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Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

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March Military Campaign: The Ford GPA (Seep)

Posted March 09, 2011 8:30 AM by dstrohl

Last summer, a reader sent us a some photos he purchased at Dearbon-area garage sale. Among the photos in that lot were two shots of the Ford GPA, the so-called Seep, taken right outside Ford's River Rouge plant. The Library of Congress has a similar photo in its collection, and notes that all production GPAs were tested in this slip near the factory.

The GPA in the shot at left is different. The lack of ribbing on the hull gives this one away as a pre-production pilot model. According to a GPA history, river testing didn't start until February 1942. There's make no mention of when production started, but note that a host of design changes were introduced in November 1942 and that production ended in March 1943.

The date on this latter photograph appears to be September 2, 1942 and we can note that this GPA also appears to be missing its headlamps and trim vane. Could this have been the official public unveiling of the GPA? Or was it simply a roll-out for Ford executives?

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