BRM's Flexible Honing, Surface Finishing, and Deburring Blog Blog

BRM's Flexible Honing, Surface Finishing, and Deburring Blog

BRM's Flexible Honing, Surface Finishing, and Deburring Blog is the place for conversation and discussion about how to solve difficult finishing problems. For over 50 years, Brush Research Manufacturing (BRM) has helped customers use brushing technology to clean, rebuild, and resurface components ranging from engine cylinders to brake rotors to flywheels to firearms. BRM's Blog on CR4 provides real-world examples of how flex hones and wire brushes work. It also evaluates related technologies and invites questions from the community.

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Flexible Honing for U.S. Model of 1917 Firearms

Posted November 13, 2012 8:15 AM by Brush Research

The U.S. Model of 1917 is a .30 caliber, breach-loading, bolt-action rifle modeled after the British P-17. Made in America by Winchester and the Remington Arms Co., the M1917 is often called the American Enfield in honor of its U.K. origins. Gunsmiths and gun collectors sometimes disagree about whether the U.S. Rifle, Caliber .30, M1917 (Enfield) is a true P17, but smart shooters know that firearms maintenance is what's really important when working with older rifles.

Cleaning and Maintaining Rifle Chambers

According to the U.S. War Department's Basic Field Manual of 1942, the chamber of the M1917 Enfield rifle "must be cleaned as thoroughly as the bore" because "a rough chamber may cause shells to stick." The Flex-Hone tool from Brush Research Manufacturing (BRM) wasn't invented back then, but we'd like to think it deserves a place in any gun manual's "Care and Cleaning Section". Ideal for removing residue from chambers, the Flex-Hone for Rifles is a durable and reliable gun brush.

Gun Blogger Garand Thumb

That's what a gun blogger called Garand Thumb learned last summer when his M1917 starting saving rounds because of ejection problems. While cleaning his Enfield rifle, the shooter discovered that the M1917's chamber "looked a little rough" because of rust and residue. After trying unsuccessfully to "clean it up with a chamber brush", the gun blogger ordered the Flex-Hone for Firearms from Brush Research. Later, while updating his readers about his weapon, he exclaimed how "this works!!!!" and that his rifle's rounds now "ejected like butter".

The Flex-Hone for Rifles

After lubricating his rifle's chamber with Flex-Hone oil, Garand Thumb chucked the mandrel of the Flex-Hone tool into his handheld DeWalt electric drill. With the receiver and the chamber clamped in a vice between two wooden blocks, the amateur gunsmith honed the rifle chamber for about a minute. Later, as he explained to readers, "be careful not to overpolish if you decide to try this". The Flex-Hone for Firearms is a surface finishing tool rather than a material removal tool, but that's good advice from a satisfied shooter. As Garand Thumb exclaims, "I am excited that I finally found a solution!"

Author's Note: This CR4 blog entry originally appeared in BRM's Flex-Hone Blog.

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#1

Re: Flexible Honing for U.S. Model of 1917 Firearms

11/14/2012 10:52 AM

I think the US used 30-06. In WWII the M1 Carbine was .30 Cal. and wasn't interchangeable with the M1 Rifle, which was also 30-06.

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#2
In reply to #1

Re: Flexible Honing for U.S. Model of 1917 Firearms

11/16/2012 4:33 PM

No, the M1917 used cartridge .303 British. The M1 Carbine used ammo called .30 Carbine, or 7.62×33mm. Yes, the M1 Garand used .30-06 ammunition.

Three entirely different cartridges.

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#3
In reply to #2

Re: Flexible Honing for U.S. Model of 1917 Firearms

11/16/2012 5:05 PM

Thank you.

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#4
In reply to #2

Re: Flexible Honing for U.S. Model of 1917 Firearms

11/20/2012 8:07 AM

he US model of 1917 is chambered in 30-06 Springfield. As opposed to the British version the "P14" which is chambered in .303.

At the onset of WWI the US didn't have enough 1903's and had 3 contract plants that were making P14's for the brits (who had shifted back towards the SMLE for WWI). So they stretched the action a bit to chamber them in 30-06 and the US 1917 was born.

The US model of 1917 was issued 2:1 during WWI compared to the more commonly associated 1903.

I love these old rifles :)

-Finch from Garandthumb.com :)

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