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Space Bacteria — Do We Have Company in the Universe

Posted March 16, 2011 7:00 AM

NASA's Richard Hoover has done groundbreaking work for years on life forms that survive in harsh environments like ocean trenches and volcanic vents. Now, he's discovered fossils in a carbonaceous chondrite that he's identified as cyanobacteria — alien life. If he's right, what do we do next?

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Join Date: Jul 2008
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#1

Re: Space Bacteria — Do We Have Company in the Universe

03/16/2011 10:29 PM

I think the first thing you have to do is prove that it is cyanobacteria and that it came for out of our Solar System. Frankly, NASA's Dr. Hoover needs to present the media with a lot more than just a few pictures. Cyanobacteria is all around us so even if it is from some place other than Earth, there is really no need to become alarmed.

What should alarm people is the general state of the economy and our Goverment.

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#2
In reply to #1

Re: Space Bacteria — Do We Have Company in the Universe

03/17/2011 12:36 AM

Ah ah ah Karl. We don't bring politics to CR4. Leave that in the other forums please. This thread is about space bacteria, and CR4 is about Science and Engineering.

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#3

Re: Space Bacteria — Do We Have Company in the Universe

03/17/2011 12:48 AM

Dr. Hoover's claims, as qualified as he is, are not strongly enough supported to be fully accepted as faultless fact in the scientific community. I think the news will make a much bigger splash if it ever becomes indisputable.

In fact, it will be a momentous event in history! The news will come at some point. Of that, I have no doubt. I just wish that it's in my lifetime! I'm going to disagree with the other posters suggestion that it's no big deal. I don't know anybody that thinks its no big deal. People either don't believe that it will ever happen cuz we're alone, or they think it will. But, to be blaze` about it.... hmm

The search for life is going to take its own sweet time. But it will take a lot longer if we don't make the effort.

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Join Date: May 2005
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#4

Re: Space Bacteria — Do We Have Company in the Universe

03/17/2011 10:41 AM

A couple of non-political observations:

1) Cyano (blue) bacteria are one of the most prevalent bacteria everywhere on this planet and have been since life began here, from harsh crust, volcanic, and undersea areas to the edges of the upper atmosphere, there are an immense variety of various types, forms, and families of this nature that enjoy the property of getting their energy from photosynthesis.

2) Rocks of all sizes have flown through our atmosphere and splashed back out into space since well before life began here, and have grabbed a bit of whatever was floating around in the atmosphere ever since.

3) Many varieties of bacteria, including various cyanobacteria and lichen, are known to be capable of surviving a ride through space.

4) Any dormant bacteria that thrive on photosynthesis could be expected to explode in bloom if a few ever found their way to a friendly pocket of any material, water, fluid, saturated gas, whatever and wherever there is sunlight and the right conditions.

THEREFORE:

A) It would NOT be surprising to find earth-sourced bacteria in space, on asteroids, and on other planets.

B) After this many years, it WOULD be surprising if we found a small pocket of ice or evidence of a past such location in our solar system, and did NOT find evidence of microbial life. Earth-sourced life. DNA would likely indicate a strain identical or at least similar to strains found here in fossilized form.

C) Any fossilized remains of bacteria, especially cyanobacteria, cannot be reliably shown to come from anywhere other than earth, as there is no way to analyze the DNA if none is present.

Any claims to 'alien' sourcing are therefore political or speculative hyperbole, not scientific.

When followed by requests for grants to study the possibility, paid authorship of articles with sensationalistic fervor, or announcements of a book release; the general "follow the money" rule applies.

When followed by announcements of proof of some Darwinistic evolutionary theme are included as conclusions, the general "follow the ideological bias" rule applies.

When followed by unpaid 'scholarly articles' full of grand generalizations and speculations, submitted as well to publishers as a side-bar in developing textbooks for young skulls full of mush, the general "follow the ego" rule applies.

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#5

Re: Space Bacteria; Do We Have Company in the Universe

03/17/2011 2:25 PM

Watch the movie "Monsters" by Vertigo Films set in present day Mexico.

And you'll have your answer of what next.

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