CR4 - The Engineer's Place for News and Discussion®

Previous in Forum: Turbo Jet Engine   Next in Forum: 1998 XJ8L Jaguar
Close

Comments Format:






Close

Subscribe to Discussion:

CR4 allows you to "subscribe" to a discussion
so that you can be notified of new comments to
the discussion via email.

Close

Rating Vote:







39 comments
Member

Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 6

Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/23/2010 3:19 AM

Hey guys.

I have a Ford trader 1982 model with a HA T3000 3ltr diesel motor in it. It seems to be using a lot of oil. I have been to a few mechanics and they all say something different. Can you help out please so I can tell them. Cheers

Register to Reply
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Comments rated to be "almost" Good Answers:

Check out these comments that don't yet have enough votes to be "official" good answers and, if you agree with them, rate them!
Guru
Hobbies - Automotive Performance - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Want to be: 34° 34' 21.60" N, 92° 55' 42.28" W Really am in Arizona
Posts: 29298
Good Answers: 1096
#1

Re: diesel engine using too much oil.

06/23/2010 6:41 AM

I am unfamiliar with a Ford trader, but when engine is using oil it means that the rings/cylinder liners are worn and the motor needs to be re-built.

Find a mechanic who doesn't own a boat.

__________________
Luck comes and goes. Skill is forever.
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2512
Good Answers: 60
#2

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil.

06/23/2010 9:30 AM

when you say a lot what do you mean by a lot and over how many miles ?

http://www.migweb.co.uk/forums/engines-transmission/297404-ecotec-16v-1600-excessive-oil-consumption-have-i-entered-vauxhall-twighlight-zo.html

And checking with Vauxhall (who said I should check my handbook) the official figure is that the engine should use 0.07 litres of oil per 100km which works out at about 1 litre for every 1000 miles!!!

By the way if you work out when the vauxhall needs a service according to their offical figures the car would have run out of oil before the service was due, Good design eh !!

Register to Reply
Power-User
United States - Member - American all the way Hobbies - Target Shooting - Aint nuthin like killing an innocent soup can!!!

Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Brownsville, Oregon, USA
Posts: 348
Good Answers: 10
#3

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil.

06/23/2010 4:32 PM

Define using in one of these terms

Burning

OR

Leaking

The former is acceptable in certain amounts according to how tight the tolerances are set by the manufacturer.

The latter is only acceptable if you are an ecoterrorist.

__________________
Give me enough duct tape and I can fix anything!
Register to Reply
Member

Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 6
#7
In reply to #3

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil.

06/23/2010 7:23 PM

It burning as I have no leaks

Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Newcastle Oz
Posts: 943
Good Answers: 148
#4

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/23/2010 6:20 PM

The Ford Trader is a Badge engineered Mazda T series Medium class truck up to about 7 tonnes GVM.

You need to define a lot of oil, how much oil are you topping up with?

Are you topping up every week or every day?

Are you travelling 50 kilometers a day or 500 kilometers a day?

When the truck is parked overnight do you wind up with an oil spot on the ground, if so how large?

When the engine is warmed up and running does it blow blue/white smoke? Being a diesel it will blow a sooty black under load.

These motors are hardworking and with appropriate fettling long wearing. They are based (so it is said) on a Perkins design. These motors can be readily rebuilt "In Frame" however to do a proper job it has to come out. No biggie because the Cab Over Engine Trader's cab will tilt clear of the motor for servicing. Thats is unless someone has put a "Luton" peak pantech van body on it, without the clearance to tilt the cab. I have seen that done.

Parts are readily available on the internet. If your truck has done a significant amount of mileage then it's probably due for a birthday.

Mazda T4000 truck same as Ford Trader runs a 6 cylinder diesel

You need to check to see if it is leaking oil, if the motor is a mess already then degrease it clean, top and bottom. Then check at regular intervals to see where it is coming from.

If the oil is dripping from the bell housing then the motor will need to come out to get the rear main seal replaced. While its out you may as well give it a rebuild and don't forget the welsh/freeze plugs.

If it is seeping out from around the rocker cover then thats a quick job to replace the gasket.

__________________
There are two reasons for a man to do a thing, One that sounds good, and the real one...
Register to Reply
Power-User
United States - Member - American all the way Hobbies - Target Shooting - Aint nuthin like killing an innocent soup can!!!

Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Brownsville, Oregon, USA
Posts: 348
Good Answers: 10
#5
In reply to #4

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/23/2010 6:27 PM

I completely disagree with your comment:

These motors can be readily rebuilt "In Frame" however to do a proper job it has to come out

Have rebuilt many truck and tractor engines "In Frame" and warranty my work the same as for one completely removed from the vehicle.

Done properly has nothing to do with technique and everything to do with attention to detail.

__________________
Give me enough duct tape and I can fix anything!
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Newcastle Oz
Posts: 943
Good Answers: 148
#9
In reply to #5

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/23/2010 8:50 PM

You are quite right in that a "In Frame" rebuild is as good as an R&R rebuild. However, this only stands for a motor in known condition. As I don't know the overall condition of the vehicle/motor or the operational history I can only advise to the worst case scenario.

There are some things that are awfully difficult to do in frame, like the welsh/freeze plugs that hide behind the flywheel, If you have to pull the gearbox out you may as well pull the motor its easier. Also there are certain repair/machining tasks like truing the deck, or if you need to replace the cam bearings, that are easier to do out of frame.

If its only a quick freshen up with new pistons, rings, sleeves, Main/Big end bearings and a head service. Then the in frame rebuild is ideal, and the motor will be good for another 300,000km's (with appropriate servicing).

By using the colloquial term "proper job" I am referring to a total back to bare block tear down and rebuild, with hot tanking. Which would be appropriate if the motor is very long in the tooth and has not been looked after.

__________________
There are two reasons for a man to do a thing, One that sounds good, and the real one...
Register to Reply Score 1 for Good Answer
Member

Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 6
#6
In reply to #4

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/23/2010 7:21 PM

Hey

I have had the rear main seal done a couple of days ago. It does not drip any oil as I have cleaned it and watched over it. Am I using the wrong oil? What oil should I be using? I am travelling about 200 kilometres a day. It is used for a mini skip truck so usually carrying between I or 2 tonne. It blows out black smoke when under load. I have been told by one mechanic that the rings need doing and been told by another mechanic they dont.I have also been told to use 10/40 oil and put a Moreys oil stabilizer in it also. Does that sound correct. Cheers

Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2512
Good Answers: 60
#8
In reply to #6

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/23/2010 8:07 PM

If its burning the oil its 99% certain to be the piston rings.

unles there is a leak from the oil gallery directly into one of the cylinders, I have seen this only once, The only way to discover this is to strip the engine.

The quickest way to find out if the rings are to blame is to get the "mechanic" to perform a compresion test on the cylinders and compare the results with the manufacture`s information

If the figures cant be obtained or worked out using the formulaes at the end of this page.

A quick way is to test compressions then squirt some oil into the cylinders through the injector ports and try the compression again, if the is a substantial increase then its the rings.

http://www.tpub.com/content/construction/14264/css/14264_105.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compression_ratio

The ratio is calculated by the following formula:

, where = cylinder bore (diameter) = piston stroke length = clearance volume. It is the volume of the combustion chamber (including head gasket). This is the minimum volume of the space at the end of the compression stroke, i.e. when the piston reaches top dead center (TDC). Because of the complex shape of this space, it is usually measured directly rather than calculated

Diesel engine

In an auto-ignition diesel engine, (no electrical sparking plug—the hot air of compression lights the injected fuel) the CR will customarily exceed 14:1. Ratios over 22:1 are common. The appropriate compression ratio depends on the design of the cylinder head. The figure is usually between 14:1 and 16:1 for direct injection engines and between 18:1 and 23:1 for indirect injection engines.

[edit] Fault finding and diagnosis

Measuring the compression pressure of an engine, with a pressure gauge connected to the spark plug opening, gives an indication of the engine's state and quality. There is, however, no formula to calculate compression ratio based on cylinder pressure.

If the nominal compression ratio of an engine is given, the pre-ignition cylinder pressure can be estimated using the following relationship:

where is the cylinder pressure at bottom dead center (BDC) which is usually at 1 atm, CR is the compression ratio, and is the specific heat ratio for the working fluid, which is about 1.4 for air, and 1.3 for methane-air mixture.

For example, if an engine running on gasoline has a compression ratio is 10:1, the cylinder pressure at top dead center (TDC) is

This figure, however, will also depend on cam (i.e. valve) timing. Generally, cylinder pressure for common automotive designs should at least equal 10 bar, or, roughly estimated in pounds per square inch (psi) as between 15 and 20 times the compression ratio, or in this case between 150 psi and 200 psi, depending on cam timing. Purpose-built racing engines, stationary engines etc. will return figures outside this range.

Factors including late intake valve closure (relatively speaking for camshaft profiles outside of typical production car range, but not necessarily into the realm of competition engines) can produce a misleadingly low figure from this test. Excessive connecting rod clearance, combined with extremely high oil pump output (rare but not impossible) can sling enough oil to coat the cylinder walls with enough oil to facilitate reasonable piston ring seal artificially give a misleadingly high figure, on engines with compromised ring seal.

This can actually be used to some slight advantage. If a compression test does give a low figure, and it has been determined it is not due to intake valve closure/camshaft characteristics, then one can differentiate between the cause being valve/seat seal issues and ring seal by squirting engine oil into the spark plug orifice, in a quantity sufficient to disperse across the piston crown and the circumference of the top ring land, and thereby effect the mentioned seal. If a second compression test is performed shortly thereafter, and the new reading is much higher, it would be the ring seal that is problematic, whereas if the compression test pressure observed remains low, it is a valve sealing (or more rarely head gasket, or breakthrough piston or rarer still cylinder wall damage) issue.

If there is a significant (> 10%) difference between cylinders, that may be an indication that valves or cylinder head gaskets are leaking, piston rings are worn or that the block is cracked.

If a problem is suspected then a more comprehensive test using a leak-down tester can locate the leak.

Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Newcastle Oz
Posts: 943
Good Answers: 148
#10

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/23/2010 9:38 PM

I've done a tad more research to back up my memory,

The HA is a 4 cylinder diesel much like the Perkins 4.154 only 3.0 litres in capacity and runs around 21:1 compression ratio.

You haven't mentioned the mileage of the truck on its current motor, or if it has been rebuilt before.

Being a 1982 model makes it about a 28 year old truck, I'd be suggesting that if the motor has not had a rebuilt before, it is now very due.

At the least get the rings and bearings done, however you may need to get the head serviced with new guides and valve stem seals.

If you have good compression equally between all the cylinders then it may be oil going down the valve guides.

You don't say where you are located, which makes giving advice a little bit more difficult.

Parts and rebuild kits for this motor are available on ebay and alibaba. Also 2nd hand, rebuilt and crate motors are available as well. You might like to browse these links too.

http://www.autopartseastafrica.com/pdf/autoparts-catalogue-EA.pdf

http://www.alibaba.com/countrysearch/CN/mazda-engine.html

It would be preferable to find a good diesel mechanic to do the overhaul, remember that the cheapest price is not necessarily the best price.

You are making your living from this vehicle and if the wheels aren't turning you aren't earning.

You should be using Diesel engine oil like, Shell Rimula, Caltex Delo, Castrol GTX Diesel, rather than just a engine oil. As for what weight oil it depends on your operating conditions. 15w40 is a good average weight oil for most general applications.

__________________
There are two reasons for a man to do a thing, One that sounds good, and the real one...
Register to Reply
Member

Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 6
#11
In reply to #10

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/24/2010 12:15 AM

Tobugrynbak,

Thanks for your input. I am living in Australia. The engine was rebuilt when I bought it about two years ago. It has done about 200,000 kilometres since. I will take your advice and get it checked out. Also I am having a bit of trouble starting it of a morning. Some mornings no problem others it sounds like the battery is low. I have all the electrical parts serviced, new battery, starter motor has been tested, glow plugs are working and all the wiring is up to scratch. I have been told it may be because too much diesel is going through the injectors. Whats your opinion on that.

Cheers

Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Newcastle Oz
Posts: 943
Good Answers: 148
#12
In reply to #11

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/24/2010 1:10 AM

G'day 1jimmy ,

Hmm, too much fuel on start up, nope new one on me. Might be one of those,"don't know what it is but this sounds good", sort of suggestions that mechanics and auto electricians give when their baffled. Mechanics will make it an auto electrical problem, Auto elecs will make it a mechanical problem....

If your battery isn't of large enough capacity it will do that on cold mornings. This motor does have a very high compression ratio, which means that on cold mornings it will have to work really hard to crank that motor. Alternatively (and sorta contradictory) you may have a loss of compression due to the cold which will make for harder starting, but when its warm will run and start ok.

The other thing is, do you disengage the clutch while your starting? By disengaging the clutch you unload the gearbox from the motor, this allows the starter to turn just the motor. When cold the gearbox can put a noticeable load on the motor till the gearbox oil warms up. You'll notice a drop in engine rpm when you let the clutch out. It's standard operating procedure for larger trucks especially those fitted with constant mesh Road Ranger gearboxes.

Get a cold compression test done on the motor to get an idea as to its health. With only 200000kms on the clock I'd be surprised that the oil consuption would be high. Unless its only driven in short hops all the time. If you haven't been keeping the oil changes up that would promote early wear. If your using more than 1 litre per 5000km and your not losing it on the ground then you have a oil consumption problem.

__________________
There are two reasons for a man to do a thing, One that sounds good, and the real one...
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2512
Good Answers: 60
#16
In reply to #12

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/24/2010 4:36 AM

Alternatively (and sorta contradictory) you may have a loss of compression due to the cold which will make for harder starting, but when its warm will run and start ok.

Cold air does not affect compresion, But does mean the air is colder than normal when sucked into the engine and if the compression is low will need more heating up, Thats why diesels have heater plugs.

COMPRESSION TEST NEEDED

Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Newcastle Oz
Posts: 943
Good Answers: 148
#19
In reply to #16

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/24/2010 6:31 AM

Pete, I didn't mean cold air, but cold in temperature generally. We've had quite a few mornings with low single digit temperatures lately, I've been very grateful for the heated seats in the Volvo warrior wagon.

As you are aware, everything shrinks in the cold. Some bits more than others which may affect the clearances around the piston rings etc.

Again its difficult to give definitive answers when your not there staring at the problem.

Your right as usual.. Compression test will tell the tale.

__________________
There are two reasons for a man to do a thing, One that sounds good, and the real one...
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2512
Good Answers: 60
#20
In reply to #19

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/24/2010 7:02 AM

Sorry I misunder stood.

Yes when cold the parts on the engine would shrink

My appologies

Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Power-User

Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 197
Good Answers: 18
#18
In reply to #12

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/24/2010 5:27 AM

1jimmy,

It does seem that Tobugrynbak know what he is talking about, and i can concur with most he has said. Perhaps i can add something here as well. If you get too much diesel into the cylinders at cold start you will definitely battle to start since too much fuel will tend to cool the chamber down, and cooling is a no-no for diesel ignition. You may also remove,clean and test the glowplugs resistence. If one failed - problem. The resistence of a glowoplug varies across manufacturers, but Ford is typically between 1 and 6 ohms. But the trick here is NOT to have two plugs at 5 and another 2 at 1 ohm. They should all be within 10% of one another (this % is my own rule of thimb, which have not failed me yet) Remember if one or two plugs are higher they will require more power from the battery. If it sounds like the battery is straining, less power will be available to heat the plugs sufficiently. By the way, if you do get too much fuel, you will notice heavier black smoke on idle, and severe black smoke under load. Burning oil as well, you cant miss the whitish haze mixed in the black. If the exhaust is any other colour but pitch balck, youre burning more than just diesel.

__________________
Always learning
Register to Reply Score 1 for Good Answer
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - bwire Hobbies - Car Customizing - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Upper Mid-west USA
Posts: 7552
Good Answers: 98
#13
In reply to #11

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/24/2010 2:51 AM

Time to re-set the rack, at what mileage was the rack set last?

__________________
If death came with a warning there would be a whole lot less of it.
Register to Reply
Member

Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 6
#14
In reply to #13

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/24/2010 4:13 AM

Not sure what you mean by re-setting the rack.

Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - bwire Hobbies - Car Customizing - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Upper Mid-west USA
Posts: 7552
Good Answers: 98
#30
In reply to #14

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/24/2010 4:40 PM

Entire article is worthy but scroll down to excess fuel toggle

http://www.oldengine.org/members/diesel/articles/diesel1.htm

__________________
If death came with a warning there would be a whole lot less of it.
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2512
Good Answers: 60
#17
In reply to #13

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/24/2010 4:46 AM

Bwire are you refering to the control rack int the pump?

GET COMPRESSION CHECKED

Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
Hobbies - RC Aircraft - New Member Hobbies - Automotive Performance - New Member Hobbies - DIY Welding - New Member

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Fort Lauderdale Florida
Posts: 5303
Good Answers: 113
#21
In reply to #13

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/24/2010 7:46 AM

How did we get on the subject of her rack?

__________________
Bob
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2512
Good Answers: 60
#15
In reply to #11

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/24/2010 4:14 AM

if the compression is low because of the rings, you will get hard starting.

Your engine is a compression ignition engine, ie the air in the cylinders gets hot when compressed then fuel is sprayed in and ignites.

Low compression means low heat means poor starting.

GET YOUR COMPRESSION TESTED

Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 14943
Good Answers: 161
#22

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/24/2010 7:55 AM

I have read all the way down.

I have seen black smoke mentioned (fuel not burning completely for anyone of many reasons, but often injectors), but nobody appears to have asked if there is also blue smoke (lubrication oil) when running.

If you do not see Blue smoke, you are not burning the oil, or the oil burning is only of a very very small quantity.

If no blue smoke, then the oil is leaking away somewhere.....

(I did not see any statement of just how much oil per 1000 miles is being burnt/lost, but it may still be within manufacturing tolerance.....)

__________________
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt!"
Register to Reply
Guru
Hobbies - RC Aircraft - New Member Hobbies - Automotive Performance - New Member Hobbies - DIY Welding - New Member

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Fort Lauderdale Florida
Posts: 5303
Good Answers: 113
#23

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/24/2010 7:57 AM

There are a few things that you might also want to look into before rebuilding the engine. A good quality 15 w 40 oil designed for heavy duty trucks will live longer than a 10 w 40 oil designed for automobiles.

An oil leak that is seeping onto the exhaust manifold will burn off before leaking onto the ground, and may hide the oil leakage. I do not know if this engine is turbocharged or not. But if it is, it is possible to have an oil seal leak only a little and pass oil into the incoming air to the engine, or into the exhaust pipe.

You will put a lot of money into rings and still not stop that type of oil loss.

If starting sounds slow, load test the battery, and check all of the battery connections to and from the starter. Good luck, and welcome to the insanity.

__________________
Bob
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2512
Good Answers: 60
#24
In reply to #23

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/24/2010 8:27 AM

COMPRESSION TEST

Register to Reply
Member

Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 6
#31
In reply to #23

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/24/2010 10:49 PM

Thanks for your input. I have just dropped the oil and change both oil filters. I filled it up with 15/40. I will take it for a run tomor and see how it goes. I also put a oil stabilizer in it as a mech told me to do.

Register to Reply
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member Safety - ESD - New Member Hobbies - Fishing - New Member

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Near Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 50.390866N, 8.884827E
Posts: 14943
Good Answers: 161
#32
In reply to #31

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/25/2010 5:46 AM

Does the exhaust show "Blue" smoke?

__________________
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt!"
Register to Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Posts: 101
Good Answers: 1
#25

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/24/2010 8:45 AM

I suggest finding Schaeffer's Neutra and install 1 oz. for every quart of oil in the oil sump. Run it 500 miles, drain the oil, and install Schaeffer's #700, 15W-40.

If the rings are varnished-up, causing the leakage, the Neutra will clean them up.

The #700 will continue to clean the engine while providing much better lubrication. You will probably see 10% better fuel economy.

__________________
THEOILGUY55
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 929
Good Answers: 55
#26

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/24/2010 9:20 AM

There is an assumption that the culprit must be worn rings.

Not necessarily!

I had a VW diesel that tried to run on it's lubricating oil every time I crested a rise and the car floated. You can imagine my surprise at lifting my foot from the accelerator only to have the engine run away regardless.

That was many years ago and so I can't remember if the problem was a design flaw or assembly error but it was fixed.

You have to remember that the engine is looking for oil to burn. If it can't find refined diesel fuel, it will be quite happy burning it's lubricant until it either runs dry or seizes, which ever occurs first.

Laughing Jaguar

__________________
"Both the revolutionary and the creative individual are perpetual juveniles. The revolutionary does not grow up because he cannot grow, while the creative individual cannot grow up because he keeps growing." Eric Hoffer
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2512
Good Answers: 60
#27
In reply to #26

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/24/2010 12:02 PM

Diesel Engine Runaway

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diesel_engine_runaway

When the engine gets oil mist from somwhere it will run on the engine oil.

Possibly from the turbo charger

Oil seals including Rings

Or oil getting into the Inlet manifold

Register to Reply
Power-User
United States - Member - American all the way Hobbies - Target Shooting - Aint nuthin like killing an innocent soup can!!!

Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Brownsville, Oregon, USA
Posts: 348
Good Answers: 10
#28
In reply to #27

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/24/2010 12:16 PM

this is common on 2 cycle diesels (Detroit)

And industrial machines that run on extreme slopes

__________________
Give me enough duct tape and I can fix anything!
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2512
Good Answers: 60
#29

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/24/2010 12:23 PM

Does your engine have a turbo ?

Take a look at the exhaust manifold and look for any staining that could suggest an oil leak.

Is the cooling water clean, if oil is getting into the water the water becomes creamy

so if there is no oil in the water.

It has no turbo.

And the exhaust manifold is clean and there is no sign of a leak any where near the exhaust.

get a COMPRESSION check

Register to Reply
Power-User

Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 191
Good Answers: 4
#33

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/25/2010 11:02 AM

Jimmy, start looking at the cheapest cures first: Make sure the air filter and pipes is clean...no obstruction?

Remove oil filler cap while the engine is running; If a lot of air pumps out there, it will be gasses escaping past the piston rings. Before just fitting rings, make sure the piston ringgrooves is in perfect condition.

Make sure if that engine may run on higher viscosity oil like 20W-50...it might help.

Jurie sa

Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2512
Good Answers: 60
#34
In reply to #33

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/25/2010 11:25 AM

and a really cheap way of finding out if the rings are worn is

er hmmm whats it called now. err

Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 6)
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Newcastle Oz
Posts: 943
Good Answers: 148
#35
In reply to #34

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/25/2010 6:50 PM

Your a stirrer Pete fair dinkum..

__________________
There are two reasons for a man to do a thing, One that sounds good, and the real one...
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru

Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2512
Good Answers: 60
#36
In reply to #35

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/25/2010 9:08 PM

i am sure i dont know wot u mean.

just compresing the truth, sorry i was under pressure to say that,

Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru
Popular Science - Weaponology - bwire Hobbies - Car Customizing - New Member

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Upper Mid-west USA
Posts: 7552
Good Answers: 98
#37
In reply to #36

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/25/2010 9:41 PM

Origins of the Australian slang phrase fair dinkum, which originates from Chinese. It means real, and is used to allay any potential disbelief about some claim the speaker is making. Apparently, Chinese gold miners in the nineteenth century would tell others of any discoveries of gold using the phrase din gum meaning 'real gold' in Chinese.

It's an excellent story, and for all I know the Chinese words do really mean that. I've encountered the story before: it's recorded in a 1984 issue of the Sydney Morning Herald, no doubt among many other places. It's just another example, I'm afraid, of folk etymology — a well-meaning attempt to clarify the puzzling and explain the obscure.

Most dictionaries published outside Australia and New Zealand are unhelpful, just saying "origin unknown". But it seems very possible that it comes from an old English dialect term, which is recorded principally in Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary of 1896-1905. He found several examples of dinkum in various parts of England in the sense of a fair or due share of work. He also encountered fair dinkum in Lincolnshire, used in the same way that people might exclaim fair dos! as a request for fair dealing. But there's no clue where this word comes from, and dictionaries are cautious because it is not well recorded.

It turns up first in Australian writing in 1888 in Robbery Under Arms by Rolf Boldrewood, in which it had the sense of work or exertion: "It took us an hour's hard dinkum to get near the peak". Early on it could also mean something honest, reliable or genuine, though this is actually first recorded in New Zealand, in 1905. Fair dinkum is recorded from 1890 in the sense of fair play, and soon after in the way that Australians and New Zealanders still use it — of something reliable or genuine. There have been lots of related phrases since, like dinkum oil for an accurate report.

For me, being about as far from Australia as it's possible to get on this planet, the word brings to mind Robert Heinlein's The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, about a future penal colony on the moon in which everyone speaks a weird patois containing elements of Australian and Russian slang. The sentient computer at the centre of the story is described as "a fair dinkum thinkum". Go figure.

http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-fai3.htm

__________________
If death came with a warning there would be a whole lot less of it.
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 6)
Guru

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Newcastle Oz
Posts: 943
Good Answers: 148
#38
In reply to #37

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/26/2010 12:09 AM

I was once told that the Chinese didn't have a word for problem, so they used the word for opportunity instead. That was of course, complete bunkum. The Chinese have more words for problem than the Inuits have for snow.

At least the story sounded good..

__________________
There are two reasons for a man to do a thing, One that sounds good, and the real one...
Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 5)
Guru

Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2512
Good Answers: 60
#39
In reply to #37

Re: Diesel Engine Using Too Much Oil

06/26/2010 1:46 AM

Thankyou for the explanation.

Register to Reply Off Topic (Score 6)
Register to Reply 39 comments
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.

Comments rated to be "almost" Good Answers:

Check out these comments that don't yet have enough votes to be "official" good answers and, if you agree with them, rate them!
Copy to Clipboard

Users who posted comments:

1jimmy (5); Andy Germany (2); bob c (2); bwire (3); farmatt (3); jurie sa (1); jvrj (1); Laughing Jaguar (1); lyn (1); peterg7lyq (12); THEOILGUY55 (1); Tobugrynbak (7)

Previous in Forum: Turbo Jet Engine   Next in Forum: 1998 XJ8L Jaguar

Advertisement