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9 comments
Anonymous Poster

Inspection Lab Temperature Requirements

10/26/2010 1:04 PM

Our inspection lab temperature is set to 68 +/- 2 degrees F; where is it documented that this might be a requirement? From what Standard? I cannot find anywhere this actual documented requirement.

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Guru
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#1

Re: Inspection Lab Temperature Requirements

10/26/2010 1:11 PM

What might you be inspecting in your lab?

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Guru
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#2

Re: Inspection Lab Temperature Requirements

10/26/2010 4:45 PM

You might try MIL-STD-45662. No guarantees, it's been a long time.

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#3

Re: Inspection Lab Temperature Requirements

10/26/2010 9:30 PM

For what it is worth: 68 degrees Fahrenheit equals 20 degrees Celsius, A standard, good to work in and with and easy to use worldwide.

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Associate

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#4

Re: Inspection Lab Temperature Requirements

10/27/2010 3:04 AM

If you look at the various "standard" conditions specified by different organizations, you will find a wide range of temperatures and pressures used. In the US, it seems that the NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) uses a temperature of 20 °C (293.15 K, 68 °F) and an absolute pressure of 101.325 kPa (14.696 psi, 1 atm) while the IUPAC (International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry) uses a temperature of 0 °C (273.15 K, 32 °F) and an absolute pressure of 100 kPa (14.504 psi, 0.986 atm). There are a host of other "standards" out there so you need to check what tests you are doing and what regulatory body controls.

You would think that a "standard" would be easy but in the engineering world nothing is!

Good Luck...

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Active Contributor

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#6
In reply to #4

Re: Inspection Lab Temperature Requirements

10/27/2010 10:20 AM

NIST also has a standard for the Thermocouples that are involved in the process. I;m going to assume based on the temps listed that you have Type "K" thermocouples as part of the process. Type "K" have a spec of +/- 1.2 degrees C or 2 degrees F.

WIth that, your best case measurement will be +/- 1.2 degrees C or 2 degrees F.

Hope this helps.

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Associate

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#5

Re: Inspection Lab Temperature Requirements

10/27/2010 8:40 AM

The laboratory quality system may have been designed around ISO Guide 17025, which is the standard used by A2LA (et all) to audit the quality system of the lab. But it doesnt specify conditions, it indicates that the conditions be "such as to facilitate correct performance of the test and/or calibration". To me that means that the specific article you are inspecting has a standard somewhere that defines the ambient conditons required. For example, calibration laboratories have to store gauge blocks for a preiod of time at a specific temperature to account for the coefficient of thermal expansion. So each industry has a standard of some kind that defines this, and in many cases there are several.

If you can tell me what you are inspecting, I can probably identify the standard you might be using.

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#7

Re: Inspection Lab Temperature Requirements

11/02/2010 2:49 AM

Not sure about your question, but read ASTM 370. Maybe you fish something there.

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Anonymous Poster
#8

Re: Inspection Lab Temperature Requirements

11/04/2010 7:23 AM

ANSI Y14.5

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Participant

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#9

Re: Inspection Lab Temperature Requirements

12/18/2010 5:34 PM

The effects of thermal expansion should be taken into consideration on both the part and the gage.The temperature of the part and the gage should be the same.68°F is the ideal temperature at which both part and gage should be at when inspected because gages are calibrated at 68°F.This effectively eliminates any error due to thermal expansion.

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