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Can a car alternator generate 110v?

02/21/2009 8:41 AM

Does anyone know if a standard car alternator can be used, or modified, to generate a 110 v output? Does the output voltage depend on the rotational speed?

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#1

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

02/21/2009 11:34 AM

It can, and is routinely done with a variety of commercially available power inverters.

Google "power inverters" or "dc to ac converters" for some ideas.

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#2
In reply to #1

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

02/21/2009 11:56 AM

Thanks. Will do.

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#3

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

02/21/2009 11:59 AM

Yes, you can generate 110 VAC with a modified car alternator, and yes the output depends upon rotational speed (as well as upon field strength). The field coil in an alternator is fed with DC, and the regulator varies the strength of the field coil. To produce AC, you will need a source of DC current to initially energize the field coil (after which a portion of the the alternator's output can be rectified and used to feed the field).

The alternator will output 3 phase current, at a frequency depending upon alternator speed. This three phase current might not be usable for your purposes. It will not, for example, run a typical single phase induction motor (unless you use only one phase of the three phase output).

If you are looking for a source of ordinary 110VAC at 60 hz, then you could do what Honda (and others) have done with their inverter generators. In these generators, the generator output is DC (rectified from AC just as it is in a car alternator) which is then run through an inverter to produce stable AC that is independent of engine speed. Therefore, in these generators, the engine can be slowed down when the load is light, without affecting the frequency of the output.

This thread may give you some ideas.

If the alternator is installed in a car, then the simple way to get 110VAC is with an inverter, which are available in many output levels. With these, the battery can be the power source, so the engine need not be running (but of course, you cannot run for long on the battery alone).

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#4
In reply to #3

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

02/21/2009 12:55 PM

Thanks so much for the information.

In fact I do want DC for the main purpose in mind - charging a series of batteries. The "110v." may have been a little misleading, but I have a secondary application in mind for this, which is powering standard light bulbs. As fas as I know, there is no reason why 110v DC won't produce the same result as 110v. AC for this application.

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#5
In reply to #4

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

02/22/2009 4:47 AM

That being your answer, the answer to your original questions NO.

In the first place the PIV rating of your internal diodes is about 25V or maybe even less.

Secondly as the voltage goes up the possible current has to go down or you will fry something. As Blink mentioned, you can push the field current slightly higher but you will burn out the stator windings in short order. Been there and seen the result from some dumb mechanics full fielding a 24V alternator.

Some companies offer special conversion kits to deliver 120V from a 12V alternator. We tried some with varying degreees of sucess. for light bulbs it might be okay since they are resistive.

Just remember, there is no free lunch and the laws of energy conservation must be observed. Why would you even try? If it was that easy everybody would already be doing it. If you need 120V AC or DC use the right inverter to do the job.

And if you are trying to charge a 120V DC battery system, be careful. Its very easy to blow your battery bank from using incorrect voltage levels. It then becomes an expensive mistake.

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#7
In reply to #5

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

02/22/2009 1:44 PM

Thank you for your answer. You ask "Why would you even try?" I am trying to do this cheaply at first and so hoped to use a used car alternator, modified if necessary, to give a higher voltage output (lower current understood) than the standard "12v" (which must in fact be more like 16v in order to charge a 12v battery at a reasonable rate.) From what you say, I would need, at least, to change the diodes to a much higher PIV.

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#8
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Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

02/22/2009 6:40 PM

I guessed as much. However by the time you fiddle around with modifications, buy the necessary parts, you will have spent as much as if you had bought the specialty item in the firt place. Ebay is a wonderful shopping place with good prices and even some great bargains from time to time.

One time we needed a 3 phase power source. I set up a self excitable 70A alternator in a lathe that could spin up the rotor to 5000 RPM or so. Since we wanted as much voltage as posible we removed the diode block. At full speed we actually measured 90 Volts RMS across any one phase to ground. But the minute we loaded up the alternator the voltage quickly sagged to around 45 V at 5 amps.

On another occasion I had to check an installation in which a brand new 12V alternator apparently put out 28V (unloaded)but it would not charge the battery bank.

Turns out the ground cable between the alternator and battery was missing. Or rather, the cable was visible but connected to an isolated ground point. Not the battery.

I have a number of 12V alternators on hand and half a dozen expensive 3 stage regulators - all of which are 24V. Remembering the episode of the errant 28v unit I called the manufacturer up to ask if I could "fudge" a setup to deliver 24V using the 24V regulator and a 12V alternator. Both units were in fact their own units. The answer was. No!

On another installation I was called in after the mechanics had burned out three expensive 200 Amp unit. The boat builder wanted an expert to assist before his crew burned out yet another $1000 alternator.

Eventually I was able to determine that the cause was from overloading the alternator at low RPM which caused the regulator to full field the unit when the system voltage drooped. My point being if you full field any alternator, you will not get higher voltage, but more current and eventually you melt the stator wires.

And that in turn leads to the last relevant point. If you somehow manage to raise the voltage; how do you plan to regulate it? Forget the stock regulator. It will cut back the field as it sees the voltage rise above max limits. Even if you put 300V PIV diodes in place, you still need a regulator. After spending $120 for six diodes at $20 apiece ( wholesale) you now face the expense and or time to jerry rig a new regulator. What do you value your own time at? $1 per hour $2/ hr or maybe a high roller at $5/hr.

If you were smart enough to be capable of designing and building your own regulator in less than 100 hours of time; we would not be having this conversation. You would already know the answer to your own question. So now we add at least $100 if not more for a special regulator.( not counting parts)

At one place I worked, we bought one of these 120V AC from 12V DC alternator conversionm kits. After several months of experimentation, not to mention test failures, the engineering tech ended up buying a Honda generator for $250 for an 800 wat unit. That was enough for our needs. These days we would buy an inverter for less money.

We found the stability and regulation to be poor. We burnt out a few fuses. The down time was always most inconvenient. Need I go on?

Like I said, if it was that easy somebody else would already have done it.

There is one way. Strip out the diode block. convert it to a terminal block for wire connections. Bring out the 3 phase AC wiring to this block. Feed the AC output to a transformer. Remember now, this has to be a 3 phase transformer and it must be capable of much higher frequency than your ordinary household 60 Hz types. might find one military surplus.

The transformer will boost the 10 - 20 volts to somewhere around 150 - 170V AC at varying frequency depending on your motor speed. And before the rectifier block.

Only way to stabilize the frequency to a fixed number is to mount this alternator on a dedicated and seperate motor running at a constant speed.

But wait, your regulator is not going to work with an AC output. So its back to the drawing board to cobble togetehr a regulator that does work on AC. Sound familiar?

I built one of these last year. Had the regulator and alternator on hand so call it free. Otherwise plan on spending $600. Bought the motor for $200. But the darn pulleys, mtg. brackets, hinges, belt and assorted nuts and bolts set me back another $100 at my local hardware shop.

There you have it!

Now make a liar out of me and show us how to do it for under $100 total cost. I would love to know how! If I could, I have sales for 10 units right away. More if I advertise.

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#10
In reply to #8

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

02/22/2009 11:37 PM

Thank you so much for your lengthy and interesting input! Now you've got me all depressed. The reason I was interested in using a modified car alternator was low cost (hopefully), compact, light weight. But maybe I'm asking too much. I've trolled eBay for alternators and generators and have found some apparently suitable ones, until I see that they are "stationary" types and extremely heavy.

In my projected application, the "generator" would be driven at a constant speed, so I don't know how important a voltage regulator will be.

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#13
In reply to #10

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

02/23/2009 12:45 AM

Lets look at your most critical application first. Battery charging. Depending on what stage of charging you are at, even half a volt is critical and can mean the difference betwen life and destruction for the battery. If you have a good sysem for 12V DC, it most likely is not going to be suitable for 120V Lights.

If you optimize for a 120V output, no matter if its AC or DC, you have a regulator problem. So why even go there?

What dictates the need for 120V lights? There are so many other options for illumination using 12V DC. And if your primary need is for 12V charging you already have a good system. Use it! Don't mess with somethin that ain't broken.

If you are doing something else that is different, it would help if we knew exactly what your design goals are. Chances are somebody has already tried that and possibly even been sucesful at it.

So let try this again.

What battery voltage system are you using?

What battery capacity do you need? This is critical in choosing an alternator.

How much illumination do you need and for how long? This also determine battey size.

As regards a constant running engine. Even if your RPMs are constant, the voltage output of the alternator will vary acording to loading unless you have a good regulator.

Although you haven't said so, the implication is you are thinking of some kind of bulk storage of electrical energy. Have you done any kind of load calculation. Do you know how much energy you need?

Automotive alternators and automotive batteries are among the least desirable itme for such a system. Several manufacturers have developed much better hardware that is optimized for such tasks.

Wiring multiple automotive start batteries into a bank wil create a huge charging load on any automotive alternator. Most likely it wil soon overload and then overheat. This leads to premature failure due to burnt windings or diodes.

Except for big truck sized alternators, almost all automotive units are designed for intermittent duty or light charge current except for the imitial surge.

I see you keep ducking the issue of getting an inverter. Why? This is the single most effective way of dealing with such systems. If a couple of hundred bucks is going to make or break this project; you are over extended. don't even start. You will waste what little money you put into the project by cobbling mis fit auto parts together.

Yes you can cobble a lawnmower engine to a scrapped car alternator and charge a typical car battery of maybe 80 amp hours capacity. For more capacity you can wire multiples together in parallel. But the longer charging time wil most likely over heat your alternator.

That setup will get you a DC charging plant that can deliver about 50 Amp DC for maybe 5 hours at a stretch. Go for higher charge rate and you need to shut down sooner due to over heating of diodes or windings.

So 50 amps for 5 hours = 250 amp hour charge to be stored. This is what a typical household uses in a 24 hour period if they live off an inverter. Assuming you collect enough scrap car batteries, you still have the issue of deep cycling these start batterie. They do not like that. Brand new car batteries subjected to deep cycling will not last a year.

Used car batteries from the scrap dealer will last a couple of months in most cases.

If you want reliable and longer lasting battery storage, you need deep cycle batteries. these are NOT cheap! Unit prices (whole sale) runs me several hundred bucks apiece.

But lets look at your constant RPM driven alternator. Unless you have a hydraulic water source that runs 24/7 it isn't going to be free. In fact; with a lawn mower engine and a single stage regulated alternator, you have what is probably the least efficient generator going. What money you think you saved getting cheap automotive parts is going to be extracted from your pocket in expensive fuel burned by this wasteful contraption.

If you spend the money up front for a system using purpose made equipment you will save the cost of the system in a year or less by making better use of the fuel burned.

If you are thinking of a water or wind powered system, keep in mind that automotive alternators are designed to be spun at around 5000 RPM to deliver heir rated output. Any slower means less output. And the necessary gear box for a speed increaser is going to cost you plenty.

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#17
In reply to #13

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

02/23/2009 11:30 AM

You are going off on a wild tangent of your own making! Let's return to the basic question (forget about light bulbs for now): Can I modify an automotive alternator (doesn't have to be car type, could be from a large truck) to supply a voltage (DC), perhaps up to 120v. (nice round figure)? I appreciate that such a device is limited to a certain maximum kW output and therefore I will have much less current to play with. That's OK.

I am not prepared to divulge any more information about the "engine" to drive the alternator or the overall application. Must keep some secrets to myself. Sorry!

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#18
In reply to #17

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

02/23/2009 2:19 PM

Hi energyconversion,

Here's a link to a booklet that will give you the info you need. A car or truck alternator will work.

Also, a permanent magnet dc motor, if it was originally intended to run on about 120 volts, will work as a generator. These are available surplus from treadmills. (A permanent magnet motor has a fixed relationship between speed and voltage, so that if a motor is designed for let's say 24 volts, you would have to run it at 5 times normal speed to get 120 volts out of it -- at such a speed it is likely that the motor will spontaneously disassemble.)

(Permanent magnet motors and generators are essentially the same thing, BTW.)

With a permanent magnet motor like the one linked, you could run universal motors (like those in many power tools) light bulbs, heaters and possibly heater blowers, and maybe even some types of switch mode power supplies like cell phone chargers (although you'd have to experiment, maybe while wearing safety glasses.) With something to control the motor's speed, you could use it to charge a string of nine 12 v batteries -- maybe even 10, with a little overspeed. The advantage of a PM DC motor is that no diodes are required to get a DC output*. The disadvantage is that it has brushes that wear out more quickly than those in an alternator. The fact that output varies with speed can be either an advantage or disadvantage.

* For battery charging, you'd probably still want to use diodes to keep the batteries from driving the motor, and you'd want to make sure your voltage regulation scheme worked automatically.

Remember that there are all sorts of possibilities for sparks, explosions, electrocutions, burns, fires, etc.

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#19
In reply to #18

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

02/25/2009 8:49 PM

Blink; good answer!!! talk about B.S. we built gen sets 110 volts dc years ago, found out some power tools had the trigger do a SCR, would't stop when you let go of trigger i like your secrets, that should re inform some readers, we mfg a 5 phase, with 11 diodes generator, adjustable from 6 to 48 volts D.C., used a mag amp, now i see them on the surplus market, hang in there with good answers. perry, minneapolis

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#23
In reply to #19

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

02/26/2009 5:37 PM

Thanks for the compliment. The SCR tools would be one of those things where you say "What the ..." and then think for a minute.

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#20
In reply to #18

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

02/25/2009 11:43 PM

Thank you Blink for your valuable input - very useful.

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#22
In reply to #20

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

02/26/2009 5:14 PM

You're welcome. I hope it helps.

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#31
In reply to #7

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

08/30/2009 8:17 AM

you probably cant span the alternator fast enough t have it generate 120 volts directly. And even if you did replace the dioes, youd have 120v *DC*, not the same as 120v AC house current. You'd want to *remove* the diodes so you have AC, then use a transformer to step the voltage up. Transformers dont work with DC.

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#30
In reply to #5

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

08/30/2009 8:15 AM

If you can remove/bypass the diodes and get AC, then a 10x step up transformer can easily take your 12vac and make it 120vac. The only tricky part will be the frequency - either you have to tune the engine speed to get your 60hz, or run only devices that arent dependent on their input being exactly 60hz - light bulbs and electric heaters would probably run fine. Motors, or anything that uses a motor (fridge, fans, heat blower) or anything with electronics (microwave, tv, etc) probably would be unhappy if it was too far off.

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#32
In reply to #3

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

03/15/2010 4:25 PM

I believe if u take out the voltage regulator and the diode bridge rectifier the spinning alternator will produce a.c. then u'd need a volt meter to spin it to the right rpm to get 110 a.c., and i'm not sure but I don't think u need the battery, the magnets spinning across the fields should produce the a.c. by themselves ,whenever a magnet passes by a field coil it produces electricity try it on an old alternator 1st but I'm pretty sure that's what my dad told me years ago Hope this helps I'll dig out an old alt. and try it and let u all know how it worked. Bambam55

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#33
In reply to #3

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

03/15/2010 6:37 PM

I believe that if you hook 1 side of the 1st field coil wires to the 2nd then the other side to the 3rd field coil u should have two wires not hooked up to anything one side will be 1 side of ur a.c. loop and the other side will be the other side of ur a.c.loop. hooked up in series u should get a constant a.c. voltage just need a volt meter to check the voltage to get to 110v at the right r.p.m. and I don't think u need to charge the coils with 12 volts. as when the magnets spin by the field coil cores they should cause an electrical charge which at the correct r.p.m.should make 110 v. sorry I got ahead of my self you need to take the volt. reg. and the diodes out the wires where the diodes, were, is where you hook the wires up in series from the field coils

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#6

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

02/22/2009 5:12 AM

Hi, There are several comercially produced vehicle alternators which have been modified to give 110V (or 220V) as an output. As this is engine speed dependant for the frequency they usually pass through an inverter to gain the 60 or 50Hz. The problem they suffer from is that when an high load is switched on they tend to slip the belt drive as the load is directly relayed back through the inverter to the alternator.

Far better is to use a solid state inverter from your battery and add a "smart regulator" to your alternator to improve its output. This way the alternator is still producing the power you want but it is buffered by the energy stored in the battery

DON'T be tempted to "Full field" your alternator or use some type of manual control as you will at some point forget to control it and it will ruin your battery.

As you are probably in the USA I suggest going to http://www.amplepower.com/products/sarv3/index.html

Battery temperature sensing is important as the smart reg is charging the battery nearer the limit, and that limit is very temperature dependant.

regards

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#9
In reply to #6

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

02/22/2009 7:03 PM

Energy Conversion wrote:

I want DC for the main purpose in mind - charging a series of batteries. The "110v." may have been a little misleading, but I have a secondary application in mind for this, which is powering standard light bulbs. As fas as I know, there is no reason why 110v DC won't produce the same result as 110v. AC for this application.

REPLY

Are you talking 12V batteries or a battery bank of 110V - 120V. This high voltage being the new popular voltage for electric propulsion use.

"powering standard light bulbs" Which standard?

Many standard household bulbs of the halogen variety are actually 12V. The fixtuer contains a small step down transformer. If the common garden variety 120V bulbs is intended; why this size? Many countries plan on banning sale of these tungsten filament bulbs by year 2010 - 2012. Instead, consumer will be forced to buy CCF or flourescent bulbs. These are somewhat finicky as to stable voltage and frequency.

Your name "energyconversion" implies an interest or activity in some kind of energy efficient project. Why would you then pick the least efficient and soon to be banned light bulb type?

Your desire to find a cheap way using automotive parts suggest you are hopeful you will find a free lunch rather than a technically elegant and efficient solution.

Even the automotive world is talking about getting away from the inefficient 12V systems. Designs have been debuted using 24V or 36V and even 48V systems in the interest of gaining better efficiencies. All new off-grid home installations now offer 48V system options. so why stick with 12V?

Some digging in CR4 archives will uncover countless threads on this subject.

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#12
In reply to #9

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

02/23/2009 12:08 AM

I used the moniker "energyconversion" because I used to be a research electrochemist working on hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells. In fact the company I worked for, was Energy Conversion Ltd. This was decades ago. At the time, we thought the fuel cell powered car was "just around the corner." Some corner. I have also been involved in heat pumps (UK) and solar power (USA), but always prior to crashes in the price of oil destroying the whole rationale for the products. Sound familiar? It's happening again. The rest of my career has been in spectroscopy - x-ray, IR, optical emission & nuclear magnetic resonance, but energy has always been my passion.

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#14
In reply to #12

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

02/23/2009 12:59 AM

Okay now it bgins to make sense. Lets start from the other end. What energy source do you have available? Wind? water? solar? If solar, you have a choice of thermal and photonic.

What limitations of any do you have as to the method of converting these energy sources into stored enrgy.?

Do you have even an approximate energy budget?

Have you already gone through the exercise of reducing consumption and/or optimizing your usage?

Unless you use some kind of energy storage you will be subjecting your power source to a varying load with huge peaks and valleys in the demand curve. None of the rotary power sources like this kind of behaviour.

The storage method and conversion equipment will smooth out the peaks and buffer your rotary source. The question now becomes which one of several options best applies to your particular situation.

That in turn may determine the most likely path to sucess.

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#35
In reply to #12

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

09/11/2012 11:05 AM

Sounds like an interesting career path...

I've been trying to get my head round hydrogen fuel cell technology but it's not exactly in my field so I'm coming at it as a bit of a layman. I found an interesting mention of it here: http://www.topengineeringjobs.com/article/5591/future-developments-in-electrical-engineering/ but it mainly just touched on the process as part of an overview of electrical developments. Quite an interesting general interest article, but not technical enough for my purposes...

Even if it's a long way in the future, I'd really like to understand the process if/when it arrives.

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#11
In reply to #6

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

02/22/2009 11:39 PM

Thanks for your valuable input!

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#15

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

02/23/2009 10:36 AM

energyconversion; i've never seen so much mis information/bs in my life. perry

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#16
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Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

02/23/2009 11:13 AM

Oops! Sounds like you beg to differ.

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#21
In reply to #16

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

02/26/2009 11:17 AM

energyconversion; NO, a lot of people replying don't know what their taking about, one said the diodes were rated 25 volts, car mfg wanted minimum 0f 60 volts,more like 200 PIV. The other guy said the higher the voltage, the lower the amps output, if it puts out 40 amps, it will put out 40 amps at 120 volts, with rated field/rotor voltage, increasing RPM increases voltage out. we built several stick welders out of car alternators using a heavy duty reactor in series with the output. perry

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#24
In reply to #21

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

03/04/2009 9:46 AM

You are absolutely correct. The persons who disagree need to put the theory to test as the results are basic. the current handled is dependent on the size wire and the voltage handling capacity is dependent on the insulation of the copper wire which remains fairly constant for high and low voltage requirement.

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#25
In reply to #24

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

03/04/2009 10:59 AM

According to one manufacturer (Balmar) of high output alternators you cannot double the voltage and deliver same current since this is now double the wattage. The alternator will overheat after a while. It may deliver higher power for a short while but sustained 24/7 output, no way!

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#26
In reply to #25

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

03/05/2009 7:40 AM

guest; you are right for continues load, the person spoke of charging batteries, as they get to charged the charging current drops off, if you are using it for arc welder you stop to replace the welding rod, & check set up or more material. usually if you double the voltage on a resistive load you double the current for four times the wattage. perry

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#27
In reply to #26

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

03/05/2009 1:05 PM

The OP has a user name that suggest alternative energy project and possibly a continued energy source based on a car alternator. Is that practical?

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#28

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

04/08/2009 2:05 AM

I don't know if you ever found your answer to this ...I was just searching for some general info about alternator excitation for an emergency exercise bike that I am putting an alternator on and found you. In answer to your question...I have ran many 110v tools on a car alternator. I used an older external regulated ford on a ford truck that I used to own. If you disconnect toe battery wire from the alternator, leave the exciter wire connected to feed the field 12v and connect your 110v outlet to ground and the alternator battery post, you will get an output varying up to about 150v "DC" at about 2500 RPM. DC power will run any resistance load (light bulb, heating element etc.) and also will run AC/DC power tools (most any motor with brushes in it). I am an electrician and used to use this to run my Milwaukee Hole Hawg drill and sawsall at remote cabin jobs when needed. I used a continuous duty 12v solenoid (from auto parts store) to disconnect the battery wire from the alternator, when I wanted the 110v. and wired two 110v outlets in the bed of the truck with #10 wire (hot and ground)... (neutral). When the solenoid is turned on with a toggle switch, the outlets get 110v when it's off they get 12v...who cares. Slight caution! the field of the alternator is draining your battery when this is running 110v and NOT charging your battery....Turn it off when you don't need it and let you car run to charge your battery for a while so you don't get stranded. Internal reg alternator you may need to do something with the regulator....haven't tried but I know it could be done. Hope this helps you. Roger

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#29
In reply to #28

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

04/08/2009 12:19 PM

Thank you for your very valuable input!

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#34

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

09/26/2010 1:11 AM

I worked for a school in New Mexico. They had a welder that was powered by a v8 chevy engine. Mounted on the alternator was a common electrical box with with a receptacle, 12 volt fuse holder and a toggle switch. I built a set of hand rails for the school using the welder, and when in need used a grinder to smooth out rough welds. The grinder ran off the alternator when the toggle switch was in the 120 volt position, when not in use it was switched back to the 12 volt position. I thought that it would be good to have a system like this for myself and bought one. I recently found it again, but the wiring instructions were no longer with the box. The directions were varied for Ford, Chrysler, and Chevrolet. When I get back to New Mexico, in October, I will scour through my files and hopefully find them for I too have a project in mind.

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#36

Re: Can a car alternator generate 110v?

07/14/2014 12:24 AM

The answer is yes to 110 Volts DC and NO to AC, (Alternating Current), which you did not specify but probably assumed. The method is easy on alternators that have an external voltage regulator, more difficult on alternators that have internal voltage regulators or single wire systems. The NAME Alternator is correct in that they do produce an alternating current internally; however, this was always internally rectified with diodes so that no AC was ever produced externally, only DC Voltage.

AC-DC? Any electronic device that has any internal transformer or coil will require AC power for the transformer(s) and voltage coils, they will NOT work on DC,(Direct Current). Since AC invertors are so inexpensive, it is not common to need to rig an alternator to output 110 Volts DC as well as there are safety concerns which is the reason the voltage regulators were later designed as Internal Integrated Circuits in vehicles after the mid 1970's.

I used to have a 1967 Ford Galaxy Wagon in which I installed a 110 Volt bypass switch and sockets. I still have a Kit which I never installed on any vehicle, though it is basically a switch that bypassed the voltage regulator and allowed the voltage to rise to 90-130 volts at engine idle speeds so it is somewhat dependent upon RPM but not nearly to the extent that generators are. Since the alternator field uses power from the 12 Volt battery, it was not something that could be used for an indefinite period of time without draining the battery as it is not being re-charged when the output is switched to 110 Volts DC.

This power could be used to run everything from a lights, hand drills, anything with brush armature motors such as vacuum cleaners, mixers, blenders, and anything that used it only to heat an element like older toasters, heaters, coffee Makers, Crock Pots etc.. NO 110 VOLT CD PLAYERS, RADIOS, NOR MOST MODERN ELECTRONICS.

I have seen conversions for alternators such as was used by Stan and Steve Meyer in HHO production and have no doubt that better production can be had by the use of Higher Voltage without as much heat generation loss; however, they were also controlling the DC High Voltage with a chopping frequency. I have also seen where an 110 Volt Inverter was coupled directly with the Coil Spark to create a plasma arc where even a small amount of hydrogen fusion/fission may have been taking place inside the injector/cylinder when the natural occurring Deuterium, (Heavy Water Ions), were directed into the plasma stream during the combustion stroke. Frankly, if there is any energy gain to be had in using water or HHO as a fuel; it would need to occur at the atomic level, rather than the chemical level, whether it is "Cold Fusion" occurring within the electrode surface boundaries within the HHO Cell or Fission/Fusion occurring within the spark plasma stream.

If you cannot find the alternator High Voltage Conversions doing a search on the internet, (they change out the 12 Volt field coils with Permanent Magnetic fields so that no voltage is required to activate the field) and output is true AC. You could let me know and I could send you some links. Remember this; the reason why the voltage regulators were made internal to the alternator after the mid 1970's, was that high voltage on the exterior contacts of the alternators was too dangerous.

These folks support HHO Production products; I am in no way endorsing them nor the ideas commonly found in HHO production circles, as most are merely scams in my opinion.

http://www.thehydrogenshop.com/index.html

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