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Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Tiruchirapalli Tamil Nadu India
Posts: 56
Good Answers: 3

Air Flow Measurement Using an Airfoil

06/30/2009 7:45 AM

I wish to know the formula of air flow measurement using an airfoil. The airfoil axis is vertical. The airfoil is symmetricaland static.
Thank you

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Pathfinder Tags: Airfoil flow measurement
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Guru
United Kingdom - Member - Indeterminate Engineering Fields - Control Engineering - New Member

Join Date: Jan 2007
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#1

Re: Narendra

06/30/2009 8:08 AM

Perry, "The Chemical Engineer's Handbook", any edition.

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Guru

Join Date: Aug 2006
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#2

Re: Air Flow Measurement Using an Airfoil

07/01/2009 12:07 PM

With a little experimentation or estimation, you can determine the effect of angle of attack on lift. (Generally, for a symmetric airfoil, the CL is about .1 for each degree of attack angle from 1 through 10 or 12.) (However, how the airfoil is mounted, re proximity to walls, etc., will affect lift.) Then, with CL in hand you can measure lift force with a strain gauge (etc.) and apply the formula for lift, which is 1/2 rho x area x Vsquared x CL. (rho = mass density of the fluid.)

Perhaps even easier, is to simply measure lift, and measure flow with some other method in which you have some confidence. Then, knowing that lift varies with the square of speed, you can subsequently use the lift as the measure.

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