Mercedes even longer I am reliably informed, though I drive neither type!!!

Why would large companies as these, take such a risk with their profits, if it really damaged engines? Of course there is no risk, they tested it for years and years on all types of engines under every possible condition of load and terrain etc... before finding out how good it was for both the engines and the environment.

Also, many companies are going for the longer service interval and therefore synthetic is the only way to handle the long periods between oil changes.....

THEY KNOW WHEN TO PUT THEIR MONEY ON THE RIGHT HORSE!

But sadly, citizens of the USA have their 3,000 mile change interval ingrained on their petrol drinking V-8s and will not try something "new fangled and modern!!

......come on Guys, get moving with modern ideas, we are not in the 1950s anymore......you really should try smaller engines, with more power and better mileage and less oil drinking!!!

If you Guys would only realize that you are not extending the life of your engines with frequent changes of a cheap oil that does not lubricate well even during the short oil change intervals, nowhere near as well as a synthetic on the longer change intervals!!!!

I saw the test (200,000 kms) and the tear down of a VW Golf diesel on a recent Motoring TV show. After 200,000 kms on Synthetic, the bore and bearings were still within new manufacturers build tolerances and were guaranteed by the team to be good for a minimum of at least another 100,000 kms.......the engine was basically run in an nothing more!!!!!

That is what Synthetics can do as well as reducing the huge amounts of used oil that have to be disposed of/burnt!!

Come on in the water is great!!!...and the oil!!

__________________
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt!"
Register to Reply Score 1 for Off Topic
Associate

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: RI, USA
Posts: 28
#13
In reply to #10

Re: Recycling used oil

01/29/2008 12:24 PM

Andy, I think you have a very good point that sythetics are, indeed, better than petroleum motor oils. But, the American public is going to do what their car owner's manual tells them to do -- and for the most part, Ford, GM, and Chrysler have not embraced the synthetic motor oil enough to recommend extended drain intervals between changes. Nobody wants to void their warranty because they didn't change the oil per the book.

Who's to say that there isn't a reason why American car makers have not made the switch? It probably needs to be tested for years before a large enough sampling of results can prove the benefits of synthetic oils. Recalls, insurance claims, and lawsuits are expensive. The car makers are having enough trouble staying in business, although, one could argue that extended drain intervals and engine life are a good selling point. My wife's new Ford Escape has a 7,500-mile oil change interval with standard oil. I'm not sure how that can be, but Ford recommends it, so that's what I am going to do.

Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 14936
Good Answers: 161
#14
In reply to #13

Re: Recycling used oil

01/29/2008 1:19 PM

You may have put your (greasy) finger right on the point in question, American Car makers......!!!and we all know how perfectly made the US cars are, never rust or go wrong, use minimal fuel. Oh dear!!! What am I saying????

Is there anyone reading this in the USA, with a Japanese or European car of modern vintage, say less than 5 years old? If yes, what oil must you use?a nd what is the change interval?

__________________
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt!"
Register to Reply
Associate

Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: NoWhere NH, USA
Posts: 34
Good Answers: 1
#33
In reply to #10

Re: Recycling used oil

02/05/2008 7:38 AM

"... you must be a US citizen with this outlook, <snip> .....you are not alone!!!"

Good answers on the topic of synthetics AG. My experience ... '97 Corolla DL, regular synthetic oil changes (I'd like to say every 3,500 mi. but my nose would grow). The mileage on this engine? 456,789 mi. the last time my son took a picture of the odometer . p.s. Northern NH, USA

Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 14936
Good Answers: 161
#34
In reply to #33

Re: Recycling used oil

02/05/2008 8:12 AM

I assume, as you did not mention anything else, that the engine runs just like any other with less than 100,000 miles on the clock! please correct me if I am wrong!!

My diesels and a few petrol engines that I have owned since 1990 all were running as good as any other engine with a lot less miles on them with up to best part of 300,000 miles on some before I sold them, still running well!....

...but still sort of chicken feed compared to the mileage you have achieved!!! WOW!!

I have yet to meet anyone who has put his money where his mouth is and used synthetic oil, who had problems that could only be the result of the synthetic!! I have heard lots of stories, but nothing really solid....all of the bad claims could just as easily have happened when using mineral oil.....eg. a mechanical problem.

But as mineral oil lubricated engines are dying daily! One or two with Synthetic are only to be expected.....

I sincerely believe that certain engines are probably NOT suitable for synthetic, VW Beetle air cooled and Minis where the oil is shared with the gearbox are two possibilities that I can think of....

__________________
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt!"
Register to Reply
Associate

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: RI, USA
Posts: 28
#35
In reply to #33

Re: Recycling used oil

02/05/2008 9:50 AM

Is this the untold story behind the Toyota Corolla advertising campaign? "Just ask someone you know." I assumed that the Corolla could easily achieve over 300,000 miles on regular oil based on their TV commercials. Your mileage is truly remarkable, so your attention to maintenance and your driving style must be commended.

To set the record straight, I have praised synthetics for years for the ability to go longer between oil changes. Oil changes are a hassle, even for someone with experience (I worked in a garage for a few years-hence the name). I was all for it when I could extend my driving over 3,000 miles between changes. Recently I am seeing less justification to dish out $7 a quart for synthetics when Ford is saying I can drive 7,500 miles on regular oil in both my '06 F-350 diesel (takes 15 qts!), and my '08 Excape V6. The way I see it, as long as I stay regular with all the preventive maintenance, these vehicles will last as long as I need.

Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 14936
Good Answers: 161
#36
In reply to #35

Re: Recycling used oil

02/05/2008 10:31 AM

You are missing the point I was trying to make (many others did too so maybe I did not state it clearly enough!) the best reason for using synthetic oil is not just the financial savings if it is used to drive up to 5 x longer per oil change than with conventional oil, nor is it to make your engine last longer (which it really does, which is why so many European makes have it as a requirement!!

But it is to a) reduce the amount of oil needed to be pumped out of the ground in the first place and b) to reduce the amount that needs to be recycled afterwards!! Think of your kids and grandkids.....

(Not as some Rednecks do that they just chuck it down the toilet!!)

"You know you're a Redneck if your toilet has sump oil stains in an around the bowl!!"

Even if at the end of the day you are not one red cent richer or that the engine does not last even 5 minutes longer than with mineral oil, please think of the environment!!

I ought to mention at this point that many European & Japanese cars are now designed to go to either 30 or 50,000 kms between services.....unless the computer tells you to change the oil, you may need an earlier oil change only.

My last two VWs needed an oil change between 31-33,000 kms....but there was a lot of heavy kms with a 1.5 ton trailer......As we now have a 2 year warranty on our cars by law, (some have much longer warranties than that) the manufacturer has to make sure that he will not be responsible for expensive repairs at any time, so the Synthetic oil is a requirement.

If you only get a 1 year guarantee on your car in the USA(is that still true?), then the manufacturer has little of no interest in the oil you need to use as when the problems come, its usually going to be after the guarantee/warranty has long run out!!!!

What is the standard guarantee in the USA nowadays?

I hope this has cleared up the best reason of all for using Synthetic oil for you....

__________________
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt!"
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Associate

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: RI, USA
Posts: 28
#38
In reply to #36

Re: Recycling used oil

02/05/2008 12:05 PM

Andy,

I heard what you said. I am sorry, but while I agree synthetic oil is good stuff, I have to disagree with your arguments. Reducing our dependence on petroleum oil is something we all need to work on for our future. The negative effects of oil are not only from burning it and releasing carbon into the air, but also from the environmental damage from oil drilling sites, spills, and refinery pollution. Synthetic oil is a start to reducing all this, but not a solution.

Think on this: From a barrel of crude oil, 50% of it becomes gasoline. Jet fuel, kerosene, and diesel make up a slightly smaller percentage. Lubricants make up only 1%. The rest are things like wax, asphalt, etc. There is little waste. What kind of diesel are you burning in your cars? If you are burning petroleum diesel like me and the rest of the world, our engines consume much more petroleum fuel than lubricant. So without switching to biodiesel, ethanol, or some other renewable fuel, we put the same strain on our environment whether or not there are a few quarts of synthetic oil in the sump. I will gladly use biodiesel if it were available in my area.

On your second point, if we can recycle the used oil, where's the harm done? (As long as it really is recycled, and not burned in cement factories).

FYI: Most U.S. cars have at least a 3 year/36,000 mile bumper-to-bumper warranty, and engine warranty is sometimes longer (5 yrs/100,000 on my Powerstroke diesel).

Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 6)
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 14936
Good Answers: 161
#39
In reply to #38

Re: Recycling used oil

02/06/2008 3:32 AM

We should be saving in any area where we can with regards to fossil fuel/oils.....

Sadly, although my car's engine will run on Bio Diesel (I checked carefully before buying), the built in water heater does not!! So I am stuck with using normal Diesel....bummer.

My next car (if there is going to be a "next") may be a gas (as in propane, methane etc., not petrol!) car as the price for Autogas is half that of Diesel.....lower mileage though, must work out if the conversion will save anything!)

I would like to see another Bio alternative in this area, hopefully soon......I think that waiting for cheap hydrogen will be a long wait!!!

__________________
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt!"
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
Safety - Hazmat - New Member Engineering Fields - Mining Engineering - New Member Engineering Fields - Construction Engineering - New Member Hobbies - Hunting - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
Posts: 940
Good Answers: 12
#40
In reply to #36

Re: Recycling used oil

02/06/2008 8:35 AM

My two Chevys have 10 yr 100,000 mile powertrain warranty plus 10yr 100,000 bumper to bumper they are both 2007 models they manual requires use to change every 7500 to 8000 miles or 12000 to 13000 km of 5 W 30 at a price of 1/2 synthetics which are claiming the same turn around time, I don't know for a car I don't plan on keep more then three years regular oil seems to be the way to go.

Recycling oil is expensive also it is much more lucrative to have your used oil bought from you then used as a fuel then waste time money and energy trying to recycle it. The company I work for has a fleet of over 200 dump trucks, number of other construction equipment, and mining equipment. It would cost us over $500,000 a year to recycle plus having to worry about the environmental impact from the contaminants left over. Instead we make $750,000 a year in profits from selling it or using it as a fuel, which is a much bigger impact in helping the environment.

__________________
John J Baker
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru

Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Ottawa Canada
Posts: 1981
Good Answers: 118
#41
In reply to #36

Re: Recycling used oil

02/09/2008 10:31 AM

I had always heard that the castrol oil (tm) that I used for so many years was made from vegetable oil. Never really thought about that...it just works good. I see that Castrol is now making "Syntek" and advertising it like crazy.

Google searches don't seem to help....all I get is hype and bullshit advertising. Was it made from vegetable oil, and is switching to syntek really better for the environment?

(I think it is since longer life engines mean fewer engines being made, making for tremendous environmental savings...but it is hard to take the long view)

__________________
If it was easy anybody could do it.
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Power-User

Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 409
Good Answers: 5
#27
In reply to #7

Re: Recycling used oil

02/02/2008 2:15 AM

Tend to agree with you- but the secret for longlife engine is change engine oil & full flow filter together- do mostly long runs-moderate driving- coolant system ok-& most important- a well built engine to close standards- I change oil & filter at 10,000km- I use cheap oil to the proper standards SF/SG 20W/50- the vehicle has done 694,000km & still runs like new- despite being used mostly on unpaved back roads- the vehicle gets a genuine 41mpg on unleaded fuel- made in 1978 by Isuzu, 1600cc. Not to mention airfilter maintenance at 10k also(&other maintenance as needed)- the trouble with too high a standard of oil (expensive) are glazed bores & oil consumption- I proved this many years ago- when the remedy was normal oil & seat the rings!(up a hill, top gear, accelerate flatout from 50 to 80 kmh).

Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 14936
Good Answers: 161
#30
In reply to #27

Re: Recycling used oil

02/02/2008 5:33 AM

This engine's technology from 1978 (or before) is believed to be NOT a good candidate for Synthetic oil (even if completely rebuilt as new) as although Synthetic came in the early 70's, few engines were fully designed to use it before the 1990's.....

Modern engines are built to a much tighter spec today and this I have been told is an important component for synthetic.....I personally have no problem with this either way....

__________________
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt!"
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Ottawa Canada
Posts: 1981
Good Answers: 118
#21
In reply to #6

Re: Recycling used oil

01/31/2008 11:27 AM

Would not dream of debating the issue. It is not open to debate.

Although of course, it won't hurt to do so, there is simply no reason to use synthetic oil.

I tore down my 89 Ford Aerostar engine with 300,000 kilometers on it, just because it had developed a head gasket leak. The oil had been changed at 5000 km intervals during its life time, just regular oil. It was running on the original spark plugs, and aside from some ring wear on the pistons, (less than eight thousants of an inch), there was no other measureable wear. The main bearings were checked by a sonic device, and the mechanic and I decided that there was no reason not to simply replace the head gasket and put it back into service. (Why do a lot of re-building on an engine with 300 grand on it?) It is now parked with a wonky transmission (think the bands need tightening), after another 100000km, but the rust has won....the body is now perforated. The engine still passes an emissions test after all these miles with its second set of plugs and its original rings.

This was a bit surprising since during that time (12 years or so), the vehicle was never garaged, temperatures swung wildly up and down (Ottawa is a VERY cold place in the winter, and very hot in the summer).

I don't think synthetic oil would have improved this performance. I don't see how it could!

The cost of doing all these oil changes was rather less than the cost of windshield washer fluid. So, to extend the intervals would not save me much money, if any. But short intervals don't hurt.

But then, this reply is off topic since the original question was about "what do you do with used oil"? I suspect that it costs as much to refine used oil as it does to refine new oil, but the producers cannot charge as much for it because it is "used". Therefore it is not as popular with the people who sell oil. However, I have been assured by the oil change facility that all their oil is sent to a refinery to be recycled, so somebody buys it! So its not going to destroy the environment to change oil at closer intervals.

So, the answer to your question, why would I use regular oil instead of synthetic? There is simply no benefit to using synthetic. A fellow told me once that if you change your oil every 5 thousand km, you will NEVER change an engine. My beat up old Aerostar is proof of that statement.

There may be other factors...perhaps Canadian gas is naturally low sulphur, or the fact that I never rev the engine when I start it. Or that I never over-fill it and check the level weekly. Or that I let it warm up before I move it. Or that I never take it on anything but 100km plus drives. Or that Canadian highway speeds are rather less than autobahn speeds, so engines don't rev as high. Or that I take it easy on the pedal, and take my time getting up to speed. (My neighbours tell me that they know it is me leaving the stop sign by the honking of cars behind me .) Or that I select a lane and stay in it when I am on the highway. I suspect that lots of things might have more impact on engine longevity than the kind of oil I use.

Perhaps put a 100 km/hr speed limit on the autobahn, and drive big vee eights at low revs Andy. Cars would last longer with or without those high tech oils in 'em.

;)

__________________
If it was easy anybody could do it.
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 14936
Good Answers: 161
#22
In reply to #21

Re: Recycling used oil

01/31/2008 12:00 PM

I am really pleased for you that your car is running so well, but that is not always the experience of many people that are using up the earths resources at such a high rate......changing oil at 3,000 miles + filter + costs of mechanic.....

THAT was the point, not just how well it looks after your engine, which it does STILL far better than mineral oil ever can!!!

You sadly missed the main point completely and utterly.....read back!!!

The idea is to get people to use Synthetic for longer mileage periods, to reduce the amounts of oil both used and to be recycled in the world today!!!

That is, to be environmentally friendly......and it is far better than mineral oil. So if you personally get 300,000 miles on an engine with mineral, with synthetic you may get 600,000 and at a lower cost per mile AND saving the environment and earth's resources at the same time!! WOW!!

Others may only go from 100,000 to 200,000 miles......how sad! Did you understand the point I was trying to make now?

"The way to get started is to quit talking and begin doing." -- Walt Disney

__________________
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt!"
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru

Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Ottawa Canada
Posts: 1981
Good Answers: 118
#23
In reply to #22

Re: Recycling used oil

01/31/2008 2:34 PM

ummmm....no actually. It takes resources to make synthetic oil. possibly more than regular motor oil, which is why it is more expensive. Especially when you consider that regular oil can be made from recycled oil. And if the oil is recycled, then how are we using up the earth's resources. (I mean, aside from the transport and cleaning and refining losses and so forth which would exist with synthetic as well.) The way to avoid using up the earth's resources is simply to either use renewable material (Castrol (tm) oil is treated vegetable oil I understand) or to not use it at all by parking the vehicle, and going electric or bicycle. Reducing the amount of oil in the sump, or switching to longer intervals just reduces the problem. It does not eliminate it.

My delivery van would still keep on running except that it rusted out. In fact, the engine is still just fine. But then, at the risk of missing the point again....(synthetic doesn't oxidize. I get it.) My understanding is that oil acts to clean the engine as well as lubricating it. That it is not the oil that breaks down, but rather the detergents and additives in the oil get used up in their task of cleaning the engine. Thats why it turns black. It really does not matter that the oil is better...unless it is changed, the additives get used up, the "dishrag gets dirty", so it has to be changed. If it is left in the sump, it will not pick up any more carbon, h2SO4, and carbon-nitrogen compounds which would rot the bearings, seals, and moving parts. (I have heard of some filters which perport to fix this problem, and I know of a program we used for awhile in the military where we simply changed the filter, kept the oil in the engine, but added a little bottle of "additive". We don't do that anymore. I don't know why.)

Synthetic oil won't oxidise as easily...so it can be used in hotter environments. There..it shines. Because of course, in popular modern high reving low volume engines, every trip to the grocery store is a trip around the track. These smaller engines may use less fuel, so they are popular, and they need high performance oil because they are doing a high performance job. I suspect such engines are being over-driven, and they won't last long no matter what is in the sump. (just my opinion here.)

However in day to day delivery van driving like my aerostar did, it wasn't high performance that was needed, it was good low tech cleaning of the engine, and the vehicle lasted long time with regular oil changes. Since I was not oxidising the oil by high performance driving, the interval was determined by how dirty the oil got (as determined by the SAE), not by the degration of the oil. I suppose if I was a plant manager or a fleet manager, I could have had those expensive tests done to determine the optimal oil change intervals, but who really does that?

I blame the longevity of my ford engine on the short intervals. Therefore, if I was to run my next van on synthetic I would keep the intervals short. In which case, then why bother?

Cars don't fall apart due to oil failure any more. They fixed the problem with oil. And they fixed the problem of seals degrading due to alcohol in the gas. And they fixed the problem with emmissions. They fail for a thousand other, more expensive reasons. Most of those reasons seem to involve 20 year olds with heavy feet. Which case it really doesn't matter what is lying in the sump...it is the nut behind the wheel you gotta deal with.

So, bottom line....we have many more points of agreement than otherwise, and with modern engines being very 'interesting", being as they resemble motor-generator sets and computerized jet engines than the ones we grew up with. Oils and pol in general are getting so complex that I had to subscribe to some trade publications just to keep current. Now we have to deal with issues of compatability. Is "your" synthetic oil compatable with "mine", can I replace it easily when I visit Florida or Alberta? Most failures involving grease and oil (according to one study I read about) have to do with incompatability problems. Something else for the poor mechanic on duty to deal with. I can just see me on the highway looking to top up and asking the kid "Hey, does that XYZ brand work okay with the XZQ in the car?" You know the answer is going to be "um, yeah, sure, its what we got dude!"

Surely you have dealt with some of these problems? regular mineral oil is loking better all the time.

__________________
If it was easy anybody could do it.
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 14936
Good Answers: 161
#24
In reply to #23

Re: Recycling used oil

02/01/2008 5:10 AM

You and many others will never ever let yourself be placed on another set of tracks..... if more folks bought synthetic, the price would probably drop even further and the oil usage too.....

Sad, you are really missing out!!

__________________
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt!"
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
Popular Science - Cosmology - New Member United States - Member - New Member

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: 33.49N, 84.19W
Posts: 1492
Good Answers: 3
#25
In reply to #24

Re: Recycling used oil

02/01/2008 11:06 AM

Do you, perhaps, work for a synthetic oil producer Andy? (just kidding)

__________________
All worthwhile programmers know that constants always vary.
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 14936
Good Answers: 161
#28
In reply to #25

Re: Recycling used oil

02/02/2008 4:29 AM

You are really right in a way, I suppose I try and work for them all, but no salary or other benefits!!!

Its something that really anyone with a vehicle (where the engine and gearbox do not share the same oil), where the engine is still in a good running condition, that does not lose or use oil dramatically can prove for themselves, but many are just too scared!!!

Whats the old British saying?

"You can lead a horse to water, but he has to learn to drink on his own!"

How about also:-

"You can lead a man to Synthetic oil, but his engine filler cap he must open himself"?

It reminds me of a Blond car joke:-

A Blond goes into a car parts store and orders a "710 Cap" for her car engine.

The Guy in the shop says "what is that for?"

She answers "It goes on the engine, I lost it in a road gully and thats the part number on it!"

The Guy asks for a drawing as he does not know this part.

She draws on the back of an old envelope:-

He is looking at it from the other side of the counter and he goes without a word and brings the required part.

"There you go", he says, "$3.50"

The blond pays up and leaves very happy with her new 710 cap.....

If you still don`t understand what the part was, look at the screen upside down!!!

__________________
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt!"
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru

Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Ottawa Canada
Posts: 1981
Good Answers: 118
#26
In reply to #24

Re: Recycling used oil

02/01/2008 1:38 PM

I rarely make an opinon without some facts at hand. In this case, a vehicle which I had personal experience with, a year long job looking after pol stores in the military, and 4 years handling ground equipment at a very busy airport shaped my thoughts.

Nobody disputes that synthetic oil is "better". I just proved that regular mineral oil is "good enough" for an old slow-moving delivery van that gets lots of highway driving. Is that so hard to accept?

I also proved that there is no environmental penalty from using regular mineral oil instead of synthetic. Is that really a punch to the gut?

And I posited that the costs of getting regular oil changes over the life of a vehicle is rather less important than making sure the tire pressure is regularly monitored, that the driving habits are more regulated, that tires are changed from summer to winter tires with alactrity...you know....the basic stuff. Regular maintenance including oil changes, lubrication, fluids replentishment, filter changes, are the magic wand which results in long life to a vehicle. Does this make me an old fuddy duddy?

Regarding compatability issues....THAT, I have experience with!

I have scraped out more than one sump (3 actually) full of what looked like black jello created by some bozo who topped up the motor generator set with whatever engine oil came to hand.....I couldn't "prove" it was technician maintenance error or that it was synthetic being added to top up an engine filled with mineral oil, it might have been two different brands of synthetic. The manufacturerers were quick to NOT return my calls and there are a LOT of different oils on a base. Somebody messed up, not the oil's fault. But then, how do you know what's in there when you are 200 miles away from home and there is nary a drop on the stick? The guy put in a can of oil! This little error was pretty mild compared to the bearing failures which resulted in synthetic greases being used in grease guns instead of the axle grease which was already filling the bearings. Fires resulted there. For four years as I worked in the ground handling section, I cursed the companies who were always coming up with the next best thing, and I really wanted somebody to come up with some standardization. I think if we had simply decided to just go "synthetic" things would have been much better.

http://www.whatprice.co.uk/car/synthetic-oil.html for the bean counters.

http://p2library.nfesc.navy.mil/P2_Opportunity_Handbook/6_II_4.html handbook for policy makers.

http://www.fammllc.com/famm/publications/lubes_bulletins_07.pdf for the compatability chart the poor mechanic has to memorize.

These references support your contention, (and mine too) however a close reading of them indicates a strong use of the words "may result in longer intervals",and "unsuitable for break-in periods" and "incompatible with conventional motor oil", and so forth. I dont believe that I said anything other than that!

I am awfully conservative when it comes to mechanical stuff, and can give many more examples of snags and defects which were found when the vehicle was in for a "regular oil change", any one of which would have had much more costly results than would have been saved by extending maintenance intervals.

So, as I said before, we are in more agreement than otherwise. Especially now that the world is running out of oil, we have to look at a lot of different ways to do things. The idea of a delivery van going to the junk yard after only half a million kilometers may well be a joke in a decade or so, as may be the concept of a delivery van at all! The idea of "waste oil" is already an oxymoron, and the electrical transportation age is only just begun! We might in our life time see goods transported from city to dity by pneumatic tubes, or moving roads or sidewlks. Or something none of us predicted. One thing we can be certain of is that things are NOT going to stay the same.

And Andy, your comment about me staying on this track stings a little, perhaps I stay on this track because I have seen the results of trying to drive my train on the gravel.

__________________
If it was easy anybody could do it.
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 14936
Good Answers: 161
#29
In reply to #26

Re: Recycling used oil

02/02/2008 5:28 AM

I appreciate the comments and the links, but your worries about the word "may" are slowing you down here. Sorry if my "Track Crack" upsets you....

I have personally checked out Synthetic oil, basically for you all on CR4 in a way.... over almost 20 years on vehicles from VW, Mitsubishi, Nissan and another that I have forgotten the name of..... In this I have "put my money where my mouth is", and found NOTHING negative whatsoever in the usage of Synthetic oils. From several different manufacturers from the original Synthetic to Longlife 2 and Longlife 3!!!

(I just realized that I have used Synthetic in a total of 8 vehicles, not 5 as I recently posted. Mostly new cars but also 3 secondhand ones.....)

As I have posted before, none of these vehicles ever needed a new engine, none of the engines was using oil or losing oil, even after over 400,000 km on several of them. The rest were sold between 125,000 and 200,000 kms....all engines in a perfect condition of run in, and running flawlessly.....I also got good prices for each and every one of them, I also sold at above market price......

As your links clearly showed, the running costs were actually reduced by using Synthetic oil and only going 3 times the distance between oil changes, not 5 or 6 times as would appear to be the general rule for modern cars sold in Europe!

The comment on one link that they are not recommended for running in is strange. They do not say why. Probably its because of a point that I always notice is that when running in on Synthetic oil IT TAKES ONE HELL OF A LOT LONGER FOR THE ENGINE TO LOOSEN UP Which I take it to be proof of the superior lubricating properties, stopping the wearing that "running in" really does......if you feel this is a problem, then run in using mineral oil, but many manufacturers have already put Synthetic in, it seems a shame to waste it!!!

A oil additive product called STP many years ago claimed that it was such a good lubricant, that it should not be used in new engines as they would NEVER run in!!!!

Synthetic seems to slow the process down and I would say such an engine needs approximately twice as long to run in as with mineral oil......personal observation only.

I guess if you are a race driver and need to have the engine run in before a race, don't use Synthetic as it takes too long.......but for a normal Joe with a car, surely this slow running in of the engine is a longterm benefit?

For me this point alone shows the definitive "EXTRA" that Synthetic brings in lubrication performance......

An engine run in on Synthetic therefore appears to run in much slower and I think better as NONE of the engines that I had, used much oil after the first 20,000 KMs. (They do need about 0.5 Liters per 5,000 KMs in the running in period)

I use only about 0.5 liters in 15,000 KMs at 65,000 KMs on my current Mitsubishi. From experience with the same engine in several other cars (its a VW 2.0 TD-I Motor), by the time it has reached 100,000, this will have dropped even further.....basically, no extra oil needed between changes.......and all my cars have to pull a heavy trailer (1.5 Tons) around many times a year!!! Which is supposedly bad for oil consumption!!

The knowledge that the Synthetic oil runs better at both low and high temperatures than any normal mineral oil as well as lubricating better + saving money on oil changes and the labor costs as well (yes I know you change your own, no labor costs!!) PLUS not so much oil gets used up from the earth's natural resources, nor returned for recycling MUST impress most people enough to try it out!!!

You save the Earth a little and your money!!!

Yusef1, I really do feel that a man with your experience and knowledge should feel that you also need to "put your money where your mouth is" and try out synthetic for at least a year or two as I have (I have used it for about 18 years), either to prove me right or wrong. I am sure that any testing you do will be honestly and completely reported on CR4.

I am sure in my mind that if you decided to do that you will be coming back in 24 months time and singing its praises completely.....or proving me wrong with personal experiences....

One other point, citing problems from vehicles that you personally did not have in your own personal care 100% of the time is not good enough and you know it, what was said and what actually happened can be quite different to another, in such cases a full personal test by yourself is the only answer I feel.

My own personal recommendation is that an engine should be chosen that is either new, or has less than say 60,000 miles on it and is not using or leaking any oil....

Of course I cannot really see how even an older engine will be badly affected if it runs well and does not use or lose oil......but I have no personal experience there, the oldest engine I ever used Synthetic oil in had 90,000 KMs on it......aprox 55,000 miles....

But that engine ran to 460,000 odd KM without any problems except for a new cylinder head after my wife filled the tank with petrol (it was a Diesel) and went for a fast run on the Autobahn and blew all the cooling water out!!!

The repair was the following and a new cylinder head - I refilled the water slowly while idling the motor and I did not even bother emptying the fuel tank, just added 0.5 liter Mineral oil for extra lubrication and filled it to the brim again with Diesel..... the pump was also not damaged in any way either and we ran a further 100,000 kms on that motor/pump before selling in a running condition!!!!

Without Synthetic we would have had a new motor to install, as the temp gauge was off the scale in red when I got the car back into my hands......and no cooling water to speak off.....but synthetic kept the bottom end perfectly lubricated, even the OHC shells were not damaged in anyway, even though the head was cracked between valves....

Have a great day in spite of me!!

__________________
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt!"
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru

Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Ottawa Canada
Posts: 1981
Good Answers: 118
#31
In reply to #29

Re: Recycling used oil

02/04/2008 3:01 PM

Wow Andy, you would think I pissed in your pickles!

I usually see only such strident commentary on religion, politics or hockey!

To save, what, a couple of hundred bucks during the life of a car? 1% of the cost of the fuel which went through that same engine?

Money put into regular lubrication, rust protection, good filtration of fuel and lube, paint touchups, heck, even training the kids to use a stick shift properly instead of the fancy double clutching they learn from video games has to be considered. Lower speed limits and a pre-oiler to pressurize the system before you start the motorcar? Most cars in the wrecking yard (breaker's yards) have less than 100 thou on the odometer, so who cares that they "could" have lasted 400 thou?

This discussion reminds me a bit of the fella who was trying to sell me green tea. He said, "if you drink this every day, your will live a hundred and fifty years, unless something kills you first." Riiight.

I'd gladly take you up on your challenge to use only synthetic oil in my vehicles. I am just wondering how I would be able to tell the difference since my old aerostar went for so long on the the "cheap stuff". Maybe it will burn less gasoline.

Anyway, you have sold me on the merits of synthetic oils. It can't hurt, and it won't cost much more.

__________________
If it was easy anybody could do it.
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 14936
Good Answers: 161
#32
In reply to #31

Re: Recycling used oil

02/05/2008 4:12 AM

Yusef, even if you personally don't save a single $ (which I know not to be true, you will save money, not as much as others because you do all the work yourself, but you should value your time as well!), you will be doing the environment and your engine some good.....

I am really interested that you are taking up the challenge and testing Synthetic, you are really "putting your money where your mouth is!". Well done!

I am sad to say that the testing needs a few years to be valid as you also well know, but I am 100% positive that you are doing both the environment and your wallet good and not harming your engine either!!!

I hope we get some more people joining your venture on CR4 as well!!!

Please keep us up to date on your venture.

__________________
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt!"
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru

Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Ottawa Canada
Posts: 1981
Good Answers: 118
#37
In reply to #32

Re: Recycling used oil

02/05/2008 11:44 AM

I have always used synthetic in my motor generator sets and in my compressors.....they need to run forever. I just never saw the point to extending the engine life in my motor vehicles since they would end up in the scrap pile for a hundred other reasons than engine failure.

(Plus I had a really bad experience with STP. Not the oil's fault, just take my advise, don't use it on a really old engine. But I digress.)

Most of those reasons for vehicle failure can be foxed by regular checks by a mechanic. Short oil change intervals (for me, it was 4 times a year thereabouts) made for a good excuse to drag the old heap onto the hoist , as does changing from summer to winter tires, checking of brake fluid levels, bleeding (renewing) brake fluid, changing power steering oil, and cleaning automatic transmission filters. Because some of these are so difficult, they are "let go", and eventually there are problems. My aerostar is parked because of transmission problems, brought on by lack of maintenance, because somebody said..."its a tranny, it never goes wrong!" and I believed him! Well, it DID take 300 grand to finally fail!

So, my gut feeling is that generally speaking, mechanicical devices are rarely better off by not checking on them. I think even you would agree with that Andy!

When I started doing the really regular checks and fluid changes, I was surprised how little was going wrong, compared to the constant once a month problems I was getting before. To this, I attribute the regularity of service rather than the quality of the new fluids although of course, the sheer high quality of modern engine components plays a part. Suddenly, my vehicles started running for 200 and then 300 thousand kilometers, the only real change being that I became anal about regular fluid changes.

As far as the great "experiment" of switching to syn oil, it can't hurt. But I don't know that the car won't rust out before the results of the "great experiment" are in.

So this is where I was coming from. And of course, none of the above makes any difference at all if you hit black ice at 100 kmph in Montreal at 2 AM.

Well, enough of this! I have to go and check the air pressure in my tires.

__________________
If it was easy anybody could do it.
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
Safety - Hazmat - New Member Engineering Fields - Mining Engineering - New Member Engineering Fields - Construction Engineering - New Member Hobbies - Hunting - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
Posts: 940
Good Answers: 12
#8

Re: Recycling used oil

01/29/2008 9:07 AM

There are a large number of oil collection companies out there that if you product enough used oil they will buy it off you. The company I work for uses on average 12 million gallons a year to burn during the aggregate drying process in asphalt. In the industry it's called WDLF (waste derived liquid fuel). Before WDLF is burned it must pass an array of analytical tests.

By the way used oil is a breaker and would never by used during the paving process with asphalt. They spray an emulsifier down where allows the asphalt to "stick" to the preexisting surface.

__________________
John J Baker
Register to Reply
Anonymous Poster
#11

Re: Recycling used oil

01/29/2008 10:10 AM

Check out the myfastfuel.com website for a stand-alone filtration unit, the end product of which you can blend with diesel. Their technology is based on a program the US military uses. Good luck!

Register to Reply
Anonymous Poster
#16

Re: Recycling used oil

01/29/2008 1:49 PM

Yes: I recommend recycles oil and reusing it.

The type of recycleling machine, shoule be Charcoal and Micro Filtration.

The life of the recyclels oil should be the same as new oil

Register to Reply
Power-User
Australia - Member - New Member Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Engineering Fields - Marine Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 389
Good Answers: 13
#17

Re: Recycling used oil

01/29/2008 3:25 PM

If you actually want to reuse it in an Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) you need to:

· Heat it to reduce the viscosity

· Centrifuge it to remove large lumpy bits like metal filings, nuts, bolts, pistons, etc. If there is saltwater contamination this can be reduced by adding fresh water to the contaminated oil before centrifuging it. This helps to dissolve the salts into the water so it can be separated of by the centrifuge. The water is of coarse heavier than the oil and is easily separated by the centrifuge.

· Filtration is the final step. This is usually done by a paper membrane filter but no doubt other materials could be used.

If you are going to reuse this oil in engines keep in mind that oil that is used for diesel engines will differ in viscosity and additives such as detergents. If it is possible to keep them separate this may be an advantage.

__________________
Make it so.
Register to Reply
Associate

Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Louisville, Kentucky
Posts: 30
Good Answers: 4
#18

Re: Recycling used oil

01/30/2008 8:48 AM

Don't write all of us yank's off just yet. I boarded the FULL SYNTHETIC lube bandwagon many years ago. It was further cemented when I purchased my last Camaro SS and it came with manufacturer blessings for full synthetic oils. This also extended to reccomendations for the rear diferential and the manual tranny. Synthetic is just simply superior protection to conventional oils. I also run a blend of recycled vegatable oil in mt diesel tractors. Everyone is going to have to contribute in some way or another to reduce waste, pollution and be better stewards of the resources that we have. Now where did I put my soap box?

Register to Reply
Active Contributor

Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: A5, trec step, Thuvakudi, Trichy 620015, India
Posts: 12
#42

Re: Recycling used oil

02/14/2008 1:33 AM

It is generally not advisable to reuse the recycled engine oils simply because of the reason that oils when subjected to high temperature of around 1300 degrees c will have lot of water condensation, oxidation residues, acid residues and carbon black. This would have reduced the property of the oil. However it is advisable that you filter out the contaminants and reuse it for low quality applications like waste boiler applications or for lubrications. Hope this tip helps

__________________
Uniqueness defined -- specific solutions for all processed liquids
Register to Reply
Anonymous Poster
#43

Re: Recycling used oil

06/04/2008 5:04 AM

Dear sir. We can supply this kind of machine. Please contact with us. Henryzhang1@hotmail.com

Register to Reply
Anonymous Poster
#44

Re: Recycling used oil

03/25/2009 7:13 PM

I have recently become the new designer/administrator for the website MyFastFuels.com . This used to be myfastfuel.com, but there was a "robbery", of sorts, of the business name away from the original owner. So he has built a new site at MyFastFuels.com (with the "s"). The website myfastfuel.com and Josh Hall and Bluegrass Fuel Systems, as well as, blugrassfuel.net, are not associated or affiliated with Mark Jordan and My Fast Fuels (myfastfuels.com). We are resolving all issues of misleading information presently. Thanks for your patience.

That out of the way, yes, you may find great benefit from using one of the systems made by Mark Jordan for converting and mixing waste petroleum products into clean fuel that is what you might say is a biodiesel blend. No chemicals are involved. You may visit the new site for My Fast Fuels at, obviously, http://www.myfastfuels.com , or you may call Mr. Jordan directly at (706) 975 - 2145. I hope this helps.

Regards,

E.B. McCool

Way Out There Creations

http://www.treebeds.com/wayouttherecreations.html

Register to Reply
Anonymous Poster
#45

Re: Recycling used oil

03/26/2009 12:30 AM

Sir,

Engine oils have a lot of oil depleting environments and is not economically feasible to recycle for reuse back as engine oils. It would be better if you remove moisture and suspended solids for reuse as boiler burning fuel. This will be costeffective and resaleable. Transmission oils generally have moisture and oxidation residues, you can remove thema dn reuse.

Hope the suggestion helps

Register to Reply
Register to Reply 45 comments
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.
Copy to Clipboard

Users who posted comments:

agua_doc (1); Andy Germany (14); Anonymous Poster (6); Aravind (1); bakerjohn (2); BlueAussieBoy (1); cottonmouth1963 (1); elnav (1); Greasyfingers (3); HapE2bhere (1); healybj8 (2); Hendrik (1); Johnjohn (2); Langdom (1); Neil Kwyrer (1); PWSlack (1); Yusef1 (6)

Previous in Forum: ACRYLIC SINKS   Next in Forum: Carbon Black

Advertisement