Hemmings Motor News Blog Blog

Hemmings Motor News Blog

Hemmings Motor News has been around since 1954. We're proud of our heritage, but we're also more than the Hemmings full of classifieds that your father subscribed to. Aside from new editorial content every month in Hemmings, we have three monthly magazines: Hemmings Muscle Machines, Hemmings Classic Car and Hemmings Sports and Exotic Car.

While our editors traverse the country to find the best content for those magazines, we find other oddities related to the old-car hobby that we really had no place for - until now. With this blog, we're giving you a behind-the-scenes look at what we see and what we do during the course of putting out some of the finest automotive magazines you'll ever read.

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Angular and Aerodynamic: 1979 Ford Probe I

Posted August 17, 2011 9:00 AM by dstrohl

Years before Ford angered Mustang fans with its plans to switch it to a Mazda-based front-wheel-drive platform that became the production Ford Probe in 1989, it showed off a series of five spaceship-looking concept cars also named Probe, all designed to explore the outer reaches of aerodynamic efficiency. That series of concept cars kicked off with this Ghia-built 1979 Ford Probe I, a Fox Mustang-based coupe powered by a turbocharged 2.3L four-cylinder (the same basic engine that wound up in the Mustang SVO) and good for a drag coefficient of 0.22.

Probe I was considerably more immune to the fluctuations of the petroleum market. Its sleek and angular aerodynamic shape achieved a drag coefficient in the wind tunnel of 0.22, some 37 percent less than the 0.40 then typical for a two-door, four-passenger coupe. Its use of the newly developed W Code Mustang Cobra engine was able to double the average fuel economy of the conventional 2 +2 sports sedan without sacrificing horsepower.

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