CR4 - The Engineer's Place for News and Discussion®

Previous in Forum: Foaming in STP   Next in Forum: TGA of Ash
Close

Comments Format:






Close

Subscribe to Discussion:

CR4 allows you to "subscribe" to a discussion
so that you can be notified of new comments to
the discussion via email.

Close

Rating Vote:







5 comments
Participant

Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 3

Reinforced Resin Matrix

04/22/2012 9:05 PM

I am in the process of constructing a composite wing for my homebuilt aircraft, and have had the notion of using carbon nanotube,(arc produced soot), to increase bolth tensile and peel strengths of comercially available epoxy resins. The goal would be enhanced stiffnes and shock resistance in a unidirectional carbon fiber laminate. any thoughts and/or ideas on this would be very welcome.

Register to Reply
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.
Guru
Hobbies - Automotive Performance - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Want to be: 34° 34' 21.60" N, 92° 55' 42.28" W Really am in Arizona
Posts: 30118
Good Answers: 1139
#1

Re: Reinforced Resin Matrix

04/22/2012 10:00 PM

Well, your life hangs in the balance, so be careful.

Do you have any experience with lay-ups? Vacuum bags? Epoxies? Composite materials?

You may not need any more stiffness, or shock resistance.

You will need to test the modified materials to be sure they perform as they should.

Good luck.

__________________
Luck comes and goes. Skill is forever. The supply of fools will always outstrip the demand .
Register to Reply
Participant

Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 3
#3
In reply to #1

Re: Reinforced Resin Matrix

04/23/2012 1:34 PM

Thank you Lyn, yes,a couple of decades, build/repair raceboats for a living. My concerns stem from instant and total failures I've observed in carbon fiber sailboat masts. (hand layup, alternating biaxial/uni cloth in west system 5-1.05/209- resin to mfg spec). Seemingly insignificant rigging strikes can result in a tiny milky spot without surface fracture. These tend to peel propagate both tangent to the fiber strand and multi layer. Under magnification the failed resin looks like gravel. The nanotubes? If those little baskets could be made homogeneous within the resin matrix,well,,you get the idea. Testing will be expensive but with aircraft there are no do overs. (Ideas?)

Register to Reply
Guru
Hobbies - Automotive Performance - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Want to be: 34° 34' 21.60" N, 92° 55' 42.28" W Really am in Arizona
Posts: 30118
Good Answers: 1139
#4
In reply to #3

Re: Reinforced Resin Matrix

04/23/2012 1:47 PM

Delamination is a bad thing. Is it because of poor impact strength of the resin, or less than perfect adhesion of resin to fiber?

I think you are more qualified than I, so I can only give encouragement to experiment and test.

Have you contacted any big resin formulators? Dow/3M/Henkel/Du Pont? I was never impressed by Loctite's products, but that was 20 years ago. (Now you know why I can't help you, I'm a dinosaur) They may be working with nanotechnology.

Good luck.

__________________
Luck comes and goes. Skill is forever. The supply of fools will always outstrip the demand .
Register to Reply
Guru
Engineering Fields - Systems Engineering - New Member Popular Science - Weaponology - New Member

Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: San Diego
Posts: 2637
Good Answers: 61
#2

Re: Reinforced Resin Matrix

04/22/2012 11:04 PM

In addition to the above, of note: a relatively small proportion of arc soot is actually nanotube

High-quality single-walled carbon nanotubes from arc-produced soot

Abstract

High-quality single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were obtained from arc-produced soot using a three-step purification process consisting of soft oxidation, air oxidation, and a high-temperature vacuum treatment. Firstly an oxide layer was formed on the surface of the metal catalyst, which prevents the SWNTs from undergoing metal-assisted dissociation during the process. After the final step, about 20% of the weight of the initial raw soot remained and the final product contained less than 1% metal. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the SWNTs obtained.

  • Hisashi Kajiuraa, , ,
  • Shigemitsu Tsutsuia,
  • Houjin Huanga,
  • Yousuke Murakamib

So my first suggestion would be some experiments on what the metal-containing 80% does to your epoxy.

Or figure out how much non-nanotube material you can tolerate, 99% nanotube runs about $250 a gram.

__________________
"If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that!"
Register to Reply
Guru

Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 1756
Good Answers: 59
#5

Re: Reinforced Resin Matrix

04/24/2012 12:10 AM

Yo have a big ticket technological challenge. Airplane manufacturer of mainly carbon fiber components use additional kevlar and at least 2 different glass fabric for a mix and match adiustment of the local material characteristics. The designer make great use of the directional properties.

Additionally, woven and stranded fibres retain a well known portion of the resin during vacuum bagging. Losing the excess to a sacrifical layer.

Since the nanotubes are a powder, none of the described (and more) knowledge is available to you. Simply put you are entirely on your own to devise a new technology. I wish you great luck and perseverance.

Register to Reply
Register to Reply 5 comments
Interested in this topic? By joining CR4 you can "subscribe" to
this discussion and receive notification when new comments are added.
Copy to Clipboard

Users who posted comments:

edignan (1); leveles (1); lyn (2); patrickbrockhaus (1)

Previous in Forum: Foaming in STP   Next in Forum: TGA of Ash

Advertisement