CR4 - The Engineer's Place for News and Discussion®

Previous in Forum: Removal of Organic contaminents from activated carbon powder   Next in Forum: Toomuchfun/crude pricing under fire
Close

Comments Format:






Close

Subscribe to Discussion:

CR4 allows you to "subscribe" to a discussion
so that you can be notified of new comments to
the discussion via email.

Close

Rating Vote:







39 comments
Power-User

Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 344

A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/01/2008 9:59 PM

I heared couples times before that a little 'Ammonia' is nice to repel many bugs attacks so I will be trying that a little of that stuff to control a little somehow their bites, I dont know..

Will be nice to hear few feedback on this matter.

Ouuuchhhyyy,

MC

Register to Reply
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Comments rated to be Good Answers:

These comments received enough positive ratings to make them "good answers".
Guru
United Kingdom - Member - New Member Hobbies - Musician - New Member Engineering Fields - Mechanical Engineering - New Member Hobbies - Target Shooting - New Member Engineering Fields - Power Engineering - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: South-east corner of Spain 50 48 49.24N 2 28 27.70W
Posts: 1549
Good Answers: 31
#1

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/02/2008 5:10 PM

Let me know how you get on!

__________________
“It's kind of fun to do the impossible.” Walt Disney
Register to Reply
Anonymous Poster
#2

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/03/2008 12:56 AM

Try apply citronella oil diluted with water ( 1 : 10 ). Definitely more eco-friendly.

You could also spray / swab dilute lemon grass oil ( 2 drops in a litre) on the floor.

Both work well with mosquitoes and certainly smell better than ammonia !

Register to Reply
Commentator

Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 98
Good Answers: 2
#3

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/03/2008 2:01 AM

If it is avoiding only mosquitoes in a room or house, best would be close all the doors and windows in the evening when it starts getting dark, that is when most mosquitoes enter attracted to inside light. You can open windows a few hours later ( after they enter your neighbour's house ). You may still find a few, that I guess you can easily hunt and kill . Remember you will burn a few cals by this exercise

Of course, I am also keen to know if ammonia or lemon grass oil works

Register to Reply
Anonymous Poster
#4
In reply to #3

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/03/2008 3:54 AM

If you ever stripped floor wax using ammonia--what else is there?--you would have realized that if a person can't breath ammonia, then neither would any air-breathing creature. So the real question would pertain to the concentration and total amount of ammonia needed to be an effective "repellant" in a particular area; and the effect of same on persons breathing the same, air-ammonia, mixture...and how long. It could be, that since the bad kind of mosquitoes (females) home on exhaled CO2 to get a meal, then less than noxious amounts or concentrations (applied topically) might serve the purpose of deterrence without noticeable effect on a person's breathing.

Register to Reply
Anonymous Poster
#10
In reply to #4

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/03/2008 6:25 AM

I repeat, mosquitoes detect warm-blooded air breathing animals by detecting exhaled breath, specifically, carbon dioxide. After leaving water after hatching, the insects are thereafter averse to water. As one of the best, if not the very best, of nature's flyers, a mosquito can actually fly through a rain shower, avoiding all drops!

Since piercing with proboscis takes considerable time during which mosquito would have to maintain undetected contact and pierce, both, through water and skin, there would be no advantage to seeking moisture laden prey upon which to alight.

A large portion of mosquito populations inhabit sub-polar regions...in which region a mosquito seeking sweat could go a very long time between feedings.

Mosquitoes "prey" on non-sweating animals...birds for example.

The explanation why it might be perceived that mosquitoes home in on sweat, would be that a person who is sweating is, in all likelihood, also breathing heavily...exhaling more CO2 for the mosquito to home in on. Studies reveal mosquitoes able to detect concentrations of CO2 at considerable distances relative to the mosquito's size.

Register to Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 380
Good Answers: 2
#12
In reply to #10

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/03/2008 8:55 AM

I can confirm by personal experience that mosquitos don't land on heavily sweating skin.

Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 14802
Good Answers: 157
#6
In reply to #3

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/03/2008 4:17 AM

Firstly, remember that Mosquitoes are not attracted by light, they are attracted by human sweat, so the cleaner you are the better generally, but even freshly bathed a Female Mosquito can still smell you!

In Europe (I have not tested this in the USA, only Europe and Scandinavia) I have found that quality Lavender oil is very good at keeping those little pests at bay if you smear a drop or two everywhere that they can get at you, eg. all exposed skin. Use it sparingly as a) it is expensive b) a small amount still works well. Then a small bottle lasts a year or more. It also smells good.

For sleeping, if you do not have nets for all of your windows (recommended and can be done very cheaply here, black looks best), use a large net that encompasses your bed completely as seen in old films about Africa.......

These fly lights/lamps with a small fluorescent tube behind a wall of high voltage wiring (cost €10 or less here, are excellent and seem to kill most flying insects that invade a house, not just Mosquitoes. They make a very satisfying "SNAP" as the fly is humanely killed by the voltage! Flies seem to fly into a room, unseen by me and make a Beeline (pun intended) to this unit!!! (Though I have never seen a dead Bee in one!!!)

It is also a well known fact that all the "nasty flies" at least, do not like the smell of Lavender and old English cottages used to have a large lavender bush at each corner of the house to keep away unfriendly insects (Bees love Lavender!), no matter from which direction the wind blew, the house was inundated with Lavender scent......

If you do not like the smell, you have a problem, though I suspect that some other plants may have the same effect, I just do not know which ones, sorry!!

For people troubled by Fleas, Lavender oil is well known to keep them at bay too......

Click on this for further infos.....

__________________
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt!"
Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - Scapolie, new member.

Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1058
Good Answers: 8
#8
In reply to #6

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/03/2008 4:58 AM

Hi Andy.

When I lived in Norway I used to rub "Bog Myrtle" leaves over all the exposed skin areas, this keeps all sorts of biting insects away including mosquito's!

Spencer.

Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 14802
Good Answers: 157
#9
In reply to #8

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/03/2008 5:18 AM

Many thanks.

It looks to also be a good tip if you have it growing nearby according to the following website.

__________________
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt!"
Register to Reply
Commentator

Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 98
Good Answers: 2
#19
In reply to #6

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/04/2008 1:36 AM

Andy's comments:

"Firstly, remember that Mosquitoes are not attracted by light, they are attracted by human sweat, so the cleaner you are the better generally, but even freshly bathed a Female Mosquito can still smell you!"

"These fly lights/lamps with a small fluorescent tube behind a wall of high voltage wiring (cost €10 or less here, are excellent and seem to kill most flying insects that invade a house, not just Mosquitoes."

I find these two statements are contradictory. If mosquitoes are not attracted to light, why will they go towards the lamp, certainly not on a suicide mission I think in addition to CO2, mosquitoes like other flies, also get attaracted to light.

Recommedations of `Bog Myrtle' from Scapolie and `100% Deet' (but, what is 10 hour spray?) from Unconventional Solutions are interesting. But I wonder are there really any permanent and reliable silutions for mosquito menace. I have read they have the ability to adapt themselves for new insecticides and drugs. Smart aren't they?

Register to Reply
3
Anonymous Poster
#20
In reply to #19

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/04/2008 7:09 AM

If I may, I think what Andy was trying to get across was that light is not what draws the female insect towards its next meal. That said...a hopefully clarifying word or two about this notion of flying insects being attracted to light.

It could be said in reference to flying insects that the word, attraction, in the sense that nocturnal insects such a moths and mayflies seem to fly towards a lamp or flame, is something of a misnomer. First we recognize that insects (among many other arthropods) are endowed with compound eyes; second, that these eyes are not forward-directed on the head such that (human-like) forward-focusing (and forward object seeking) is possible. Any image perception on one side of the head will not be duplicated on the opposite side...not such that a sensory image of an unseen, foreward objective can be "seen." The compound eye on one side, making non-corresponding, multiple (but different) images of a very broad field of view finds its best capability in the form of motion detection...as light from a moving object (say, a predator) transitions from one eye facet, in some direction, to the next...and so on. The time between a moving object's "focusing" (its being sensed as positioned directly out) by one ommatidium (eye part) and the same occurrence in an adjacent ommatidium would be sensed as a measure (in addition to size) of the (upside-down) object's speed (generally) tangentially to the compound eye. (If the object is approaching, then "focus transitions" to adjacent ommatidia on opposite (or obliquely oriented) sides of an "originally focusing" ommatidium will enable the insect to sense—this is a chemo-mechanical, not a "calculating," process—the size as well as the direction of approach [the rate of looming "growth"] of the object, and react accordingly.) (The same sensory mechanism will go on simultaneously on both sides of the insect's head...with greatest "attention" (greatest reaction predisposition) on the side where greatest threat [greatest motion and size change rate] is sensed.)

If the animal is in level flight, the same visual sensory mechanisms will proceed, except that (from the insect's view point) it will be the environs which are sensed to be in motion, with rate of ommatidia focusing transitions being greater for nearby objects, lesser for more distant objects, in a compound eye's wide visual field...not dissimilar to when, looking out from a moving car, we perceive nearby scenery to pass quickly by the window, more distant objects less quickly, far objects to be virtually stationary...and the entire scene between near and distant seeming to revolve about about a scenery object at sufficient distance so as to be perceived as stationary. Now, let's consider the insect, making its airborne way in conditions of diminished, up to totally occluded (nighttime) "light." As the insect proceeds, maintaining course "bearings" by a distant light source or reflection, we can "see" that that course will be best maintained by flight steering in such a way so as to keep certain ommatidia as focused as possible on the bearing (light) object. If, as is most often the case, that light source is at a great distance (a distant light or celestial object such as moon or star), the insect's flying such that the light is "held" in best "view" among limited, adjacent numbers of ommatidia will result in the insect's course being in a straight line perpendicular to the incident rays from the light source (the same way in which the distant object remains fixed in the center of the car's window over the short term).

Now let us introduce a "sun," in the form of (let's say, an incandescent lamp) into the insect's world view as it flies. If our artificial sun is in close enough proximity, and as the insect "attempts" to keep the sun stationary upon its compound eye's visual field, we can "see" that, without recognizing the fact, insect will no longer be "bearing" on parallel incident rays from the light but, rather, on rays emanating out circularly (in the horizontal plane of globally) about the light. In other words, the insect will be "unknowingly" flying continuous course corrections—flying in a (self determining) straight path which is actually curved. (Were the insect, somehow, to continue on a true straight path (which it "thinks" it is doing because it cannot "know" its incapability of doing so), then, quickly, its navigating eye's ommatidia would detect motion of the light object...would sense that the light object was accelerating towards its rear...[possibly to attack?]....) So, as the insect makes (ostensibly) straight-line course corrections which move it along a curve, the course corrections will have to be ever more frequent and ever more radical, progressively, in order to keep the light object stationary in its field of view; said another way (from the insect's perspective) the light be perceived to move ever faster across its compound eye as it (the light itself) comes closer and closer....so that the insect will progressively increase rate and extent of correction just to keep the light stationary in its view...to prevent the light object's approaching any closer! This programmed-in avoidance action by the insect, to its possible eventual chagrin, will have the opposite of its intended effect: causing the evading insect's path to assume an ever steepening spiral, inwards toward the light. So, we can say that the insect "finds" its way to a non-infinite light source by the very act of flying so as (by its way of reckoning) to not arrive at the light!

Above we have considered, primarily, nocturnal flying insects; those in which motion and light sensitivity are paramount, and sharp focus and color sensitivity would tend to be be extraneous. But, what about diurnal insects; in particular, noxious insects for which bug zappers are thought to be a fitting final destiny? First, to the degree that a nocturnal insect might find itself in proximity to visible light emanating from a zapper, its reaction to the zapper's violet and near ultra-violet "lure" hues would be as described above, provided...provided that, and limited by the extent to which, the nocturnal flier was equipped to perceive in that spectral range. For this reason, it is not nocturnal insects but, rather (for the most part), diurnal insects which are predominantly the intended victims of bug zappers. Unlike nocturnals, diurnals such as dimipterans (flies) are endowed not only with superlative flying "skills," but also, both, with acute focusing and superlative color perception. Because they are active during daylight (including twilight in the case of mosquitoes) their eyes are adapted to permit navigation by sensing light polarization, particularly in the violet and ultra violet, as they view the sky. Similarly to nocturnals, sky navigating insects do not proceed directly but, rather, angularly with respect to polarized UV, which are see-able to them as sky patch patterns in the overhead sky. Now let us place (say) a fly into an environment in which clear view of the sky is limited, and/or in which the light emanating from a zapper is relatively intense relative to other UV sources in the surroundings (it could be indoors, or outdoors under a lowering sky...the time when people might choose to engage in certain outdoor recreational activities but not be disturbed by flying pests). From the fly's perspective...

In similar fashion as we placed an artificial star into the nocturnal's world, we now place an artificial, polarized-UV patch of "sky" into our fly's world. Because it has no choice but to follow the dictates of its eye ommatidia, it finds that as actual sky patches diminish or can't be fully viewed, there's this relatively intense (but, unbenownst to itself, artificial) "sky patch" nearby by which to set and maintain course bearing. Attempting to do so, our hapless fly has no awareness that its world has turned suddenly upside down. It flies about, attempting to navigate by the patch and, in much the same way as the nocturnal, that attempt—that flying, too and fro, in an attempt to align correctly with an overhead (and yet not overhead) sky patch—brings it (and the zapper's lure) in closer and closer proximity...until, at last, the sky patch is so close, but...but not overhead where it belongs (where the eyes "expect" it to be). How then to correct this abnormality with the world...other than to alight on the zappers electrodes in order, following the eyes' mandate, to maneuver the world so that the patch appears overhead, above the eyes, where it should be. Unfortunately for the insect, it has already met its end, before it can step around to the bottom of the electrode to view the patch as it should be viewed.

Why don't bees visit zappers? Unlike flies and such which "forage" for feeding or laying sites by odoer and loosely patterned flight paths, bees are, both, strictly diurnal and strictly goal directed in service to the colony organism. Worker sisters fly in more or less straight lines, and without deviation, away from the hive in search of colors and, when nectar is found and gathered, directly back to offload and make report of findings. When day is done (when sky maps disappear) bees are back within the colony, inactive until daylight makes its next appearance. For the reason that they neither forage at random or by smell (but, rather, by sight), it would be very rare, if ever, that a bee would venture into close proximity to, or otherwise become enraptured by, a zapper.

When it comes to attractions, things aren't always as they seem.

Register to Reply Good Answer (Score 3)
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 14802
Good Answers: 157
#22
In reply to #20

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/04/2008 9:27 AM

GA

Many thanks, I have a) leant a lot here and b) proved that only the Biology Mistress was interesting for me at school!!! Not the subject itself..... Though I would hazard a guess that in th early 60s, most of this was not known anyway!!!

__________________
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt!"
Register to Reply
Anonymous Poster
#26
In reply to #22

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/08/2008 5:00 AM

One measure would be the first advent of zappers—as I recall they first appeared in late '70s and "took off" in the '80s—which must have followed after such knowledge. At the other end... my first exposure as an undergraduate was in the late '60's to early '70s. Typically, a decade or more passes between basic research findings and their incorporation in university undergraduate curricula. So—and your time conjecture seems to be on the mark—it would appear that by the fifties to the mid-to-late '60s the subject was fairly well understood; your time enamoured of the Bio Mistress must have come before or during the aforementioned gap period.

Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 14802
Good Answers: 157
#27
In reply to #26

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/08/2008 2:07 PM

57 to 63.

__________________
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt!"
Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 14802
Good Answers: 157
#21
In reply to #19

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/04/2008 7:21 AM

They certainly were contradictory!! I stuck my head out on that one......!!!

It appears that CO2 lures them in and in some way, the UV light lures them also as plenty end up in the lamp.....as do many other flying pests in the home thank God!!

I sit in the lounge and the "Snap" as another one "bites the dust" can be heard over the TV when both doors are open!!!

__________________
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt!"
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Hemel Hempstead, UK
Posts: 3307
Good Answers: 159
#5

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/03/2008 4:04 AM

This doesn't stop the mosquitoes, but, if you have already been bitten holding a mug of very hot drink against the bite destroys the irritant and stops the itching. You can buy electronic devices which apply a calibrated heat pulse to the bite, but, I've found that a nice hot cup of tea of coffee works OK.

__________________
We are alone in the universe, or, we are not. Either way it's incredible... Adapted from R. Buckminster Fuller/Arthur C. Clarke
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Participant

Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 2
#7

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/03/2008 4:47 AM

I have heard of a good one just this spring. In Ontario now alot of my friends and family are using Listerine (you know, minty mouthwash). I am unsure of the dilution required if any, but you can spray it around your deck, windows and doors and the mosquites will not come anywhere near it. I have not tried this myself as I am in the UK for this summer. But apparently it's great, and cheap too.

Register to Reply
Anonymous Poster
#11
In reply to #7

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/03/2008 6:31 AM

Listerine? Cheap?

I wonder...after the alcohol dissipates, would bees and hummingbirds pay a visit? Better be careful what you wear after a minty Listering sponge bath. Bright colors and Hawaiian shirts are definitely out.

Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Tulare, CA
Posts: 1514
Good Answers: 24
#33
In reply to #11

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/10/2008 12:06 PM

Heck no. No alcohol then why bother with you?

__________________
Why is there never enough time to do it right the first time but always enough time to do it over?
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Tulare, CA
Posts: 1514
Good Answers: 24
#13

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/03/2008 9:37 AM

I'm sure ammonia does help keep more then just mosquitoes away.

I haven't tried it but I did read about it, tying a sheet of Bounce to your belt loop or just have on you when you are out doors repels insects and that includes mosquitoes.

It was Bounce that was specifically mentioned, none of the other brands were brought up.

__________________
Why is there never enough time to do it right the first time but always enough time to do it over?
Register to Reply
Participant

Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 3
#14

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/03/2008 12:52 PM

I am not sure about ammonia to repel mosquitos or other bugs, but ammonia on a mosquito bite will help relieve the itch. Drinking two teaspoons of wine vinegar in an 8 oz glass of water is SUPPOSED to repel mosquitoes, but I have not tried it. I do not know if it would be the vinegar on your breath or from the pores that would repel them. (Mosquitos home in on the CO2 that animals exhale.)

Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Retired Engineers / Mentors - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Brecksville, OH
Posts: 1390
Good Answers: 17
#15

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/03/2008 12:52 PM

I don't know about the ability of ammonia to ward off the attack of mossys, but we have used sudsy ammonia for years to eliminate to irritation of mosquito bites.

__________________
"Stupidity got us into this mess, then why can't it get us out?" : Will Rogers
Register to Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 344
#16
In reply to #15

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/03/2008 5:00 PM

Waooouuhh! You guys have real good advicement here I will try those as you mentioned I do believe they follow lites and CO2 as well then, Hhmmnn ???

Oh Brotherrrss.. Now here I come with another from back off my head idea. But don't laugh at me now.-- "A Co2 detector meter that use mosquito sensorial technology, Wooaahuuhh.. Something new state of the art tool".--You heared here first. Just dont bring it to the bank yet. Holy wacamoolee...Heeheeaauuh..

Just kidding guys brainstorming here a little to share something cool we you all.

You good definetly I will be trying the lemon solution stuff which sounds good for me and thanks all for your nice feedbacks about it.

Barbecue Time,

MC

Register to Reply
Anonymous Poster
#17
In reply to #16

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/03/2008 5:56 PM

... another from back off my head idea. But don't laugh at me now.-- "A Co2 detector meter that use mosquito sensorial technology, Wooaahuuhh.. Something new state of the art tool".--You heared here first.

Probably not first, but not laughable either; just years, if not decades or more, ahead of its time, or feasibility. Even if the chemistry could be figured out, harder still would be...how to do it without the mosquito (and its metabolic processes) "in the loop"—and, given already existing technologies, finding research funding for such a project, in the light of so many, more pressing priorities. Our too-friendly mosquito would not be the only insect process which people have imagined replicating. For example, it has long been known that bees' eyes detect UV dispersion patterns in the sky; and that, without sufficient brain cells, bees can photochemically use those patterns for navigation and location "recall" purposes...even chemically translating food location "sky maps" into waggle dances for the purpose of communicating food foraging locations to sisters in the hive. It is also know or strongly suspected that rodopsin molecules (think, retinal rods) in their compound eyes plays a role. How wondrous it would be if such a process (requiring no computing capability) could be scaled up to, say, airplane size, piloted or unpiloted...or even to the size of a miniature (as in spy) drone! But, so far, and for the foreseeable future (and to the extent that other technology development efforts are more promising), doing this without the bees' genetic blue prints playing a part is far beyond realization in terms of actual hardware. With eventual maturing of nanotechnology, though, who knows...?

Register to Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 344
#28
In reply to #17

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/08/2008 3:13 PM

Lord Is Great..! That's applied hi tech technology for real awesone good feedback. Unbelieavable how such insects survive out there using that technology though very impress with it. WaAouuuh..Thanks for the update by the way to all pal's here on CR-4 definetly, you have the technology my friends..! I know I did read somewhere before about those 'Alaskan Mosquitos' which form like a huge inmense cloud to attack without mercy when that season kick-on, Deeannmmnn... That's will spooky it me out no doubth about it, better not to find out. Alrigth Buddy's pretty interesting theme. I' am using some lemmon juice spray it and Citronella a little bit around and seing so far that it does helping out. Also I' am trying keep those doors close specially at dawn just in case.

Also that Garlic suggestion will be great specially the --Garlic with Bread Spread-- will be nice stuff in the same time as a back-up to reinforce repellants effects.

All Set Buddy's I'll let ya' go for the moment and enjoy very nice the rest of the weekend now. It's getting little way too hot around here so keep it cool now...

Where's That Beer,

MC

Register to Reply
Guru
Safety - ESD - New Member Popular Science - Cosmology - Amateur Astronomer Technical Fields - Technical Writing - Writer India - Member - Regular CR4 participant Engineering Fields - Optical Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: 18 29 N 73 57E
Posts: 1363
Good Answers: 31
#29
In reply to #15

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/08/2008 11:27 PM

Simple Onion also works, not only on mosquito bite but also a honey bee bite.

Register to Reply
Member

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Milford, Michigan, USA
Posts: 6
#18

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/03/2008 10:27 PM

As a runner, and mountain biker I find nothing works better than our 10 hour spray with 100% deet.

__________________
USI leading the Mid West...for innovative 3M Abrasion, Chemical and Corrosion Protection Solutions
Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - bwire Hobbies - Car Customizing - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Upper Mid-west USA
Posts: 7552
Good Answers: 98
#23
In reply to #18

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/07/2008 3:30 PM

An apple a day may keep the Dr. away but a clove garlic a day keeps all else at bay.

__________________
If death came with a warning there would be a whole lot less of it.
Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 14802
Good Answers: 157
#24
In reply to #23

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/07/2008 6:33 PM

Garlic being a very "Healthy" if smelly thing to eat, my wife and I decided years ago if one was eating something loaded with garlic and the other was not, the one who had the garlicky menu would offer the other a fork full or so. This meant that neither could smell the other as they both smelt the same!!!

I remember once being in a deep sleep and being woken up by my wife's "Dragon" breath after she had been out with the girls to an Italian restaurant!!! Phew!!!

We have also found out that a glass of Racki or Ouzo, washes away 95% of the smell if drunk after the meal (after driving a car too!!)......

People of 50 or older, should eat garlic regularly as it helps keep the blood flowing to all parts of the body!!!!

__________________
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt!"
Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - bwire Hobbies - Car Customizing - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Upper Mid-west USA
Posts: 7552
Good Answers: 98
#25
In reply to #24

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/07/2008 7:09 PM

People of 50 or older, should eat garlic regularly as it helps keep the blood flowing to all parts of the body!!!!

Yeper go with the flow

__________________
If death came with a warning there would be a whole lot less of it.
Register to Reply
Guru
Safety - ESD - New Member Popular Science - Cosmology - Amateur Astronomer Technical Fields - Technical Writing - Writer India - Member - Regular CR4 participant Engineering Fields - Optical Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: 18 29 N 73 57E
Posts: 1363
Good Answers: 31
#39
In reply to #23

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/06/2011 12:23 AM

An apple a day.... Do wives of doctors do not eat apples?

Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 14802
Good Answers: 157
#30

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/09/2008 2:55 AM

Everyone has talked about Mosquitoes here, but nobody has mentioned "Midges" as the Scots call them.

I believe I am also correct in saying that the Norwegians and the Swedes (Swedish "mygg" is actually a Mosquito) call them "knott".

N.Americans & Canadians call them "No-see-ums" or "Punkies" I am led to believe by this Midge web site.

Germany/Austria has several names, among which are the Gnitze, the kleine Mücke, the Gelse (Österr.)and the Stechmücke.

What the Finns, Russians & Chinese call them I haven't a clue....perhaps you Guys can clear up this point for me!!!

I find these to be worse than Mosquitoes as Midges always bite in their millions!

An old Scottish is saying is that "you should not kill one as then Billions come to the Funeral!!!"

They are very tiny, difficult to see in any light, are still active in the day and the red marks they leave take at least 10 days to stop itching!!!

I personally have not found anything that stops them 100% of the time, but until that special agent comes along, Lavender Oil is pretty good......any tips in that area will also be gratefully received.

In Scotland they start to be active by the end of July and stay active through to the end of September, depending upon weather and temperatures.

They are responsible for some serious animal diseases in Bovines (Blue Tongue) and several other complaints/allergies in various other species including humans!!!

__________________
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt!"
Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - bwire Hobbies - Car Customizing - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Upper Mid-west USA
Posts: 7552
Good Answers: 98
#32
In reply to #30

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/10/2008 12:02 PM

I personally have not found anything that stops them 100% of the time, but until that special agent comes along, Lavender Oil is pretty good......any tips in that area will also be gratefully received.

Hello Andy, I use coconut oil all the time and now that you mention it I don't have trouble from bloodsuckers of any kind. I suppose they aren't attracted to coconuts.

Marigold flowers ground seem to deter most insects. Some folks have grown them about their homes and acreages for generations and those folks aren't bothered by a host of pests.

Albeit chiggers and midges are different here is a list of substances known to be effective repellents:

DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide)

Essential oil of the lemon eucalyptus and its active ingredient p-menthane-3,8-diol (PMD)

  • Icaridin, also known as picaridin, Bayrepel, and KBR 3023
  • Nepetalactone, also known as "catnip oil"
  • Citronella oil
  • Permethrin
  • Products containing permethrin Products containing 0.5% permethrin:
    • Bonide Ant Dust (0.25%)
    • Rentokil woodworm Killer 1.8% w/w
    • Most flea and tick repellant for dogs (Adams, Bio-Spot, K9-Advantix, Cutter)
    • Dragnet, a pesticide for home use, also contains permethrin.
    • Raid Ant and Roach killer, another home insecticide contains 0.2% permethrin.
    • Cutter Bug Free Backyard contains 2.5% permethrin
  • Carbaryl (1-naphthyl methylcarbamate) commonly sold under the brand name Sevin, a trademark of the Bayer Company
  • Neem oil Formulations made of Neem oil also find wide usage as a bio-pesticide for organic farming, as it repels a wide variety of pests including the mealy bug, beet armyworm, aphids, the cabbage worm, nematodes and the Japanese beetle. Neem Oil is not known to be harmful to mammals and birds as well as many beneficial insects such as honeybees and ladybugs. It can be used as a household pesticide for ant, bedbug, cockroach, housefly, sand fly, snail, termite and mosquitoes both as repellent and larvicide (Puri 1999). I have used DEET, PMD, Icardin, Carbaryl (sevin) and coconut oil with good results
__________________
If death came with a warning there would be a whole lot less of it.
Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 14802
Good Answers: 157
#34
In reply to #32

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/10/2008 12:13 PM

Thanks for the huge amount of data on this subject, I will definitely try the Coconut oil as it is far cheaper here than lavender oil and sounds as though it may work even better!

__________________
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt!"
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Tulare, CA
Posts: 1514
Good Answers: 24
#35
In reply to #32

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/10/2008 12:25 PM

What temperature do we set to the oven and does it need to be preheated and for how long?

__________________
Why is there never enough time to do it right the first time but always enough time to do it over?
Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - bwire Hobbies - Car Customizing - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Upper Mid-west USA
Posts: 7552
Good Answers: 98
#36
In reply to #35

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/10/2008 12:41 PM

It is personal preference I suppose...

__________________
If death came with a warning there would be a whole lot less of it.
Register to Reply
Power-User
Canada - Member -

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 438
Good Answers: 4
#31

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/10/2008 10:58 AM

Try this and let us know if that works....

__________________
Handle every stressful situation like a dog. If you can't eat it or play with it, just pee on it and walk away. - unknown.
Register to Reply
Anonymous Poster
#37

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/24/2010 3:07 AM

Ammonia is poison. Do not play with it!

http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/mhmi/mmg126.html

Register to Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: lat. 40N lon. 124W
Posts: 364
Good Answers: 5
#38

Re: A Little Ammonia to Repel Mosquitos...?

06/24/2010 10:07 AM

hello everyone;

i just ran across this link. great stuff. this is one of my favorite subjects. most of the replies are very correct. the biggest suggestion is for the comments about midges. what i would try is what is used in the south for "biting flies". that would be a small amount of "real Vanilla" in olive oil. the local kids use it to play in the creeks.

as for the mosquito's: most are correct. the only thing that people seem to be missing is what i consider fact: that mosquito's are hardwired for the smell of CO2. therefore anything you can use that masks the smell of CO2 makes you invisible to them. this is why so many things work. my personal favorite is a small amount of imitation vanilla in water. sprayed heavily on all exposed skin and clothings. works good if enough is sprayed on, plus you smell good. another plus, most people are not allergic to vanilla.

i make my own mosquito repellents and sell them at festivals and such. the list of ingredients that i use matches with ALL of the recommendations here. i have found that essential oils of these things diluted in Grape seed oil is the cheapest and most effective. in 2 ounces of grape seed oil i will put up to 10 or 12 drops of various essential oils. gives different scents that appeal to different people. they all work. the most effective essential oil and the most expensive is catnip oil.

for after being bitten i use: boiled pennyroyal. extremely effective. takes away the sting of most bites. i even used it personally,on a wasp sting and the pain went away immediately.

__________________
“There is always an easy solution to every human problem — neat, plausible and wrong.” H. L. Mencken……………………. that's Conventional Wisdom for you. Often wrong, but never in doubt.
Register to Reply
Register to Reply 39 comments
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Comments rated to be Good Answers:

These comments received enough positive ratings to make them "good answers".
Copy to Clipboard

Users who posted comments:

agua_doc (1); Andy Germany (8); Anonymous Poster (8); artbyjoe (1); bwire (4); electrone (1); gsuhas (2); Humble Ess (2); Janissaries (3); magwer (2); Mr. Truman Brain (1); NickG (1); Randall (1); Rick@cae (1); Scapolie (1); The Thinker (1); Unconventional Solutions (1)

Previous in Forum: Removal of Organic contaminents from activated carbon powder   Next in Forum: Toomuchfun/crude pricing under fire

Advertisement