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Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1

Pipe Class

09/19/2009 2:10 AM

I want a detail for Pipe Class ? how can i calculate thickness from Class ? for exp:- for class B pipe with OD 60 . what will be thickness & ID.?

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Guru
United Kingdom - Member - Not a new member!

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: USA/Europe
Posts: 4632
Good Answers: 77
#1

Re: Pipe Class

09/20/2009 1:43 AM

Hello anil,

Welcome to the CR4 site. We are friendly and the Members are very knowledgeable. But you must bear in mind there is many different pipes so a better worded and more explanatory request would have helped.

If you know the OD and the ID of a pipe, you can work out the wall thickness by deducting the ID from the OD and dividing by two.

Please note: I have spell checked my written items. But have not spell checked the detail of the pasted http://www.mcmaster.com.

You know what you are talking about right?......... Unfortunately I do not know what code you are using. ASME, ASA etc?

However, I have found a site which I list below:

McMaster pipe details, page 3

The details you need are on the right side of the page at the bottom, it lists the pipe thickness for various pipe sizes.

The site address 'link' for the exact page you need is listed above.

(There is hundreds of pages). A copy of page 3 of the Catalogue is pasted below.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  • Selecting and Measuring Pipe Fittings & Pipe

Thread Type Compatibility
In order for two components to fit properly, thread types must be compatible. See the list below for thread types that can be used together.

Tapered Threads

Compatibility

NPT— National Pipe Taper (Note : MPT and FPT are NPT threads; the "M" indicates male and the and "F" indicates female)

Female NPT can be used with Male NPT and Male NPTF threads. Male NPT can be used with the following Female threads: NPT, NPTF, NPSM, NPSH, NPSL, and NPSC

NPTF— National Pipe Tapered Fine (Note : NPTF threads are also known as Dryseal)

Female NPTF can be used with Male NPTF and Male NPT threads. Male NPTF can be used with the following Female threads: NPTF, NPT, NPSM and NPSH

BSPT— British Standard Pipe Taper (also known as R threads)

Female BSPT can be used with Male BSPT threads. Male BSPT can be used with Female BSPT and Female BSPP threads

Straight (Parallel) Threads

Compatibility

NPSM— National Pipe Straight Mechanical

Female NPSM can be used with Male NPSM, Male NPT, and Male NPTF threads. Male NPSM can be used with Female NPSM and Female NPSH threads

NPSH— National Pipe Straight Hose

Female NPSH can be used with the following Male threads: NPSH, NPT, NPTF, and NPSM. Male NPSH can be used with Female NPSH threads

NPSL— National Pipe Straight Locknut

Female NPSL can be used with Male NPT threads

NPSC— National Pipe Straight Coupling

Female NPSC can be used with Male NPT threads

BSPP— British Standard Pipe Parallel (also known as G threads)

Female BSPP can be used with Male BSPP and Male BSPT threads. Male BSPP can be used with Female BSPP threads

NH/NST— National Hose/National Standard Thread

NH/NST threads can only be used with other NH/NST threads

GHT— Garden Hose Thread

GHT threads can only be used with other GHT threads

UN/UNF— Unified

UN/UNF threads can only be used with other UN/UNF threads

Metric Thread DIN 3852

DIN 3852 threads can only be used with other DIN 3852 threads

Metric Thread DIN 3901/3902

DIN 3901/3902 threads can only be used with other DIN 3901/3902 threads

NPT vs. BSP (British Standard Pipe)
While NPT threads are common in the United States, BSP threads are widely used in many other countries.
There are two types of BSP threads: BSPT (British Standard Pipe Taper) and BSPP (British Standard Pipe Parallel). Both styles have the same thread angle, shape, and pitch (threads per inch), however, BSPT threads are tapered and BSPP threads are straight (parallel).
NPT and BSP threads are not compatible due to the differences in their threads. NPT threads are set at a 60° angle and have flattened peaks and valleys; BSP threads are set at a 55° angle and have rounded peaks and valleys.
Most NPT and BSP threads also have different pitches (threads per inch), which are listed below. To determine pitch, either count the number of threads that fall into a 1" span or use a thread gauge for a precise measurement.

Pipe Size

Pitch (Threads/Inch)

NPT

BSP

1/16"27___
1/8"2728
1/4"1819
3/8"1819
1/2"1414
5/8"___14

Pipe Size

Pitch (Threads/Inch)

NPT

BSP

3/4"1414
1"11 1/211
1 1/4"11 1/211
1 1/2"11 1/211
2"11 1/211
2 1/2"811

Pipe Size

Pitch (Threads/Inch)

NPT

BSP

3"811
3 1/2"811
4"811
5"811
6"811
8"8___

Unthreaded Pipe Dimensions and Schedule
Metal pipe, plastic pipe, and plastic pipe fittings are generally rated by schedule, which refers to the wall thickness. Metal pipe fittings, however, are generally rated by psi (pounds per square inch), which refers to the amount of pressure a fitting can endure.
The following information applies to both metal and plastic pipe, as well as plastic pipe fittings.

Thin wall (Schedule 10) is our lightest weight pipe. Standard wall (Schedule 40) is a popular choice because it's great for all-around use. Thick wall (Schedule 80) is perfect for high-pressure applications where greater mechanical strength is required. Extra-thick wall (Schedule 160) is designed for your most demanding applications where pressures are high.
Note: Due to different manufacturing methods and tolerances, the pipe ID and wall thickness specifications on your pipe may vary slightly from what's shown below.

I hope this helps. Please get back to me and let me know.

Good luck.

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